15,633 research outputs found

    Myeloid STAT3 promotes formation of colitis-associated colorectal cancer in mice

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    Myeloid cells lacking STAT3 promote antitumor responses of NK and T cells but it is unknown if this crosstalk affects development of autochthonous tumors. We deleted STAT3 in murine myeloid cells (STAT3(Δm)) and examined the effect on the development of autochthonous colorectal cancers (CRCs). Formation of Azoxymethane/Dextransulfate (AOM/DSS)-induced CRCs was strongly suppressed in STAT3(Δm) mice. Gene expression profiling showed strong activation of T cells in the stroma of STAT3(Δm) CRCs. Moreover, STAT3(Δm) host mice were better able to control the growth of transplanted MC38 colorectal tumor cells which are known to be killed in a T cell-dependent manner. These data suggest that myeloid cells lacking STAT3 control formation of CRCs mainly via cross activation of T cells. Interestingly, the few CRCs that formed in STAT3(Δm) mice displayed enhanced stromalization but appeared normal in size indicating that they have acquired ways to escape enhanced tumor surveillance. We found that CRCs in STAT3(Δm) mice consistently activate STAT3 signaling which is implicated in immune evasion and might be a target to prevent tumor relapse

    Pro-inflammatory signaling by IL-10 and IL-22: bad habit stirred up by interferons?

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    Interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-22 are key members of the IL-10 cytokine family that share characteristic properties such as defined structural features, usage of IL-10R2 as one receptor chain, and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 as dominant signaling mode. IL-10, formerly known as cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor, is key to deactivation of monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells. Accordingly, pre-clinical studies document its anti-inflammatory capacity. However, the outcome of clinical trials assessing the therapeutic potential of IL-10 in prototypic inflammatory disorders has been disappointing. In contrast to IL-10, IL-22 acts primarily on non-leukocytic cells, in particular epithelial cells of intestine, skin, liver, and lung. STAT3-driven proliferation, anti-apoptosis, and anti-microbial tissue protection is regarded a principal function of IL-22 at host/environment interfaces. In this hypothesis article, hidden/underappreciated pro-inflammatory characteristics of IL-10 and IL-22 are outlined and related to cellular priming by type I interferon. It is tempting to speculate that an inherent inflammatory potential of IL-10 and IL-22 confines their usage in tissue protective therapy and beyond that determines in some patients efficacy of type I interferon treatment

    Axitinib induces DNA damage response leading to senescence, mitotic catastrophe, and increased NK cell recognition in human renal carcinoma cells.

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    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) including axitinib have been introduced in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) because of their anti-angiogenic properties. However, no evidence are presently available on a direct cytotoxic anti-tumor activity of axitinib in RCC.Herein we reported by western blot analysis that axitinib treatment induces a DNA damage response (DDR) initially characterized by γ-H2AX phosphorylation and Chk1 kinase activation and at later time points by p21 overexpression in A-498 and Caki-2 RCC cells although with a different potency. Analysis by immunocytochemistry for the presence of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in cellular DNA and flow cytometry using the redox-sensitive fluorescent dye DCFDA, demonstrated that DDR response is accompanied by the presence of oxidative DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This response leads to G2/M cell cycle arrest and induces a senescent-like phenotype accompanied by enlargement of cells and increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, which are abrogated by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) pre-treatment. In addition, axitinib-treated cells undergo to cell death through mitotic catastrophe characterized by micronucleation and abnormal microtubule assembly as assessed by fluorescence microscopy.On the other hand, axitinib, through the DDR induction, is also able to increase the surface NKG2D ligand expression. Accordingly, drug treatment promotes NK cell recognition and degranulation in A-498 RCC cells in a ROS-dependent manner.Collectively, our results indicate that both cytotoxic and immunomodulatory effects on RCC cells can contribute to axitinib anti-tumor activity

    Natural killer cell response to chemotherapy-stressed cancer cells: Role in tumor immunosurveillance.

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    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate cytotoxic lymphoid cells that actively prevent neoplastic development, growth, and metastatic dissemination in a process called cancer immunosurveillance. An equilibrium between immune control and tumor growth is maintained as long as cancer cells evade immunosurveillance. Therapies designed to kill cancer cells and to simultaneously sustain host antitumor immunity are an appealing strategy to control tumor growth. Several chemotherapeutic agents, depending on which drugs and doses are used, give rise to DNA damage and cancer cell death by means of apoptosis, immunogenic cell death, or other forms of non-apoptotic death (i.e., mitotic catastrophe, senescence, and autophagy). However, it is becoming increasingly clear that they can trigger additional stress responses. Indeed, relevant immunostimulating effects of different therapeutic programs include also the activation of pathways able to promote their recognition by immune effector cells. Among stress-inducible immunostimulating proteins, changes in the expression levels of NK cell-activating and inhibitory ligands, as well as of death receptors on tumor cells, play a critical role in their detection and elimination by innate immune effectors, including NK cells. Here, we will review recent advances in chemotherapy-mediated cellular stress pathways able to stimulate NK cell effector functions. In particular, we will address how these cytotoxic lymphocytes sense and respond to different types of drug-induced stresses contributing to anticancer activity

