25,432 research outputs found

    Effect of Marjoram Origanum majorana L. Extract on Growth Performance and Some Haematological Parameters of Common Carp Cyprinus carpio L.

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    The current study examines the effects of different levels of marjoram Origanum majorana extract (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 %) on growth performance and haematological parameters in diets of common carp Cyprinus carpio. Four units of the Recirculating Aquaculture System (RAS) were used. Each unit had three plastic tanks (30×30×60 cm), representing four treatments with three replicates, each tank containing ten fish with an average weight of 16.31 + 0.02g - 16.48 + 0.10.  Fingerlings were fed at a rate of 3% of the total fish weight. All diets contained an average of 33.89 ± 0.067 % crude protein and about 20.32±0.16 (kJ/g) of gross energy. Fish are fed twice daily, six days a week. The study lasted eight weeks (56 days) during November and December 2021. According to our findings, a group of fish fed 1.5% marjoram extract had the highest rate of final body weight, daily weight increase, relative growth rate, specific growth rate, food conversion ratio, and feed conversion efficiency. The 1.5 % marjoram extract treatment had the highest rate of total protein +5.68 0.84 g/dl, albumin +4.48 0.48 g/dl, globulin +1.17 0.54 g/dl and 3.82 + 0.51% albumin/ globulin. Based on the results, it can be concluded that the use of 1.5 % O. majorana extract was best for growth, and blood profile. The results suggest that the inclusion of O. majorana can improve the nutrient efficiency, growth performance, and haematological parameter of C. carpio fingerlings without negative effects on the fish

    Irish Ocean Climate and Ecosystem Status Report

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    Summary report for Irish Ocean Climate & Ecosystem Status Report also published here. This Irish Ocean Climate & Ecosystem Status Summary for Policymakers brings together the latest evidence of ocean change in Irish waters. The report is intended to summarise the current trends in atmospheric patterns, ocean warming, sea level rise, ocean acidification, plankton and fish distributions and abundance, and seabird population trends. The report represents a collaboration between marine researchers within the Marine Institute and others based in Ireland’s higher education institutes and public bodies. It includes authors from Met Éireann, Maynooth University, the University of Galway, the Atlantic Technological University, National Parks and Wildlife, Birdwatch Ireland, Trinity College Dublin, University College Dublin, Inland Fisheries Ireland, The National Water Forum, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Dundalk Institute of Technology.This report is intended to summarise the current trends in Ireland’s ocean climate. Use has been made of archived marine data held by a range of organisations to elucidate some of the key trends observed in phenomena such as atmospheric changes, ocean warming, sea level rise, acidification, plankton and fish distributions and abundance, and seabirds. The report aims to summarise the key findings and recommendations in each of these areas as a guide to climate adaptation policy and for the public. It builds on the previous Ocean Climate & Ecosystem Status Report published in 2010. The report examines the recently published literature in each of the topic areas and combines this in many cases with analysis of new data sets including long-term time series to identify trends in essential ocean variables in Irish waters. In some cases, model projections of the likely future state of the atmosphere and ocean are presented under different climate emission scenarios.Marine Institut

    The muscle nutritional components analysis of golden pompano (Trachinotus blochii) in different mariculture area, growth stages, and genders

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    Golden pompano (Trachinotus blochii) is an economically important fish which exhibits sexual size dimorphism and is widely cultivated in the southern seas of China. To evaluate the nutritional composition of T. blochii of different mariculture areas, growth stages, and genders, the moisture, ash, amino acids, and fatty acids in the muscle were measured using national standard biochemical assay. The analysis found 16 kinds of amino acids in the muscle of T. blochii. The EAA contents of fish from Guangdong (GD) and Guangxi (GX) were significantly lower than those of Hainan (HN) and Fujian (FJ) (p < 0.05). The unsaturated fatty acids were higher in T. blochii cultured in HN and FJ (p < 0.05). Within the same sea area, the contents of TAA, EAA, DAA, and PUFA increased with growth in T. blochii, but the differences were not significant (p > 0.05). EAA/TAA and EAA/NEAA conformed to the ideal FAO/WHO model. The AAS, CS, and EAAI scores of amino acids within groups gradually increased with growth. The TAA, EAA and PUFA contents in females were higher than in males (p > 0.05). The slightly higher amounts of amino acids and fatty acids in female T. blochii indicated females had higher nutritional value. In conclusion, the HN and FJ groups, the later growth stages, and the female T. blochii had generally higher nutritional values than their respective counterparts. These results provide fundamental data supporting all-female T. blochii breeding and culture, and optimized marketing body size

    Comparison between biofloc technology system and aquamimicry in the cultivation of Litopenaeus vannamei in lined ponds in Southern Brazil

