218,175 research outputs found

    Occupy Movements and the Indignant Figure

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    This issue of the Journal of Peace Review, “Occupy Movements and the Indignant Figure,” springs out of the 2011 peaceful international social movements. Based on collective indignation and organized around 2.0-3.0 strategies, these new social movements exploded in regions across the globe, from North Africa to Spain, from the United States to the Middle East. In this “Occupy” context, our Castellón Spain-based research group, the Interuniversity Institute of Social Development and Peace at UJI (IUDESP), initiated regular research seminars to discuss their relevance and organized in tandem a Summer Course in July 2012

    Between food ethics, solidarity and the social construction of alternative markets. Exploring the dimensions of grassroots food movements in Spain

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    In recent years there has been growing attention for the emergence of alternative food networks, first as a possible strategy for farm households to counter deteriorating market conditions and respond to changing societal demands, and more recently as expression of a growing consumer involvement in the shaping of food systems. In debates on AFNs contributions from Spain have been relatively scarce, not because these tendencies do not occur but rather because applied analytical frameworks somehow did not seem to capture the specific nature of experiences in the peninsula. Against this background, this paper aims to analyze emerging grassroots food movements in Spain, explore to what extent different initiatives constitute a coherent alternative paradigm for sustainable local food systems, and identify relevant dimensions that shape their development and potential contribution to the sustainable development of rural areas and society at large. The paper is mainly based on case studies from Andalucia and the Basque country, and stresses that food initiatives have been largely driven by social movements, incl. peasant‐based farmers and consumer groups but also agroecology movements. As a result, Spanish food movements often have a wider focus and combine ethical values like fairness, solidarity and participative democracy with economic and environmental concerns

    The Existence of Social Movement Organization(SMO) &Comparison of Collective and Connective Action in the Digital Era ---- an Analysis of 15-M Movement in Spain

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    Social movement organizations (SMOs) have been performing a significant role in terms of gathering like-minded civil individuals with common interests during social movements. Stepping into the digital era, the social media becomes prevailing in transforming people’s lifestyles. This essay will discuss the 15-M Movement in Spain to explore the transition of SMO’s position from conventional social movements to those in the digital era in the light of collective action logic and connective action logic. With the phenomenon that SMO itself sometimes is the original source of problems to trigger social movements, it is reasonable to see the decreasingly important SMO with the successful example of the 15-M Movement to engage over 60 cities in Spain and avoid the “free ride” problem via completely excluding brick and mortar organizations

    Social movements in sustainability transitions : identity, social learning & power in the Spanish & Turkish water domains /

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    Descripció del recurs: el 02 de novembre de 2010Dominant economic growth and nation-state building practices are often based on detaching individuals from other individuals and communities from their natural environment in which their livelihoods used to be based. Water plays a key role in these development strategies as it is the case of the building of dams and large water transfer infrastructures. Social-ecological detachment allows on the one hand, to merge former communities into the abstract idea of national citizenship, while at the same time, has a disempowering effect on individuals who try to protect 'their land' and their identity in contrast to the national identity. In this comparative case study, I look at theconflicts and social-ecological detachment processes observed in two communities of Spain and Turkey, and in particular the social movements against the Itoiz Dam in Spain and the Ilısu Dam in the Turkish Kurdistan. These conflicts are representative in the ways water 'policies' become the arena for multiple identities and interests, such as the claims of the stateless nations of the Basques and the Kurds. The anti-Itoiz Dam movement was integrated with the New Water Culture (NWC) movement which emerged as a response to the large scale threat posed by the Spanish National Hydrology Plan (NHP) 2001. Similarly, the anti-Ilısu Dam movement was integrated with the Turkish water movement which emerged as a social justice platform against the threats posed by the 5th World Water Forum (WWF) 2009 which took place in Turkey. On the one hand, through this multi-level alliance formation, these local movements helped to empower their own communities. But on the other hand, they also demonstrated the larger urban public (who, to a great extent, had already been socially and ecologically detached from their traditional lands) that this particular type of development was destructive, resulted in blatant cases of environmental injustice, and that other ways of development less destructive and fairer could be possible. On many grounds, these movements aspire to find ways of reattaching the detached individuals/people back to their communities and nature or, in other words, to reframe the cultural basis of what they see as an unfair growth development paradigm. New community and nature identities have been used to challenge such paradigm and to recreate a more holistic and inclusive social-ecological identity in which human-nature separation becomes increasingly questioned. Empirical data has been gathered from in-depth interviews and focus group meetings held with key actors of these movements, participative-observation, and analysis of secondary sources. Results showed that one clear strategy apparent in both movements was to try to empower people through practices of multi-level networking and collaboration. This enhanced social learning in a way that they learnt not only about the problem they faced, but also on how to build new collective skills to challenge the dominant cultural paradigms which created those unsustainability problems in the first place. Learning, then, in the face of these pro-growth nation-state building strategies, means not only protecting small communities from market forces and global environmental change, but also, in particular, learning to change this dominant cultural paradigm which sees the detachment of people from their communities and from their natural world a necessary condition of progress and development. In this way, new social movements, by aiming to reconstruct such social-ecological identities, may contribute to sustainability learning

