218,234 research outputs found

    THE ROMAN COLONIZATION OF BRITAIN: TWO POETIC INSIGHTS

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    The poem draws on different translations of the description ofthe Battle of Mons Graupius by Tacitus the Roman historian.The account is found in Agricola, the eponymous biography ofJulia’s father, Gnaeus Julius Agricola, a Gallo-Roman militarycommander, pontiff and governor of Britannia. The battle took placein northern Britain in AD 83. Tacitus depicts the battle as endingresistance to the Roman conquest of Britain

    Seasons in the sun: the battle for Britain, 1974-1979

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    Seasons in the Sun is a lively and attractively written account of Britain in the mid to late 1970s, covering all the political and cultural highlights and low days that readers might expect. Paul Brighton notes that although it shouldn’t be taken as the last word on the era of Wilson and Callaghan, it is witty, wide-ranging and much more than a “book of the TV series”. Seasons in the Sun: The Battle for Britain, 1974-1979. Dominic Sandbrook. Allen Lane. April 2012

    Abstract fo Symposium: Battle of Quiberon Bay

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    This project is about studying British history in the 18th century. This specific project talks about the Battle of Quiberon Bay. One thing that I would like to talk about with this battle is why Britain did not give this battle, which was a turning point, the major recognition that it deserves

    Battle of Trafalgar

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    Song concerning Britain\u27s victory at the Battle of Trafalgar during the Napoleonic Warshttps://egrove.olemiss.edu/kgbsides_uk/1569/thumbnail.jp

    A Tribute: Remembering John Punshon (1935-2017)

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    Excerpt: John Punshon has been one of the premier Quaker historians and spokespersons over the last four decades. With a quick wit and a twinkle in his eye, John inspired thousands with his teaching and ministries in Britain, America, and worldwide. John passed away on March 10th after a second battle with myeloma. He is survived by his wife Veronica, their children—Tom Punshon and Sophie Miller—and their grandchildren, Victoria and James Punshon and Tabitha and Esther Miller

    Who Owned Waterloo? Wellington’s Veterans and the Battle for Relevance

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    This dissertation examines the afterlife of the battle of Waterloo in the collective memory of Great Britain as well as the post-war lives of officers who fought there. Using a variety of techniques associated with cultural, social, and military history, it explores the concept of cultural ownership of a military event and contextualizes the relationship between Britain and her army in the nineteenth century, both at home and abroad. It argues that, almost immediately after the dust settled on the field of Waterloo, a variety of groups laid claim to different aspects of the ownership of the memory of the battle within Great Britain, resulting in a nationalization of the victory that was often complex and marked by overlapping claims. Over the thirty-seven years between the battle in 1815 and the Duke of Wellington’s funeral in 1852, those groups employed histories, memoirs, patronage, tourism, relic collecting, annual commemorations, performances, social interactions, and a variety of art and literature to celebrate Britain’s victory, further craft and delineate their own identities, and incorporate the battle into the wider creation myth of Great Britain. To best explore Britain’s relationship with its army and with the victory at Waterloo, this dissertation is divided into two sections, the first comprising four chapters and the second three. The first section charts the cultural history of the British officer corps and the collective memory of the Battle of Waterloo, allowing for a detailed exploration of the question of ownership of a military victory, both within Britain and internationally. The first chapter contrasts military memoirs with civilian histories. The second examines Waterloo itself as a pilgrimage destination, while widening the question of ownership to include physical items and monuments. The third discusses military and civilian commemorations and celebrations of the Battle of Waterloo, from 1815 until the 1850s. The concluding chapter explores depictions of officers in the popular culture and media of the day. The second section begins with a chapter on the army at home (including Ireland), which discusses the change from wartime to peacetime service. The second chapter examines the involvement of officers in politics, focusing on veterans who followed Wellington’s lead and entered parliament. The third chapter covers veterans appointed by London to positions in the imperial service. The dissertation concludes with an epilogue on Wellington’s state funeral in 1852, arguing that this event served as the culmination of many of the cultural and social trends discussed throughout the work

    The Partnership Between Canada and Britain in Winning the Battle of the Atlantic

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    9. The Second World War (1939-1945)

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    In the first year of war, while Poland succumbed to German armored columns, on the western front the contestants were stalemated. Then, in the spring of 1940, Germany struck through the neutral Netherlands and Belgium and overran France. Norway and Denmark were also captured. Scenting carrion, Mussolini acted the jackal and brought Italy into the war on Germany\u27s side at what he confidently expected was the moment of victory. For a year only Britain held out against the Axis, protected by her island position and the air umbrella provided by the Royal Air Force. Late in 1940, Mussolini invaded Greece, but when he ran into unexpected resistance he had to call on the Germans for help. To accommodate Mussolini, Hitler had to conquer Yugoslavia. Then, frustrated by Britain\u27s resistance, he turned on Russia in the summer of 1941. Back and forth the battle line swayed across the plains of eastern Europe as the two giants slugged it out. [excerpt

    Power to the people: Murdoch Jnr on public service broadcasting

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    The public service broadcasting battle in Britain is about much more than the regulation of TV. It is a fight for the very nature of the news media in the UK and possibly beyond

    A flying Springbok of wartime British skies: A.G. "Sailor" Malan

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    This article, an expanded version of a 2008 public lecture, explores the life and times of Adolph Gysbert ʻSailorʼ Malan, a South African who rose to prominence as a combatant in the 1940 Battle of Britain and who, after his post-war return to the Union, became a notable personality in liberal reform politics. A classic Anglo-Afrikaner empire loyalist or ʻKingʼs Afrikanerʼ, Malan became ʻSailorʼ through his interwar merchant marine service, joining the Royal Air Force in the later 1930s. An exceptional fighter pilot, his wartime role as an RAF ace in defending Britain turned him into a national hero, a migrating loyal Springbok who had sprung selflessly to the defence of Great Britain. Subsequently, as an ex-serviceman, Malan drew on his wartime sensibilities and beliefs to return to political battle in his home country, in opposition to post-1948 Afrikaner nationalism and its apartheid policies. The mini-biography of Sailor Malan analyses several key life-story elements, including his seafaring apprenticeship, British wartime identity and combat experience, and troubled relationship with post- 1945 South Africa as a gradualist liberal
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