21,317 research outputs found

    Social ranking effects on tooth-brushing behaviour

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    Objective: A tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis is tested suggesting tooth-brushing duration is influenced when individuals position their behaviour in a rank when comparing their behaviour with other individuals. Design: Study 1 used a correlation design, Study 2 used a semi-experimental design, and Study 3 used a randomized intervention design to examine the tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis in terms of self-reported attitudes, cognitions, and behaviour towards tooth-brushing duration. Methods: Study 1 surveyed participants to examine whether the perceived health benefits of tooth-brushing duration could be predicted from the ranking of each person's tooth-brushing duration. Study 2 tested whether manipulating the rank position of the tooth-brushing duration influenced participant-perceived health benefits of tooth-brushing duration. Study 3 used a longitudinal intervention method to examine whether messages relating to the rank positions of tooth-brushing durations causally influenced the self-report tooth-brushing duration. Results: Study 1 demonstrates that perceptions of the health benefits from tooth-brushing duration are predicted by the perceptions of how that behaviour ranks in comparison to other people's behaviour. Study 2 demonstrates that the perceptions of the health benefits of tooth-brushing duration can be manipulated experimentally by changing the ranked position of a person's tooth-brushing duration. Study 3 experimentally demonstrates the possibility of increasing the length of time for which individuals clean their teeth by focusing on how they rank among their peers in terms of tooth-brushing duration. Conclusions: The effectiveness of interventions using social-ranking methods relative to those that emphasize comparisons made against group averages or normative guidelines are discussed

    Efficacy of Plaque Control by Tooth Brushing with and without Different Dentifrices: A Clinical Trial

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    Objective: Microbial plaque is among the main etiologies of periodontal disease, and tooth brushing with toothpaste is the most commonly used method of plaque control. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of tooth brushing with and without three different dentifrices.Methods: Thirty dental students were randomly selected to participate in this clinical trial and were asked to refrain from any plaque control measure for 24 hours. Candidates were then randomly assigned to one of the three groups of tooth brushing with Pooneh whitening toothpaste, Crest 3D White, Sensodyne Original and tooth brushing without toothpaste. Subjects were asked to brush their teeth for two minutes using the Bass technique. Plaque index was calculated before and after the intervention. This process was repeated until all subjects experienced all the understudy interventional protocols (tooth brushing with three different toothpastes and without toothpaste). Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA and paired t-test.Results: No statistically significant difference was noted in the efficacy of plaque control by tooth brushing with Crest 3D White and Sensodyne Original and tooth brushing without toothpaste; however, significant differences were noted in this respect between Pooneh toothpaste and the remaining three tooth brushing protocols (p≀0.001).Conclusion: Tooth brushing without toothpaste may have a plaque control efficacy equal or even higher than that of tooth brushing with toothpaste

    Relationship between handedness and toothbrush-related cervical dental abrasion in left- and right-handed individuals

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    AbstractBackground/purposeCervical tooth abrasion is the loss of tooth material at the cementoenamel junction, and is usually related to faulty brushing habits. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of handedness on tooth-brushing abrasion in terms of brushing habits in left- and right-handed adults.Materials and methodsIn total, 488 subjects participating in the study were divided into 2 groups according to hand preference (group I; left-handed and group II; right-handed), and were interviewed about their brushing habits, and their clinical oral conditions such as the plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), and tooth wear index (TWI) were determined. Handedness was determined by a questionnaire that focused on handedness using the Turkish version of the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory.ResultsThis study showed that there were no statistically significant differences between groups I and II according to daily tooth-brushing habits, PI, or GI. Statistically significant differences were found between men and women according to the clinical oral scores and brushing habits (P<0.01). However, there were no statistically significant differences between the mean TWI scores of left- and right-handed groups (P=0.12). It was found that an increased frequency and longer duration of tooth-brushing significantly increased the TWI scores in both groups (P<0.01). It was also found that TWI scores were statistically higher in subjects who brushed horizontally rather than vertically (P<0.01). Correlations between clinical oral scores (TWI, PI, and GI) and brushing habits were statistically significant (P<0.01).ConclusionThe oral-hygiene performance of females was better than males. Brushing habits of patients were related to the severity of cervical wear. But no statistically significant relationship was found between hand preference and tooth-brushing abrasion in this study

    Comparison of Saudi child versus parent‑report of child tooth‑brushing practices

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    Objective: This cross‑sectional study compared Saudi children’s tooth‑brushing practices as reported by children and parents and then matched the agreement of reports.Materials and Methods: A sample of 100 Saudi parents and their children of ages 8–12 years participated in this cross‑sectional investigation. A self‑administered structured questionnaire regarding the current tooth‑brushing practice and habits at home was filled by the child. The same questionnaire was filled independently by parents.Results: Mothers were more likely to teach children about tooth‑brushing and fathers were minimally helping children during tooth‑brushing. Mothers were the first to teach the children and approximately 33% of the children started brushing their teeth by age 5. Children and parents reported that children clean their teeth using a tooth‑brush (73.74% and 76.77%), miswak (5.05% and 5.05%), or both (21.21% and 18.18%), respectively.Conclusions: There was some agreement between reported tooth‑brushing practice of children and their parents. It is important to question both the child and parent regarding oral hygiene practice and compare their answers to get more broad knowledge about their practices. Approximately, one‑third of the children started brushing their teeth by age 5, which differs from recommended oral hygiene practices.Keywords: Dental plaque, oral health education, oral hygiene, patient education, tooth‑brushin

