4,522 research outputs found

    From the Wash to the White Cliffs:The Contribution of the Heritage Sector

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    This report reviews the contribution of heritage to the region defined by the counties of Kent, Essex, Suffolk and Norfolk. It identifies four key themes that link the heritage in the region: coastal defence; Christian heritage; historic houses; and historic landscapes and natural heritage. The region contains one UNESCO World Heritage Site at Canterbury. Heritage is supported by the development of several Heritage Action Zones and High Street Heritage Action Zones across the four counties. Heritage features in the strategies for the two regional Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEP), as well as countywide and local authority heritage and cultural strategies. The report identifies examples of good practice. Several research themes have been identified that link to the interests of the three sponsoring universities of East Anglia, Essex, and Kent. Coastal heritage across the four counties is facing the threat of the climate crisis and assets are being lost due to coastal erosion. The impact of rising sea levels is also assessed. Heritage and cultural property crime affects the sustainability of heritage and cultural property across the region. Five case studies are presented: damage to churches, including lead roof theft; illegal metal-detecting and the disposal of finds; architectural theft; vandalism; and the use of technology to facilitate crime against heritage assets. The third research theme relates to the way that the DCI sector works with heritage organisation to record and interpret assets. The development of a county based Digital Heritage Strategy for Suffolk is highlighted. The economic benefits of heritage are explored through the award of National Lottery Heritage Fund (NLHF) grants to heritage projects. Between 2013 and 2020 the EARC region was awarded over £190 million for heritage projects by NLHF. In addition, the report explores visitor trends and identifies the impact of COVID-19 on the tourism economy for the region. Historic England estimates that the heritage sector accounted for 140,000 jobs in the south east, and eastern England in 2019. The social benefits of heritage align with the UK Government’s Levelling-Up agenda. This is explored through a number of sub-themes: health and well-being; pride in place; digital connectivity; education and skills. The report concludes with a reflection on the challenges facing heritage across the region. This includes encouraging public participation with museums and archives

    Policing the Project: Crime, Carcerality, and Chicago Public Housing

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    This project examines how Chicago\u27s public housing was policed from 1937 to 2000, when the city announced plans to redevelop public housing into privately-owned mixed-income communities under the Plan for Transformation. Drawing upon interviews, historical newspapers, and archival records, it centrally argues that policing contributed to making public housing into a carceral space: one that resembled the prison in design and management and also funneled residents into the criminal-legal system. Writing against popular narratives of public housing as an inherent site of crime and violence, this project instead positions the police—and, by extension, the state—as a central contributor to violence in these spaces. That is, far from mitigating crime, policing often spurred it. Ultimately, the inability of police to effect law and order in public housing provided a justification for its ultimate demolition, resulting in the privatization of subsidized housing and the gentrification of former public housing neighborhoods. Thus, through detailed historical-geographical reconstruction of both everyday practices and extraordinary events, this study shows how policing, through violence enacted upon the housed urban poor, contributes to upholding and reproducing racial capitalist property relations in the contemporary U.S. city

    Victims of Political Violence and Terrorism

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    This book examines the survivors of political violence and terrorism, considering both how they have responded and how they have been responded to following critical incidents. As this work demonstrates, survivors of comparatively rare and spectacular violence hold a mirror up to society’s normative assumptions around trauma, recovery and resilience. Drawing on two years of observational field research with a British NGO who works with victims and former perpetrators of PVT, this book explores contested notions of ‘resilience’ and what it might mean for those negotiating the aftermaths of violence. Examining knowledge about resilience from a multitude of sources, including security policy, media, academic literature and the survivors themselves, this book contends that in order to make empirical sense of resilience we must reckon with both its discursive and practical manifestations. An accessible and compelling read, this book will appeal to students and scholars of criminology, sociology, victimology, criminal justice and all those interested in the stories of survivors

    Programs and Courses Catalog 2022-2023

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    Table of Contents Academic Calendar ... 5General Information ... 7The University and Its Programs ... 7Academic Structure ... 9Admission Requirements ... 16Enrollment and Registration Procedures ... 21Fees and Financial Aid ... 22Student Life ... 28University Facilities and Educational Services ... 33The Fine and Performing Arts at UNI ... 39Academic Regulations ... 44Undergraduate Information and Degree Requirements ... 62Graduate Information, Admission, Academic Regulations, and DegreeRequirements ... 88List of Programs by Department ... 119Department of Accounting ... 125Department of Applied Engineering & Technical Management ... 128School of Applied Human Sciences ... 138Department of Art ... 143Department of Biology ... 149Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry ... 161Department of Communication and Media ... 165Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders ... 179Department of Computer Science ... 182Department of Curriculum and Instruction ... 186Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences ... 199Department of Economics ... 208Department of Educational Psychology, Foundations, andLeadership Studies ... 212Department of Finance ... 219Department of Geography ... 223Department of Health, Recreation and Community Services ... 230Department of History ... 250Interdisciplinary Majors, Minors and Program Certificates ... 256Bachelor of Applied Science Degree Programs ... 257Bachelor of Arts Degree and Minor Programs ... 260Master of Arts Degree Programs ... 268Program Certificates ... 270College of Business ... 275College of Education ... 282College of Social and Behavioral Sciences ... 289Undergraduate Studies ... 292Iowa Lakeside Laboratory ... 293Department of Kinesiology ... 293Department of Languages and Literatures ... 297Department of Management ... 318Department of Marketing and Entrepreneurship ... 322Department of Mathematics ... 329Department of Military Science ... 336School of Music ... 337Department of Philosophy and World Religions ... 352Department of Physics ... 356Department of Political Science ... 361Department of Psychology ... 367Regents Alternative Pathway to Iowa Licensure (RAPIL) -Answering the Call to Teach ... 371Science Education ... 371Social Science ... 376Department of Social Work ... 383Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology ... 388Special Education ... 397Teaching ... 400Department of Theatre ... 400Course Number Explanation ... 404Common Course Numbers ... 405Guide to Course Number Prefixes ... 407Course Descriptions ... 410Accounting Courses (ACCT) ... 411Actuarial Science Courses (ACT SCI) ... 412American Sign Language Courses (ASL) ... 413Anthropology Courses (ANTH) ... 413Art Education Courses (ARTED) ... 415Art History Courses (ARTHIST) ... 416Art Studio Courses (ART) ... 417Athletic Training Courses (AT) ... 419https://scholarworks.uni.edu/uni_catalogs/1065/thumbnail.jp

    Stories of three female social justice leaders : understanding the origins of their leadership.

