931 research outputs found

    Southwestern Plants

    Get PDF

    Describing the Flora of the United States: Botanies at Libraries in Syracuse

    Get PDF
    The first written descriptions of the flora of North America were those of sixteenth-century Europeans who marvelled at the botanical treasures brought to them by explorers of the New World. The earliest account of American natural history was that of the English botanical explorer Thomas Hariot who wrote his Briefe and True Re, port of the New Found Land of Virginia in 1590 after returning from an expedition arranged by Sir Walter Raleigh. Hariot carried to En, gland tubers, fruits, and seeds of plants previously unknown in Europe. Perhaps thirty different plant species had been introduced into Europe from the New World by 1600, most of these valued for their practical uses or unusual properties. Pumpkin, persimmon, potato, sunflower, mulberry, sassafras, arborvitae, maize, chestnut, black walnut, and tobacco found their way to Old World gardens

    William Martin Smallwood and the Smallwood Collection in Natural History at the Syracuse University Library

    Get PDF
    This article details the life and efforts of Syracuse Professor William Smallwood to collect major works on many of the major disciplines of science. Together the Smallwood collection provides a wonderful resource for the history of science and natural history

    Torreyana Centennial Tribute

    Get PDF
    I was only eleven years old, but the impression made was lasting. I've never tired of the beauty, vistas and the freedom offered here. We celebrate 100 years of preserving this precious resource, and our main goal is to provide everyone with a cherished memory that will bring you back again and again. The 100-year anniversary of Torrey Pines State Reserve will be celebrated as a free aliday event on Saturday, October 9. Shuttle service from both beach parking lots to the Lodge will be provided. The Californi

    S. W. Williams\u27 Relations with Asa Gray: Lifelong Friendship, Botany and Sinology

    Get PDF
    Samuel Wells Williams was a well-known missionary, diplomat and sinologist. In his whole life, he never gave up his pursuit on botany, however, there was not much attention to his botanical accomplishment. Williams had a lifelong friendship with Asa Gray, who was the most distinguished American botanist in the 19th century. And because of the contact, Williams related with botany indeed. In order to figure out their friendship and influence, this article is going to use the correspondences between Williams and Gray, besides the related publications. This article first presents Williams\u27 lifelong friendship with Gray, then, accounts for the plants and seeds which Williams gave to Gray. Finally, it will demonstrate the influence of Gray towards Williams\u27 contact with Ko Kun-hua, who was the first professor of Chinese descent at Harvard University.氏名の表記に一部誤記がありましたので訂正していま

    Philips, Emanie Louise (Nahm) Sachs Arling, 1893-1981 (MSS 317)

    Get PDF
    Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 317. Professional correspondence, short stories, book and story manuscripts, author\u27s notes, reviews, and primary and secondary research materials relating to the literary career of Emanie Louise Nahm Philips, a Bowling Green native. Includes some photographs, notices and reviews relating to her work as an artist, family biographical material, and personal correspondence

    Botanist and Plant Exploration on the Pacific Coast of North America: A Bibliography

    Get PDF

    An Educator Looks at Florida in 1884, A letter of Ashley D. Hurt to His Wife

    Get PDF
    Ashley Davis Hurt, first president of the Florida Agricultural College, was a native of Petersburg, Virginia (1834). He was educated at the University of Virginia, the University of Bonn, and received a Ph.D. degree from the University of Berlin. After serving in the Confederate Navy he became principal of the Louisville, Kentucky, high school. In the summer of 1884 he was appointed president of the newly established Florida Agricultural College at Lake City. Later he held the chair of Greek in Tulane University. Dr. Hurt died March 10, 1898. The original of the following letter was presented to the University of Florida by his daughter, Mrs. H. W. Robinson of New Orleans
    corecore