    Efficacy of power-driven interdental cleaning tools: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    OBJECTIVES To summarize the available evidence on the efficacy of power-driven interdental cleaning tools (PDICTs) as an adjunct to tooth brushing compared to tooth brushing alone or tooth brushing combined with any other non-PDICT in terms of interproximal plaque and gingival bleeding reduction in gingivitis patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS A systematic literature search was performed in three databases until March 20, 2022 with the following main eligibility criteria: (1) randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) with (2) at least 28 days of follow-up in (3) gingivitis patients. Interproximal plaque and bleeding values were defined as the primary outcome variables and used for pair-wise meta-analyses. RESULTS Sixteen RCTs were identified including data from 1258 participants at the final evaluation. Eight studies each investigated the effect of either a liquid-based or mechanical PDICT; one of these studies tested additionally a combined liquid-based and mechanical PDICT. Tooth brushing combined with a liquid-based PDICT compared to tooth brushing alone did not result in better interproximal plaque values but in significantly lower interproximal bleeding values. Tooth brushing combined with either a liquid-based PDICT or with a mechanical PDICT compared to tooth brushing and flossing achieved comparable interproximal plaque and bleeding values. The majority of studies reporting on patient compliance/preference favored the use of a PDICT, and except for a single study, which was reporting soft tissue trauma in two subjects from improper use of a mechanical PDICT, none of the studies reported adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Daily use of PDICT as an adjunct to tooth brushing significantly reduces interproximal bleeding. This effect appears comparable to that of flossing, while PDICT may achieve higher patient acceptance/compliance

    Comparison between observed children's tooth brushing habits and those reported by mothers

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    <p>Abstract</p> <p>Background</p> <p>Information bias can occur in epidemiological studies and compromise scientific outcomes, especially when evaluating information given by a patient regarding their own health. The oral habits of children reported by their mothers are commonly used to evaluate tooth brushing practices and to estimate fluoride intake by children. The aim of the present study was to compare observed tooth-brushing habits of young children using fluoridated toothpaste with those reported by mothers.</p> <p>Methods</p> <p>A sample of 201 mothers and their children (aged 24-48 months) from Montes Claros, Brazil, took part in a cross-sectional study. At day-care centres, the mothers answered a self-administered questionnaire on their child's tooth-brushing habits. The structured questionnaire had six items with two to three possible answers. An appointment was then made with each mother/child pair at day-care centres. The participants were asked to demonstrate the tooth-brushing practice as usually performed at home. A trained examiner observed and documented the procedure. Observed tooth brushing and that reported by mothers were compared for overall agreement using Cohen's Kappa coefficient and the McNemar test.</p> <p>Results</p> <p>Cohen's Kappa values comparing mothers' reports and tooth brushing observed by the examiner ranged from poor-to-good (0.00-0.75). There were statistically significant differences between observed tooth brushing habits and those reported by mothers (p < 0.001). When observed by the examiner, the frequencies of dentifrice dispersed on all bristles (35.9%), children who brushed their teeth alone (33.8%) and those who did not rinse their mouths during brushing (42.0%) were higher than those reported by the mothers (12.1%, 18.9% and 6.5%, respectively; p < 0.001).</p> <p>Conclusions</p> <p>In general, there was low agreement between observed tooth brushing and mothers' reports. Moreover, the different methods of estimation resulted in differences in the frequencies of tooth brushing habits, indicative of reporting bias. Data regarding children's tooth-brushing habits as reported by mothers should be considered with caution in epidemiological surveys on fluoridated dentifrice use and the risk of dental fluorosis.</p

    Meta-analysis on the association between the frequency of tooth brushing and diabetes mellitus risk

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    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Epidemiological studies suggested that the frequency of tooth brushing might be associated with the risk of diabetes mellitus (DM), but the results were inconsistent and no systematic review was conducted to focus on this topic. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized available observational epidemiological evidences to identify the association between tooth brushing and DM risk and investigate the potential dose-response relationship of them. METHODS: We searched PubMed and Embase from their inception through December 2017 to identify observational studies examining the association between tooth brushing and the risk of DM. Reference lists from retrieved articles were also reviewed. We quantitatively combined results of the included studies using a random-effects model. Dose-response meta-analysis was conducted to further examine the effect of tooth brushing frequency on DM risk. RESULTS: We identified 20 relevant studies (one cohort study, 14 case-control studies, and five cross-sectional studies) involving161,189 participants and 10,884 patients with DM. Compared with the highest tooth brushing frequency, the lowest level was significantly associated with an increased risk of DM (OR 1.32, 95% CI: 1.19 to 1.47), and there was no significant heterogeneity across the included studies (P = 0.119, I2 = 28.1%). Exclusion of any single study did not materially alter the combined risk estimate. The dose-response analysis indicated that the summary odds of DM for an increment of one time of tooth brushing per day was 1.20 (95% CI: 1.16-1.24). CONCLUSIONS: Integrated epidemiological evidence supports the hypothesis that low frequency of tooth brushing may be a risk factor of DM, and lower frequencies of tooth brushing were significantly associated with higher risk of DM

