8,993 research outputs found

    The Arachnids of Richmond

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    Following the spirit of Aristophanes, this comedy combines ancient Greek and contemporary elements to point to the inspiration that nature can provide to the solution of human problems. Istotle speaks to Diktyophanes about three problems that threaten to destroy the world – the extinction of acrobats, the nightmares babies are having, and the staggering amount of information produced daily. Spiderman presents himself as deux ex macbina claiming that he can solve all three problems. Answering Istotle and Diktyophanes’ questions, he informs them that he runs a shop on Acharnnon street, where his workers (the Spiders) work tirelessly for the good of humanity. Spiderman goes to the shop and interrupts the Spiders, who are talking about their amorous adventures during the weekend. He asks them to get to work for a great cause. For their part, they weave three objects designed to solve all three problems – a safety net, a dream-catcher, and the World Wide Web

    Fatal Injuries and Nonfatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses Involving Insects, Arachnids, and Mites

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    [Excerpt] This issue of Beyond the Numbers article examines fatal and nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses related to insects, arachnids, and mites using data from two Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) sources: the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) and the Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII). CFOI data used here are from 2003 to 2010 and aggregated to support extended analysis. SOII data are from 2008 to 2010. BLS began publishing national SOII estimates for state and local government in 2008, so that period was chosen to keep the coverage of CFOI and SOII data in this study as comparable as possible. For this article, the term insects refers to the entire category, for short

    The Notostigmata, a new suborder of Acari

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    The following studies on this new suborder have been made on material included in the famous French Arachnologist E. Simon's rich collection and lent by him to Drs. H. J. Hansen and W. Sørensen. ..

    Endemic harvestmen and spiders of Austria (Arachnida: Opiliones, Araneae)

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    A comprehensive overview of plant, fungus and animal species of Austria revealed a total of 748 endemic and subendemic species, including, 11 harvestman and 46 spider species. Altogether two endemic harvestmen (Nemastoma bidentatum relictum, Nemastoma schuelleri) and 8 endemic spiders (Abacoproeces molestus, Collinsia (caliginosa) nemenziana, Mughiphantes severus, Mughiphantes styriacus, Pelecopsis alpica, Scotophaeus nanus, Troglohyphantes novicordis, Troglohyphantes tauriscus), beside 9 subendemic harvestman and 38 subendemic spider species have been recorded from Austria. Hot-spots of endemism in the Eastern Alps are the north-eastern (Ennstaler Alps) and southern Calcareous Alps (Karawanken, Karnische Alps) and the Central Alps (Hohe Tauern, Gurktaler Alps, Ötztaler and Stubaier Alps). Most of the endemic arachnid species occur from the nival down to the montane zone. Important habitats are rocky areas, caves and woodlands. High absolute numbers and percentages of endemics can be found within the harvestman families Cladonychiidae, Ischyropsalididae and Nemastomatidae and in the spider genera Lepthyphantes s. l. and Troglohyphantes. The conservation status of these highly endangered taxa – 85 % of the spider species and 100 % of the harvestman taxa are endangered in Austria – is poor

    Identification and Characterization of the Lipid Transport System in the Tarantula Grammostola rosea

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    Lipids due to its hydrophobic nature are transported in the hemolymph mainly by lipoproteic fractions. In the present work we studied the lipoproteic fractions present in the hemolymph of the spider Grammostola rosea. Through ultracentrifugation two lipoproteic fractions are isolated, one of high density named Gr-HDL (δ = 1.13 - 1.15 g/ml) and the other of very high density called Gr-VHDL (δ = 1.24 - 1.27 g/ml) Gr-VHDL in hemolymph is majority in relation to Gr-HDL. In this sense Gr-VHDL fraction has 98.6% of hemolymphatic proteins, and 89.3% of lipids presents in the hemolymph. Both lipoproteic fractions possess phospholipids such as majority lipids (phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine) and 18:1, 16:0, 18:2 and 18:0 as the major fatty acids. In order to confirm the role played by lipoproteic fractions in vitro assays with different 14C-lipid were performed. It was observed that Gr-VHDL takes up mainly free fatty acids and triacylglycerols unlike that observed for Gr-HDL in relation to phosphatidylcholine. Through electrophoresis it was observed that Gr-VHDL has three proteins: a predominant band of 68 kDa and two others of 99 and 121 kDa. Gr-HDL displayed a predominant band of 93 kDa, and other minority of 249 kDa. In conclusion, this study reports lipid characterization of the lipoproteic fractions present in the hemolymph of the tarantula, G. rosea. The role of each lipoproteic fraction in relation to lipid up- take is sustained by in vitro assays. Similarities and differences are found when it is compared to lipoproteins of only the three species of spiders studied.Fil: Laino, Aldana. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Conicet - La Plata. Instituto de Investigaciones Bioquímicas de La Plata ; ArgentinaFil: Cunningham, Monica Liliana. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Conicet - La Plata. Instituto de Investigaciones Bioquímicas de La Plata ; ArgentinaFil: Suarez, Gustavo. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Conicet - La Plata. Instituto de Investigaciones Bioquímicas de La Plata ; ArgentinaFil: Garcia, Carlos Fernando. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Conicet - La Plata. Instituto de Investigaciones Bioquímicas de La Plata ; Argentin