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    This qualitative investigation of three women’s social justice leadership across the decades from the 1920s to the 2000s, and across Māori and Pākehā worlds, offers rich insights into the origins and orientations of women’s social justice leadership in New Zealand (Aotearoa). My research used the epistemological frameworks of Kāupapa Māori, mana wahine and feminist theory, and a qualitative methodology with a narrative inquiry approach to explore the social justice leadership of two Māori women and one Pākehā woman. Each woman’s story/pūrākau was compiled from archival and other sources, as well as from interviews with whānau (extended family or family group or kin) members. The stories/pūrākau were then analysed thematically with NVivo 12 qualitative research software to explore the origins and orientations of each woman’s social justice leadership. My research was ‘insider’ research as two of the women were my tūpuna (ancestors). Identity was an implicit theme throughout my research due to my positionality as the researcher. The ethical challenges that arose due to this positionality and the methodological decision making throughout my research process were managed with the assistance of a reflexive journal. The women practised leadership across social, historical, cultural and political contexts. The orientations or areas that the women demonstrated leadership in were iwi, hapū, whānau, marae, education for Māori, pacifism and anti-apartheid, the union environment, peace, early childhood education and Parliament. The orientations that these women brought to their social justice leadership was influenced and shaped by their role models, their personal struggles, mana wahine and social norms. It was identified that there was a cost to their leadership. The combined costs to the three women were close family relationships, financial security and personal liberty. Gender, religion and generational contexts influenced the women’s leadership in unique ways. This thesis provides examples of how social justice leadership can be fostered in the future. For example, adolescence was identified as an age when non-familial role models can be particularly effective and how these role models can shape the behaviour of future leaders was evident. The significance and contribution of this thesis is that these women’s stories/pūrākau and the nuanced and complex themes that have emerged from the analysis of these stories/pūrākau offer insights for whānau, policy, practice and future research

    The Rise of Police Unions on the Back of the Black Freedom Movement

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    Police unions have garnered the attention of the media and some scholars in recent years. That attention has often focused on exploring the seemingly inexplicable power of police unions to shield problem officers from accountability as a matter of routine. This paper aims to explain that police union power did not surreptitiously arrive on the doorsteps of American cities. Instead, collective bargaining rights for law enforcement began to gain firm footing during the 1960s when the majority of white Americans were firmly committed to the preservations of their place in the nation’s racial hierarchy as it related to housing, jobs, education and entertainment. Existing legal scholarship has successfully highlighted the depth and breadth of modern-day union contracts and the undemocratic manner by which problematic provisions within those contracts have been negotiated. This article adds to that research by explaining how the social and political interests of both the electors and the elected merged with the demands of officers sworn to protect their specific interests. Law enforcement served as the first line of attack against efforts to free Black communities from police abuses during the 1960s. Police organizations amassed political power during their fight against Black liberation that netted them collective bargaining rights and secured mayoral seats for “law and order” candidates during the 1960s demonstrated America’s deep commitment to unchecked police violence. In short, police unions have effectively accomplished their aim. As such, the solution to the centuries-old problem of police brutality resides with those who have been historically served and relatively unharmed by the violence

    Different Approaches to Economic and Social Changes: New Research Issues, Sources and Results

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    This series was launched in 2021 by the Working Group of Economic and Social History of the Pécs Regional Committee of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences to present research conducted within its framework. The foreign language edition is meant to be a contribution to the internationalization of research made in Hungary. The Working Group has made every effort since the publication of the first two volumes to allow its members, and also their Ph.D. students, to publish their findings more easily and in larger volume, providing at the same time an opportunity for other professionals in the region of South Transdanubia to publish their researches. The majority of the studies in this book, similarly to the first volume of the series, are about the history of the region, but some of the papers go beyond this theme. The diversity of the papers created an inspiring environment for the authors, which in turn has greatly stimulated the already existing professional cooperation among them. Both the editors and the authors find it very important to popularise the economic and social history of the region as broadly as possible, in line with the ambitions of the Pécs Regional Committee of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. In addition, this book also promotes the cooperation among generations of researchers; it is not only the young that enjoy the support of their senior colleagues but the ideas and momentum of the younger generation also keep the activity of the Working Group at a high level. It is due to the well-functioning generational discussions, among other things, that several young researchers earned their Ph.D. degree in 2021. The framework of the studies in the broader sense is the economic and social history of Hungary and Europe in the 18th – 20th centuries. The papers in this volume also provide information about the development and current phases of the different pieces of research. Several papers are sequels to publications released in 2021 from a chronological or thematic aspect, however the book contains brand new topics as well. Great significance is attributed to the fact that several renowned international members of the research network of the Working Group were also persuaded to publish. The results of some ongoing Ph.D. research are also presented. The high number of young authors is a proof that the professional interest in economic and social history is not decreasing at all. We do hope that this book will contribute to the maintenance of this trend.The book was supported by the Regional Committee of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Pécs and the Southern Transdanubia Committee of the Hungarian Historical Societ
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