    Tooth brushing, tongue cleaning and snacking behaviour of dental technology and therapist students

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    Objective: To determine the tooth brushing, tongue cleaning and snacking behaviour of dental technology and therapist students. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study of students of Federal School of Dental Therapy and Technology Enugu, Nigeria. Self-administered questionnaire was used to obtain information on demography, frequency, duration and technique of tooth brushing and tongue cleaning as well as information on consumption of snacks. Results: A total of 242 students responded. Dental technology students made up 52.5% of the respondents and dental therapist in training made up 47.5%. Majority (63.2%) of the respondents considered the strength of tooth brush when purchasing a tooth brush and 78.9% use tooth brushes with medium strength. Seven-tenth (71.9%) of the respondents brush their teeth twice daily and 52.1% brush for 3&#x2013;5 minutes. About one-third (30.2%) brush their teeth in front of a mirror. Chewing stick was used by 51.7% of respondents in addition to the use of tooth brush. Tongue cleaning was done by 94.2% with only 9.5% using a tongue cleaner. Only 20.2% reported regular snacks consumption. Nine-tenth (90.4%) of respondents were previously involved in educating others, apart from their colleagues, on tooth brushing. Conclusion: This survey revealed that most of the dental therapy and technology students had satisfactory tooth-brushing behaviour. The zeal to educate others about proper tooth brushing revealed in this study suggests that the students may be helpful in oral health promotion

    Tooth brushing, tongue cleaning and snacking behaviour of dental technology and therapist students

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    Objective: To determine the tooth brushing, tongue cleaning and snacking behaviour of dental technology and therapist students. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study of students of Federal School of Dental Therapy and Technology Enugu, Nigeria. Self-administered questionnaire was used to obtain information on demography, frequency, duration and technique of tooth brushing and tongue cleaning as well as information on consumption of snacks. Results: A total of 242 students responded. Dental technology students made up 52.5% of the respondents and dental therapist in training made up 47.5%. Majority (63.2%) of the respondents considered the strength of tooth brush when purchasing a tooth brush and 78.9% use tooth brushes with medium strength. Sevententh (71.9%) of the respondents brush their teeth twice daily and 52.1% brush for 3-5 minutes. About onethird (30.2%) brush their teeth in front of a mirror. Chewing stick was used by 51.7% of respondents in addition to the use of tooth brush. Tongue cleaning was done by 94.2% with only 9.5% using a tongue cleaner. Only 20.2% reported regular snacks consumption. Nine-tenth (90.4%) of respondents were previously involved in educating others, apart from their colleagues, on tooth brushing. Conclusion: This survey revealed that most of the dental therapy and technology students had satisfactory tooth-brushing behaviour. The zeal to educate others about proper tooth brushing revealed in this study suggests that the students may be helpful in oral health promotion.Keywords: toothbrushing; tongue cleaning; snacking behaviour; dental auxiliary students; Nigeri

    Parent's self-reported tooth brushing and use of fluoridated toothpaste: Associations with their one-year-old child's preventive oral health behaviour

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    Objective The aim of the study was to examine if the tooth brushing frequency and use of fluoridated toothpaste of the mother and father were associated with the tooth brushing frequency and use of fluoridated toothpaste for their 1-year-old child. Methods This cross-sectional study is part of the FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study. Questionnaire data were obtained from 1672 mothers and 867 fathers on tooth brushing and use of fluoridated toothpaste, age, education, number of siblings and parity (when the child was 1-year-old). For 763 families (mother and father), data from both parents were available. Tooth brushing was dichotomized to at least twice daily (2× day) and less than 2× day, and use of fluoridated toothpaste for child to at least once daily and less than once daily. The association between brushing of child's teeth (both parents less than 2× day) and use of fluoridated toothpaste for the child (both parents less than once daily) with parent's own tooth brushing was modelled with logistic regression analyses adjusted for family-related variables (parents' age and education, number of older siblings) using odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Families in which both parents brushed their own teeth less than 2× day were more likely to brush their child's teeth less than 2× day than families in which both parents brushed their own teeth 2× day (OR = 9.23; 95%CI = 5.42–15.69). The likelihood of not brushing the child's teeth 2× day was less strong when at least one of the parents brushed his/her own teeth 2× day (mother 2× day: OR = 1.97; 95%CI = 1.25–3.10; father 2× day: OR = 2.85; 95%CI = 1.51–5.40). Conclusions Less frequent tooth brushing of both mothers and fathers was strongly associated with less frequent tooth brushing of their child. When educating parents on child oral home care, parents' own home care and inclusion of fathers also need more attention.publishedVersio
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