    NKG2D and its ligands: one for all, all for one

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    The activating receptor NKG2D is peculiar in its capability to bind to numerous and highly diversified MHC class I-like self-molecules. These ligands are poorly expressed on normal cells but can be induced on damaged, transformed or infected cells, with the final NKG2D ligand expression resulting from multiple levels of regulation. Although redundant molecular mechanisms can converge in the regulation of all NKG2D ligands, different stimuli can induce specific cellular responses, leading to the expression of one or few ligands. A large body of evidence demonstrates that NK cell activation can be triggered by different NKG2D ligands, often expressed on the same cell, suggesting a functional redundancy of these molecules. However, since a number of evasion mechanisms can reduce membrane expression of these molecules both on virus-infected and tumor cells, the co-expression of different ligands and/or the presence of allelic forms of the same ligand guarantee NKG2D activation in various stressful conditions and cell contexts. Noteworthy, NKG2D ligands can differ in their ability to down-modulate NKG2D membrane expression in human NK cells supporting the idea that NKG2D transduces different signals upon binding various ligands. Moreover, whether proteolytically shed and exosome-associated soluble NKG2D ligands share with their membrane-bound counterparts the same ability to induce NKG2D-mediated signaling is still a matter of debate. Here, we will review recent studies on the NKG2D/NKG2D ligand biology to summarize and discuss the redundancy and/or diversity in ligand expression, regulation, and receptor specificity

    Understanding signaling cascades in melanoma

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    Understanding regulatory pathways involved in melanoma development and progression has advanced significantly in recent years. It is now appreciated that melanoma is the result of complex changes in multiple signaling pathways that affect growth control, metabolism, motility and the ability to escape cell death programs. Here we review the major signaling pathways currently known to be deregulated in melanoma with an implication to its development and progression. Among these pathways are Ras, B-Raf, MEK, PTEN, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3Ks) and Akt which are constitutively activated in a significant number of melanoma tumors, in most cases due to genomic change. Other pathways discussed in this review include the [Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT), transforming growth factor-beta pathways which are also activated in melanoma, although the underlying mechanism is not yet clear. As a paradigm for remodeled signaling pathways, melanoma also offers a unique opportunity for targeted drug development.Fil: Lopez Bergami, Pablo Roberto. Sanford-burnham Medical Research Institute; Estados Unidos. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental. Fundación de Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental. Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental; ArgentinaFil: Fitchmann, B. Sanford-burnham Medical Research Institute; Estados UnidosFil: Ronai, Ze´ev. Sanford-burnham Medical Research Institute; Estados Unido

    IMPROVING NK CELL THERAPY FOR OSTEOSARCOMA

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    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary bone tumor. Despite new treatment options, 5-year survival for metastatic OS has remained at only 30% for the last 30 years. Adoptive transfer of Natural Killer (NK) cells holds promise for a new, non-toxic therapy for OS. NK cells are part of the innate immune system and readily kill metastatic and chemotherapy-resistant OS in vitro and in murine models. However, there is little data regarding their efficacy in animal models with an intact immune system. In addition, the OS tumor microenvironment is highly suppressive, producing TGFβ which impedes NK cell killing of solid tumors. We set out to overcome these hurdles by characterizing NK cells in the canine model, which spontaneously develops OS, has a complete tumor microenvironment, an intact immune system, and is an established animal model with proven translatability to human OS. However, little is known about canine NK, preventing the testing of NK cell therapy in canine OS. We also set out to improve NK cell therapy by generating NK cells resistant to TGFβ suppression. To this end, we generated a novel anti-canine NKp46 antibody and characterized canine NK cells as CD3-/NKp46+. Canine NK cells have a median 3-week expansion of 20,000-fold on K562 feeder cells expressing membrane-bound IL-21. Canine NK cells efficiently kill OS, secrete IFNγ and TNFα, and express genes for NK cell receptors. Using a novel non-genetic approach, we generated human NK with reduced sensitivity to TGFβ- Resistant NK (ReNK). ReNK retain high cytolytic activity and produce remarkably more IL-6, IFNγ, and TNFα plus and minus TGFβ treatment compared to Standard NK cells. We characterized the TGFβ pathway in ReNK and found a near complete loss in SMAD3 protein and decreased TGFBR3 expression. ReNK also have enhanced STAT3 activation. In summary, we characterized canine NK cells, establishing the necessary tools to test NK cell therapy in canines to inform the use of NK cells in both human and canine OS. We also generated NK cells with enhanced anti-tumor activity that represent a promising therapeutic option for tumors with high TGFβ production such as OS and brain tumors
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