1,431,203 research outputs found

    Francis Murray Mack Sr. Papers - Accession 533

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    The Francis Murray Mack, Sr. Papers are divided into eight sections. The first section consists of his educational papers and the organization of the Catawba Association. The second section includes papers relating to the Ministers’ Annuity Fund. Other sections include his military papers which include his military papers which include numerous maps, papers concerning Camp Campbell and Korea, papers dealing with historical organizations of which he was a member, photographs, newspaper clippings and various pamphlets. There are three appendices which list the names of the pamphlets and the maps and also list the organizations that Francis M. Mack, Sr. was a member.https://digitalcommons.winthrop.edu/manuscriptcollection_findingaids/1636/thumbnail.jp

    Francis Murray Mack Sr. Papers - Accession 1631

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    The Francis Murray Mack, Sr. Papers consist of a certificate from the governor of South Carolina, ledgers, books on military instruction and training, newspaper clippings, letters, army certificates, books concerning Mr. Mack’s fraternity (Sigma Alpha Epsilon), a family Bible (1851), various college publications, maps of South Carolina, church publications, historical publications, family genealogical papers, and manuals on the operation of machinery.https://digitalcommons.winthrop.edu/manuscriptcollection_findingaids/2636/thumbnail.jp

    Drummond Family Military Uniforms Collection - Accession 1572

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    The Drummond Family Military Uniforms Collection consists of uniforms worn by Warren Howell Drummond (1889-1950) and James Drummond. Warren Howell Drummond served in the US Navy during World War I and the collection contains his jacket, belt and pants. James Drummond served in the US Army during World War II and the collection contains green wool trench coat, pants, cap, uniform jackets, vest, and colored shirts. The Drummond family is from Woodruff, South Carolina.https://digitalcommons.winthrop.edu/manuscriptcollection_findingaids/2628/thumbnail.jp

    The World War II Patriotic Mother

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    The archetypal good mother and the archetypal patriotic mother are important symbols in American culture. Both are rooted in maternal work but are separated by two conflicting assumptions. The good mother nurtures her children and protects them from harm, while the patriotic wartime mother remains silent when the government sends her child directly into harm\u27s way. This study explores how the World War II press positioned mothers of soldiers to sacrifice their children in support of the nation\u27s war effort. The findings point to the importance of understanding the role of archetypes in news narratives

    French Naval Aviation in the United States

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    A memorandum from Le Capitaine de Fregate de SCITIVAUX de GREISCHE Commandant l\u27 Aeronautique Navale aux Etas-Unis discussing the training of French military pilots by Embry-Riddle at Homestead AFB

    Women and World War II at Gettysburg College

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    An examination of the women attending Gettysburg College during World War II. This project examined what the women did and experienced during the World War II, along with analyzing campus culture and life

    The Political Economy of War Debts and Inflation

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    This paper argues that before World War II the desire to maintain a trustworthy reputation for honoring war debts was an important factor in inducing deflationary postwar monetary policies in both the United Kingdom and the United States. The paper then asks why this policy objective did not serve to induce either a deflationary monetary policy or the honoring in full of war debts following World War II. The discussion focuses on differences in economic and political conditions after World War II, especially the extension of the voting franchise, the increased economic and political power of organized labor, and, perhaps most importantly, the large postwar demands on national resources with which the servicing of World-War-II debts had to compete. The analysis also argues that, because these postwar developments were unforeseeable, but verifiable, contingencies, the partial default on World-War-II debts was excusable and, accordingly, did not cause either the United Kingdom or the United States to lose its trustworthy reputation.

    The Lover\u27s Cup

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    This documentary film, The Lover\u27s Cup is the story of a former Naval Officer from World War II, Dr. Phillip Trapp, who took Marines into the battle of Iwo Jima and lived to see the flag being raised on Mt. Suribachi. This 55-minute film explores his life experiences before, during and following World War II. His first-hand experiences are used to illustrate the Social and psychological impact of the Great Depression and World War II and his journey to overcome his adversity and create positive changes in the world through his subsequent education and service at the University of Arkansas and the community of Northwest Arkansas. The Lover\u27s Cup explores some of the factors, which helped shape what many have called The Greatest Generation. It also addresses the political and psychological ramifications of World War II and it\u27s differences to modern day world conflict. The film includes several interviews over the course of two years with Dr. Trapp. It also includes some re-enactments and extensive archival footage and photographs through the National Archives and Library of Congress. This is a character-driven narrative, using the Great Depression and World War II as vehicles to tell the story. The goal of this film is to help generate a renewed awareness, understanding and appreciation of the Greatest Generation, who will all soon be gone

    第二次大戦前における英国企業の日本進出

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    8. Road to World War II (1931-1939)

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    In the history of international relations, the 1920\u27s are characterized by tidying up after the war to make the world safe for democracy; the 1930\u27s, by preparations for World War II. In general, the causes of the renewal of global war are the same as those listed earlier for World War I, with several major additions. [excerpt
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