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    This work compared biofloc technology and aquamimicry technologies in Litopenaeus vannamei lined ponds, using a density of 60 shrimp·m-2. The experiment lasted 120 days, with two treatments, bioflocs (TBio) and aquamimicry (TMi), and three replications for each. In both treatments, the average values of the water quality parameters were as follows: temperature was 24.0 ± 0.32 °C, dissolved oxygen was 8.00 ± 0.45 mg·L-1, pH was 8.40 ± 0.20, and alkalinity was 240.01 ± 37.15 mg·L-1. The control of water quality was effectively maintained in both treatments, indicating the aquamimicry system’s capability to efficiently recycle the nutrients found in the lined ponds’ water. Furthermore, both treatments demonstrated efficiency in shrimp production, and the shrimp from the TMi treatment reached an average final weight of 11.73 ± 2.21 g, average survival of 53.3 ± 15.2%, and productivity of 3.56 ± 0.15-ton·ha-1. The TBio shrimp reached a final weight of 11.48 ± 1.25 g, survival of 63.3 ± 8.16%, and productivity of 4.08 ± 1.10-ton·ha-1. The present study demonstrated that TMi treatment pondspresented zootechnical performances close to those of TBio treatment ponds. The results achieved can contribute to the improvement of this cultivation system to use it in higher stocking densities

    Gene loss and co-option of toll-like receptors facilitate paternal immunological adaptation in the brood pouch of pregnant male seahorses

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    Male pregnancy in syngnathids (seahorses, pipefishes, and sea dragons) is an evolutionary innovation in the animal kingdom. Paternal immune resistance to the fetus is a critical challenge, particularly in seahorses with fully enclosed brood pouches and sophisticated placentas. In this study, comparative genomic analysis revealed that all syngnathid species lost three vertebrate-conserved Toll-like receptors (TLR1, TLR2, and TLR9), of which all play essential roles in immune protection and immune tolerance in the uterus and placenta. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that the TLR paralog genes including TLR18, TLR25, and TLR21 were highly expressed in the placenta inside the seahorse brood pouch and changed dynamically during the breeding cycle, suggesting the potentially important role of the TLRs during male pregnancy. Furthermore, the immune challenge test in vitro showed a remarkable expression response from all three TLR genes to specific pathogenic antigens, confirming their immune function in seahorse brood pouches. Notably, the altered antigen recognition spectrum of these genes appeared to functionally compensate in part for the lost TLRs, in contrast to that observed in other species. Therefore, we suggest that gene loss and co-option of TLRs may be a typical evolutionary strategy for facilitating paternal immunological adaptation during male pregnancy

    Effects of microplastics, pesticides and nano-materials on fish health, oxidative stress and antioxidant defense mechanism

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    Microplastics and pesticides are emerging contaminants in the marine biota, which cause many harmful effects on aquatic organisms, especially on fish. Fish is a staple and affordable food source, rich in animal protein, along with various vitamins, essential amino acids, and minerals. Exposure of fish to microplastics, pesticides, and various nanoparticles generates ROS and induces oxidative stress, inflammation, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, and DNA damage and alters gut microbiota, thus reducing the growth and quality of fish. Changes in fish behavioral patterns, swimming, and feeding habits were also observed under exposures to the above contaminants. These contaminants also affect the Nrf-2, JNK, ERK, NF-ÎşB, and MAPK signaling pathways. And Nrf2-KEAP1 signalling modulates redox status marinating enzymes in fish. Effects of pesticides, microplastics, and nanoparticles found to modulate many antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione system. So, to protect fish health from stress, the contribution of nano-technology or nano-formulations was researched. A decrease in fish nutritional quality and population significantly impacts on the human diet, influencing traditions and economics worldwide. On the other hand, traces of microplastics and pesticides in the habitat water can enter humans by consuming contaminated fish which may result in serious health hazards. This review summarizes the oxidative stress caused due to microplastics, pesticides and nano-particle contamination or exposure in fish habitat water and their impact on human health. As a rescue mechanism, the use of nano-technology in the management of fish health and disease was discussed

    THE BLUE ECONOMY CONTRIBUTES TO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

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    Wealth of natural resources needs to be utilized optimally because it can support economic growth, welfare, livelihoods to sustainable development. Efforts to utilize this can be implemented including the blue economy. This study aims to determine the implementation of the blue economy to contribute to sustainable development. This study used a qualitative research method with a descriptive approach, while the data collection technique was carried out by means of a literature study through exploration of journals, books, and other information relevant to the study studies obtained through the official websites of Google Scholar and Scopus with Quartile 1 to 2 qualifications. Research results shows that the Blue Economy reduces the number of unemployed. In addition, the Blue Economy has the power to get better marine ecosystem governance, lower emissions, fairer health standards and become a player in fighting climate change where all of these things can support the creation of sustainable development.   Keywords: Blue Economy, Contribution, Sustainable Development &nbsp

