44 research outputs found

    The Kimberlins Go To War: A Union Family in Copperhead Country

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    Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)The Kimblerlin Family, first white settlers of Scott County, Indiana is used as a focal point to study the impact of the Copperhead movement on southern Indiana during the Civil War. The author has been granted acces to dozens of family letters, to and from the battlefield, that have never been subjected to academic scrutiny. They provide a fascinating mirror that reflects cultural attitudes toward the War, and ultimately, the courage it took to stand firmly for the Union in Copperhead country.This is the story of the Kimberlin Family that sent 33 fathers and sons, brothers and cousins to fight for the Union cause during the Civil War. Ten family members were killed, wounded, or died of battlefield disease, a 30 percent casualty rate that is unmatched in recorded Scott County history. Of the 134 known deaths of Scott County soldiers, ten were members of the Kimberlin clan. While we know that the Kimberlins suffered disproportionately, our only clues to their feelings about the war come from 40 letters to and from the battlefield that have survived to this day. Were they fighting to save the Union or to free the slaves? How did they express grief over the loss of a brother? Did they keep up with their business and the women at home? And what did they think about “secesh” neighbors in southern Indiana who tried to undermine the Union cause? The answers to these questions will help determine if the Kimberlins were unusual in their patriotism or simply acting as any Union family would in an area of the nation known as Copperhead Countr

    Major general Robert Frederick Hoke and the Civil War in North Carolina

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    The Annals of Iowa, Spring 2009, Vol. 68, no. 2

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    A quarterly journal of Iowa authors and their works produced by State Historical Society of Iowa

    Message from the President of the United States to the two Houses of Congress and Accompanying Documents, at the commencement of the second session of the Thirty-ninth Congress : Report of the Secretary of War, 1866

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    Annual Message to Congress with Documents; Pres. Johnson. 3 Dec. HED 1, 39-2, vl-4, 3701p. [1281-1286] Treaties with Indian tribes; annual report of the Sec. of War (Serial 1285); annual report of the Sec. of Interior (Serial 1284); annual report of the Gen. Land Office (Serial1284); annual report of the CIA (Serial 1284), including taxation of Indian land, trust funds and trust lands, population of tribes, farming statistics, and reports of Supts., agents, and schools; etc

    Studies in Rio Grande Valley history

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    Historia de Valle Hermoso, Tamaulipas / por Ernesto Escribano Gómez -- How the teachers of Matamoros formed la Union Tamaulipeca / by Alma Ortiz -- The 1971 Pharr Riot / by Ned Wallace -- Memoirs of Brownsville politics / by Loddell Batsell -- Economic changes in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas: a bibliographic review / by David J. Mycue -- A short history of land titles in South Texas / by Joseph E. Chance -- The prehistoric peoples of the Rio Grande Delta and their connections with the cultures of Mesoamerica / by Rolando L. Garza -- Peyote: sacred sacrament of the Rio Grande Valley / by Thomas Britten -- Twin cities on a river: a reminiscence and comparison / by Anthony Knopp -- The signs of Brownsville / by Mimosa Stephenson -- Charrería en Matamoros / por Oralia Garcia -- German immigrants in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, 1850-1920: a demographic overview / by Gerhard Grytz -- A history of the Muslim community in the Rio Grande Valley / by Milo Kearney and Mark Hanson -- From old to new: the alteration, restoration, and preservation of historical Fort Brown buildings of the University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College / by Javier R. García -- Brownsville and The Herald in the 1940s / by Cipriano A. Cárdenas -- Brownsville\u27s Casa Petrina / by Milo Kearney -- Recent Valley literature: the South Texas Mexican set / by René Saldaña, Jr. -- Israel B. Bigelow: from Connecticut to the Rio Grande / by Bill Young -- Menton Murray Sr. and Betty Murray of Harlingen: a legacy of public service / by John Hawthorne -- Mayor and commissioner Henry Gonzalez / by James W. Mills -- Porfirio Díaz in the Lower Rio Grande Valley during the rebellion of Tuxtepec / by John D. Kearney -- Coronel Eleuterio Reyna García: vida de un revolucionario Matamorense / por Miguel Rubiano -- Stephen Powers: master Mason, master citizen / by Douglas Collins -- The Chiltons: eighty years in the Valley / by Carl Chilton, Jr. -- From the inside out: truancy to prison on the streets of Brownsville / by Joe Garcia -- Colored death: the tragedy of black troops on the Lower Rio Grande 1864-1906 / by Antonio N. Zavaleta -- Dr. William C. Gorgas and yellow fever at Fort Brown / by Charles M. Robinson III -- José M. Lopez: un hombre valiente / by Manuel Medrano -- The clay dunes of eastern Cameron County / by Norman L. Richard.https://scholarworks.utrgv.edu/regionalhist/1005/thumbnail.jp

    Peter Ruffner and his Descendants

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    Juneau County, Wisconsin Bygdebok: A Genealogy of the Norwegian Settlers, 1850-1950

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    Mission of a Meddler: Mixed Matters of Class, Gender, and Race in Mary Church Terrell\u27s Model of Elite Black Female Activism

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    In The Mission of Meddlers, published in 1905 in The Voice of the Negro, Mary Church Terrell called to action a cadre of change agents who dared to ask prejudiced, cast-ridden bigots by what right they humiliate and harass their fellowmen simply on account of a difference in color, class or races. As the privileged daughter of Robert Reed Church, Sr., hailed as the Souths first black millionaire, Terrell upon completion of college could easily have complied with her fathers wishes to have her reside at his Memphis mansion and enjoy the genteel lifestyle of a Southern belle. She chose instead to use her mettle as an elite black woman to combat gender bias and race discrimination. The goal of this dissertation is to illustrate how Terrell, meddler on a mission, did not merely react to gender and racial inequality but consistently dictated through transformative leadership the very direction of the national dialogue for the enacting, enabling, and enforcing of federal protective legislation. Terrells autobiography, A Colored Woman in a White World, is supplemented with newspaper articles, excerpts from her diary, reflections from selected contemporaries, Congressional records, and court cases to analyze how her ancestry, affluence, and academic training gave dimensionality, or multifaceted layers, to her class stature. These sources also show how Terrell crafted female concentricity, or common circles with diverse female groups, by building self-help networks with elite black clubwomen; providing community service to poor black women; and forging political alliances with white suffragists. Stuart Hall, the late black British cultural theorist, wrote in a 1978 study that race is the modality in which class is lived. This dissertation argues that transforming the modality of race was the greatest roadblock that Terrell faced in implementing her mission as a meddler; indeed, race was the window through which both class and gender were viewed. Terrells class standing did not exempt her from racial bias, and even elite black women by virtue of their race were not considered ladies. Terrell fought racial inequality through her intrepid service as a liaison with Frederick Douglass in their 1993 White House visit that drew national attention to lynching; as lobbyist on behalf of the Brownsville soldiers dismissed without due process in 1906; and as launchpad for the chartering of the NAACP in 1909. Terrells picketing of Washington, D.C. segregated public accommodations in the 1950s as an octogenarian with the lost laws as her basis was the capstone of her long and fruitful career as a meddler. Terrell remained resolute that the thorny issue of race often overshadowed her class standing and proved darker in tone than gender bias. Though she was a colored woman in a white world determined to limit her to a separate sphere and within racial boundaries, this dissertation will show that Terrell through her writings, speeches, and direct action campaigns led the vanguard of black activists determined to dictate a different direction

    An Author Catalog of Disciples of Christ And Related Religious Groups

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    https://digitalcommons.acu.edu/crs_books/1370/thumbnail.jp
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