3,603 research outputs found

    Violence in the Workplace

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    Domestic Violence in the Workplace

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    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a pervasive problem that follows victims from the home into the workplace. Many women who experience violence in their homes are also harassed at work and are abused in the workplace. For the current study, thirty women who reported a history of workplace violence were recruited from a homeless women’s shelter. Of the participants, thirteen experienced domestic violence in the workplace, and this paper focuses on the results obtained from those thirteen respondents. This paper also discusses the link between poverty and homelessness, intimate partner violence, and workplace violence

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    Workplace violence prevention and systems management

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    Violence in the workplace has become a major concern to labor, business, and government. In the past ten years, between 600 and 1000 work related deaths have been attributed to homicide. The repercussions of non-fatal aggression and violence in the workplace are not yet clear. What is clear is that all organizations are at some degree of risk and that regulatory and legal requirements dictate that preventive action be taken to protect employees, other stakeholders and the public from workplace violence. This thesis posits that by using a systems management approach along with the techniques of quality management, instances of workplace violence, within an organization, can be prevented, reduced or mitigated

    Reducing Violence in the Workplace: A Quality Improvement Project

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    Abstract BACKGROUND: Violence in the United States has significant impacts on the healthcare system. On average, there are about 7.8 per 1,000 workers yearly that experience violent injuries (Grossman & Choucair, 2019). In 2016, it was estimated that approximately $429 million was added to treat and prevent injuries to healthcare workers (Grossman & Choucair, 2019). By implementing the Broset Violence Checklist (BVC) as a screening tool for early identification of risk for violence, there is a possibility for a reduction in the number of violent occurrences in the workplace. LOCAL PROBLEM: Within the given microsystem, there is a lack of education regarding violent behaviors resulting in an increase in violent occurrences in the workplace. The specific aim of the project was to decrease the number of violent occurrences in the microsystem by 50%. METHODS: Utilizing the Plan-Do-Study-Act model, a pre-/post-test survey design with accompanying educational materials was provided to healthcare staff in the microsystem. Responses for both pre-test and post-test surveys were analyzed to examine not only the effectiveness of the Broset Violence Checklist but staff perception of safety in the microsystem. INTERVENTIONS: An educational component was presented asynchronously on workplace violence and the use of the BVC for early identification of risk. RESULTS: Data analysis indicates an increase in staff perception of safety, and an overall decrease in physical and verbal assaults in the microsystem. Prior to the implementation of the BVC, 83% of staff reported that if they encountered a violent situation, they would have the necessary tools and education to handle the situation properly and effectively. Following the intervention, this number increased to 94%. Physical assaults prior to implementation were 83%, which decreased to 66% following the intervention. Verbal assaults prior to implementation were 100%, which decreased to 88% following the intervention. Overall, the implementation of the BVC was successful in reducing violence in the workplace. CONCLUSIONS: The Broset Violence Checklist was an effective tool in reducing violence in the workplace. Staff members reported a decrease in physical and verbal assaults after the implementation. Also reported, was an increase in perception of safety in the microsystem. Keywords: Broset violence checklist, workplace violence, mental health, violence, nursing staff, quality improvemen

    Identifying potential factors related to violence in the workplace

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    Nursing has been said to be a stressful environment. To remain profitable, hospitals may find it necessary to decrease available staffing. Not only can this increase tension among personnel but safety becomes a concern. The focus of this study is to identify potentially violent situations within the workplace particularly in the mental health inpatient setting and identify successful intervention. A literature review will be performed to examine previous studies involving the violent situations, their severity, and successful intervention that were appropriate. Data will be collected by interviewing ten nursing staff members who have experienced violence situations in psychiatric wards. The sample of ten nurses will be derived from staff nurses inpatient psychiatric units located at the VA Medical Center located in Leeds, MA. Nurses will be asked the open-ended question “tell me about the violent situation you experienced with mental health patients.” In addition, health records of documentations of violent situations that occurred in the past will be reviewed. Situations reviewed will be involving adult individuals primarily with psychiatric admissions to hospitals who have committed an act of violence or aggression towards nursing staff. The benefits to this study will be a better understanding the impact violence has on nurses and identifying strategies for reducing violence the workplace.Thesis (M.S.)School of Nursin

    Economic effects of mobbing and violence in the workplace

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    The aim of this research is to comprehensively determine the monetary losses caused by mobbing and violence in the workplace in Poland, based on macroeconomic data for 2017 and own investigation. After determining the scale of mobbing and the effects of mobbing on the employees, the monetary value of losses generated at the individual, organizational and social level was determined. It was found that the value of these losses ranged from 2.07% to 4.59% of the total GDP of Poland. The biggest costs of mobbing were incurred by enterprises, and their share in total costs amounted over 77%
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