    The sejugal furrow in camel spiders and acariform mites

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    Camel spiders (Arachnida: Solifugae) are one of the arachnid groups characterised by a prosomal dorsal shield composed of three distinct elements: the pro-, meso- and metapeltidium. These are associated respectively with prosomal appendages one to four, five, and six. What is less well known, although noted in the historical literature, is that the coxae of the 4th and 5th prosomal segments (i.e. walking legs 2 and 3) of camel spiders are also separated ventrally by a distinct membranous region, which is absent between the coxae of the other legs. We suggest that this essentially ventral division of the prosoma specifically between coxae 2 and 3 is homologous with the so-called sejugal furrow (the sejugal interval sensu van der Hammen). This division constitutes a fundamental part of the body plan in acariform mites (Arachnida: Acariformes). If homologous, this sejugal furrow could represent a further potential synapomorphy for (Solifugae + Acariformes); a relationship with increasing morphological and molecular support. Alternatively, outgroup comparison with sea spiders (Pycnogonida) and certain early Palaeozoic fossils could imply that the sejugal furrow defines an older tagma, derived from a more basal grade of organisation. In this scenario the (still) divided prosoma of acariform mites and camel spiders would be plesiomorphic. This interpretation challenges the textbook arachnid character of a peltidium (or ‘carapace’) covering an undivided prosoma

    Jörg Wunderlich (ed.) (2012): Fifteen papers on extant and fossil spiders (Araneae)

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    This book consists of fifteen papers (considered below as Chapters) on fossil and extant arachnids, mostly spiders. Most papers are written by the editor, two papers in cooperation with Peter Jäger and with Søren Toft, and a single one by Peter Jäger. Chapters 1 and 2 are identification keys to the European genera of the families Zodariidae and Corinnidae, respectively

    Climatic vulnerabilities and ecological preferences of soil invertebrates across biomes.

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    Unlike plants and vertebrates, the ecological preferences, and potential vulnerabilities of soil invertebrates to environmental change, remain poorly understood in terrestrial ecosystems globally. We conducted a cross-biome survey including 83 locations across six continents to advance our understanding of the ecological preferences and vulnerabilities of the diversity of dominant and functionally important soil invertebrate taxa, including nematodes, arachnids and rotifers. The diversity of invertebrates was analyzed through amplicon sequencing. Vegetation and climate drove the diversity and dominant taxa of soil invertebrates. Our results suggest that declines in forest cover and plant diversity, and reductions in plant production associated with increases in aridity, can result in reductions of the diversity of soil invertebrates in a drier and more managed world. We further developed global atlases of the diversity of these important soil invertebrates, which were cross-validated using an independent database. Our study advances the current knowledge of the ecological preferences and vulnerabilities of the diversity and presence of functionally important soil invertebrates in soils from across the globe. This information is fundamental for improving and prioritizing conservation efforts of soil genetic resources and management policies

    Australasian Arachnology, Number 70, December 2004

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    This is it, my first issue! As Tracey announced in the editorial of the last Australasian Arachnology, it’s now my turn ‘at the helm’ of our newsletter. Everybody will agree that Tracey did a tremendous job over the last five years, editing 15 wonderful issues (numbers 55 – 69). Parallels of the current change to her take-over from Mark Harvey as previous editor are evident. As then Mark, Tracey embraces a new role as parent and her increasing family duties do not allow as many arachnological activities at this stage
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