    Discourses and practices of radical democracy. The 15M movement as a space of mobilization

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    Social movements are builders of what are known as “grammars of democracy”, that is, val-ues, participatory experiences, political cultures, languages and structures for articulating demands. This article analyses the 15M or indignados (outraged) movement in Spain; a collective action that went be-yond classical protests in response to the economic crisis and proposed changes in democratic practices. Social movements, particularly from the 1990s onwards, have focused on democracy as both a means and an end in order to address what they perceive as authoritarian globalization. The article approaches 15M mainly as a space for mobilization articulating the heterogeneity of the movement as well as its effects in Spain (anti-eviction struggles, PAH, social tides, etc.) with a direct reference to the master frame of 'radical democracy'. Methodologically, this work is based upon interviews, focus groups and participant observa-tion conducted from May 2011 to June 2012 during the occupation of public squares and subsequent mo-bilizations. The text situates this phenomenon in the core of the New Global Movements, and connects it with a decade of similar collective actions in Spain and other parts of the world. Finally, aspects such as the role of the Internet as a tool for and driving force of new models of democracy and the scale of assemblies in relation to deliberative democracy are also discussed

    Social movements and journalism in Spain. A peaceful and transverse proposal

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    Este trabajo analiza los proyectos comunicativos que han surgido a partir de la influencia del movimiento 15-M en España. Como estudio de caso, este artículo analiza el programa informativo “Sí se Puede” del colectivo audiovisual Toma la Tele, que aborda la problemática de la vivienda en España. Para ello, se estudiaron los primeros 5 capítulos que se emitieron entre el 20 de marzo de 2013 y el 17 de abril de 2013, en el marco de la tramitación de la Iniciativa Legislativa Popular presentada (ILP) por la Plataforma de Afectados por la Hipoteca (PAH). El objetivo de este trabajo es conocer las particularidades de estos medios que se han originado a partir del ideario del 15-M, así como profundizar en sus principales líneas discursivas. Tras el análisis del discurso, se observa un énfasis por promover la transversalidad y pacifismo en sus contenidos como también una representación alternativa de las movilizaciones y la figura de la víctima.This paper analyzes the communication projects that have emerged from the 15-M movement in Spain. We will focus on the informative “Sí se puede” which is made by the audiovisual collective Toma la Tele. The principal topic of this program is the housing problem in Spain, and the activities of groups like the Plataforma de Afectados por la Hipoteca (PAH) which are fighting for the right to housing. The corpus is composed for the firsts five episodes, that were issued between March 20, 2013 and April 17, 2013, in the framework of the submission of a Popular Legislative Initiative (ILP), by the Plataforma de Afectados por la Hipoteca. The objective of this study is to determine the specifics of the media that have originated from ideas of the 15-M, as well as deepen their main discursive lines. After discourse analysis, it is concluded that the contents promote a peaceful and transversal discourse. In addition to an alternative representation of the protests and the figure of the victim.Este trabajo se inscribe dentro de las líneas de investigación de los proyectos: CSO2012-34066 “Evaluación e indicadores de sensibilidad moral en la comunicación actual de los movimientos sociales” del Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad de España; P1 1A2012-05 “De víctimas a indignados. Visibilidad mediática, migración de imágenes, espectacularización de los conflictos y procesos de transformación social hacia una cultura de paz”, del Plan de Promoción de la Investigación de la Universitat Jaume I de Castellón; y EuropeAid/131141/C/ACT/Multi “Comunicar en red para el Desarrollo/ Communiquer en réseau pour le développement”, de la Comisión Europea, coordinado por Lafede.cat