    Levendelagret rødspette (Pleuronectes platessa) – velferd og kvalitet

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    I dag er verdikjeden for fisk og skalldyr bygget opp rundt utnyttelse av et fåtall arter som kan fanges i store volum og med høy markedsverdi. Bruk av lite eller ikke utnyttede marine ressurser kan være en bærekraftig tilnærming for å innfri fremtidige krav og etterspørsel til fiskekonsum. Rødspette (Pleuronectes platessa) er den viktigste flatfisken i volum og verdi i europeiske fiskerier. Både fangst og prosessering av rødspette er begrenset i Norge, og det samme med lønnsomheten. Snurrevad anses som å være det mest skånsomme redskapet for å holde fangsten levende. Levendelagring av rødspette kan være et alternativ for å oppnå et lønnsomt fiskeri. Større mengder rødspette kan da lagres i merd, og slaktes ved behov for å sikre stabile leveranser til markedet. Rødspette ble fanget kommersielt med snurrevad med lav åpning, utenfor Henningsvær i september 2022. Fisken ble transportert levende ved tetthet 250 kg/m2 og 500 kg/m2. Etter to dager ble fisken overført til merd for levendelagring. Prøvetaking ble tatt rett etter fangst og etter 3, 18 og 26 dager levendelagring. Fangstskader ble registrert, og utviklingen av skadene ble fulgt gjennom levendelagringen. Velferd ble vurdert under levendelagringen. Etter avliving ble fisken lagret på is i 6, 10(9) og 13 dager før sensorisk vurdering av hel fisk og deretter filetering og sensorisk vurdering av filetene. Filetprøver ble benyttet til å analysere sammensetning av vann, aske, protein og frie aminosyrer. Under levendelagring, ble fangstskader som bloduttredelser mindre fremtredende, mens redskapsmerker ble mer synlige. Skader på finner og katarakt økte, med lengre levendelagring. Konsistens på filet ble bløtere med økende levendelagringstid og økende islagringstid. Vanninnholdet økte signifikant under levendelagringen. Innholdet av de frie aminosyrene taurin, histidin, threonin, prolin og lysin sank under levendelagringen

    Effect of fermented sarco oyster extract on age induced sarcopenia muscle repair by modulating regulatory T cells

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    Sarcopenia is an age-related, progressive skeletal muscle disorder involving the loss of muscle mass and strength. Previous studies have shown that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from fermented oysters aids in regulatory T cells (Tregs) cell expansion and function by enhancing autophagy, and concomitantly mediate muscle regeneration by modulating muscle inflammation and satellite cell function. The fermentation process of oysters not only increases the GABA content but also enhances the content of branched amino acids and free amino acids that aid the level of protein absorption and muscle strength, mass, and repair. In this study, the effect of GABA-enriched fermented sarco oyster extract (FSO) on reduced muscle mass and functions via Treg modulation and enhanced autophagy in aged mice was investigated. Results showed that FSO enhanced the expression of autophagy markers (autophagy-related gene 5 [ATG5] and GABA receptor-associated protein [GABARAP]), forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) expression, and levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-10 and transforming growth factor [TGF]-β) secreted by Tregs while reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (IL-17A and interferon [IFN]-γ). Furthermore, FSO increased the expression of IL-33 and its receptor IL-1 receptor-like 1 (ST2); well-known signaling pathways that increase amphiregulin (Areg) secretion and expression of myogenesis markers (myogenic factor 5, myoblast determination protein 1, and myogenin). Muscle mass and function were also enhanced via FSO. Overall, the current study suggests that FSO increased autophagy, which enhanced Treg accumulation and function, decreased muscle inflammation, and increased satellite cell function for muscle regeneration and therefore could decrease the loss of muscle mass and function with aging

    Tasting the ocean: How to increase ocean literacy using seafood heritage with a visceral approach

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    This contribution explores the growing interest in ocean literacy and sustainable seafood consumption through the lens of transdisciplinary and visceral research methods. It illustrates a series of experimental, marine-focused workshops, carried out during the Covid-19 pandemic for Irish students aged between 15 and 18. The empirical body builds on a series of questionnaires completed prior, during and at the end of the workshops as well as direct observations of feedbacks and interactions. By offering to the students creative and playful methods which included cooking classes, coastal explorations and information about their coastal cultural heritage, we argue that transdisciplinary and visceral methods can facilitate how ocean literacy and sustainable eating is understood and operationalised—in both educational programmes and policy frameworks
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