    Environmental Justice Movements in Globalizing Networks: A Critical Discussion on Social Resistance against Large Dams

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    We examine the social resistance against large dams as environmental justice movements in four case studies - the Sardar Sarovar Project from India, the Hidrosogamoso from Colombia, the ‘new water culture’ movement in Spain, and the Lesotho Highlands Project from Lesotho - with diverse social, political and environmental contexts. We discuss three broad issues. First, the nature of the involvement of civil society and metropolitan intelligentsia in leadership roles. Second, how cross-class and multi-sectoral alliances have been forged between the local and the global. And third, how the notion of environmental justice in relation to social justice is adopted in these movements

    El nacimiento de un frente estético contra el franquismo: entre la abstracción y la figuración

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    This paper analyzes the appearance of the principal artistic movements that opened an aesthetic, social and political way against francoism in the Spain of the fifties. This meant an alternative to the aesthetic official discourse of the regime in Spain, represented by informalism. The study of the historical development of the former movements intends to show the links that existed between the main antifrancoist artistic activities: geometric abstraction and social realism, which are usually studied and presented separately. This allows a better understanding of the early collaboration of its members to build an aesthetic front against francoism. It is stated here that these initiatives had a richer and more complex sense, which reveals itself when they are analyzed as essential elements in the construction of the cultural frames of the antifrancoist social movements that began their struggle in the Spain of the fifties.En este artículo se analiza la aparición de las principales corrientes artísticas que, a partir de finales de los años cincuenta, hicieron inteligible una vía estética, social y política gracias a la cual tomaba cuerpo una alternativa al discurso estético oficial del franquismo en España, representado por el informalismo. A través del estudio de su desarrollo histórico, se muestran los vínculos existentes entre las principales corrientes plásticas del antifranquismo: la abstracción geométrica y el realismo social, que suelen estudiarse y presentarse por separado. Esto permite entender mejor la colaboración que, muy pronto, se estableció entre sus miembros para constituir un frente estético contra el franquismo. Se sostiene que todas estas propuestas tuvieron un sentido mucho más complejo y rico, éste se hace patente cuando se las analiza como elementos fundamentales en la configuración de los marcos culturales del movimiento social antifraquista que se desarrolló en España a partir de los años cincuenta

    Mediaeval student life

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    Approved by: N.M. TrenholmeTypescriptM.A. University of Missouri 1912To understand the origin and development of the mediaeval universities we must turn to those great social, political and religious movements which characterize that period of European history known as the Twelfth Century Renaissance. At the close of the eleventh and opening of the twelfth centuries we find all Western Europe undergoing a great awakening. Ideas and movements of both local and national importance were spreading throughout the countries of France, Germany, Spain, and Italy. In order that these ideas and movements may find expression new institutions were developed, some of which became important educational agencies.Includes bibliographical reference

    Autonomous and/or institutionalized social movements? Conceptual clarification and illustrative cases

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    Case studies of urban squatting in the United States and the Netherlands, and the fight against sexual violence in Spain and in the Netherlands form the empirical basis of an analysis of the features and development of autonomous and institutionalized social movements, and the in-teraction between them. Autonomous and institutionalized social movements have different strengths that they derive from characteristics that are not compatible. Nevertheless, a dynam-ic is possible that combines the strengths of both models. It provides synergy between self-contained autonomous and institutionalized movements, without imposing trade-offs. Politi-cal opportunity theory suggests that such a ―dual-movement structure‖ is most relevant when the political system is selectively open. Interaction between the movements is conditioned by the mainstreaming potential of the issue or interest that is at stake. Even when relations are tense, movements can create opportunities for each other. Autono-mous movements are able to retain a repertoire of disruptive actions when lobbying is the more popular option. An autonomous movement can benefit from the legitimacy and support-ing network engendered by an institutionalized movement, pioneering work done by an au-tonomous movement can inspire an institutionalized counterpart. Autonomous movements can provide a critical voice when co-optation occurs
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