9 research outputs found

    La Città Altra:Storia e immagine della diversità urbana: luoghi e paesaggi dei privilegi e del benessere, dell’isolamento, del disagio, della multiculturalità

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    This volume proposes a rich corpus of papers about the ‘Other City’, a subject only few times dealt with, but worthy of all our attention: it imposes itself on the scene of international modern and contemporary historiography for its undeniable topicality. Throughout history, the city has always had to deal with social ‘otherness’, i.e. with class privileges and, consequently, with discrimination and marginalization of minorities, of the less well-off, of foreigners, in short, with the differences in status, culture, religion. So that the urban fabric has ended up structuring itself also in function of those inequalities, as well as of the strategic places for the exercise of power, of the political, military or social control, of the spaces for imprisonment, for the sanitary isolation or for the ‘temporary’ remedy to the catastrophes. From the first portraits of cities, made and diffused at the beginning of the fifteenth century for political exaltation purposes or for religious propaganda and for devotional purposes, which often, through increasingly refined graphic techniques, distort or even deny the true urban image, we reach, at the dawn of contemporary history, the new meaning given by scientific topography and new methods of representation; these latter aimed at revealing the structure and the urban landscape in their objectivity, often unexpected for who had known the city through the filter of ‘regime’ iconography. The representation of the urban image still shows the contradictions of a community that sometimes includes and even exalts the diversities, other times rejects them, showing the unease of a difficult integration

    La Città Altra: Storia e immagine della diversità urbana: luoghi e paesaggi dei privilegi e del benessere, dell’isolamento, del disagio, della multiculturalità

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    [English]: This volume proposes a rich corpus of papers about the ‘Other City’, a subject only few times dealt with, but worthy of all our attention: it imposes itself on the scene of international modern and contemporary historiography for its undeniable topicality. Throughout history, the city has always had to deal with social ‘otherness’, i.e. with class privileges and, consequently, with discrimination and marginalization of minorities, of the less well-off, of foreigners, in short, with the differences in status, culture, religion. So that the urban fabric has ended up structuring itself also in function of those inequalities, as well as of the strategic places for the exercise of power, of the political, military or social control, of the spaces for imprisonment, for the sanitary isolation or for the ‘temporary’ remedy to the catastrophes. From the first portraits of cities, made and diffused at the beginning of the fifteenth century for political exaltation purposes or for religious propaganda and for devotional purposes, which often, through increasingly refined graphic techniques, distort or even deny the true urban image, we reach, at the dawn of contemporary history, the new meaning given by scientific topography and new methods of representation; these latter aimed at revealing the structure and the urban landscape in their objectivity, often unexpected for who had known the city through the filter of ‘regime’ iconography. The representation of the urban image still shows the contradictions of a community that sometimes includes and even exalts the diversities, other times rejects them, showing the unease of a difficult integration / [Italiano]: Questo volume propone un ricco corpus di contributi sulla ‘CittĂ  Altra’, un tema sinora poco battuto ma degno di tutta la nostra attenzione, che s’impone sulla scena della storiografia internazionale, moderna e contemporanea, per la sua innegabile attualitĂ . Nel corso della storia, la cittĂ  ha dovuto sempre fare i conti con le ‘alterità’ sociali, ossia con i privilegi di classe e, conseguentemente, con la discriminazione e l’emarginazione delle minoranze, dei meno abbienti, degli stranieri, insomma con le diversitĂ  di status, di cultura, di religione. SicchĂ© il tessuto urbano ha finito per strutturarsi anche in funzione di quelle diseguaglianze, oltre che dei luoghi strategici per l’esercizio del potere, del controllo politico, militare o sociale, degli spazi per la reclusione, per l’isolamento sanitario o per il rimedio ‘temporaneo’ alle catastrofi. Dai primi ritratti di cittĂ  elaborati e diffusi sul principio del Quattrocento per fini di esaltazione politica o per la propaganda religiosa e per scopi devozionali, che spesso, attraverso tecniche grafiche sempre piĂč raffinate, falsano o addirittura negano la vera immagine urbana, si giunge, all’alba della storia contemporanea, al nuovo significato dato dalla topografia scientifica e dai nuovi metodi di rappresentazione, atti a svelare la struttura e il paesaggio urbano nella loro oggettivitĂ , spesso cruda e inaspettata per quanti, prima di allora, avessero conosciuto la cittĂ  attraverso il filtro dell’iconografia ‘di regime’. La rappresentazione dell’immagine urbana mostra ancora oggi le contraddizioni di una comunitĂ  che a volte include, e persino esalta, le diversitĂ , altre volte le respinge, tradendo il malessere di una difficile integrazione

    Fit to mother: women, architecture, and the performance of health, 1865-1930

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    In the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, evolving scientific ideas about the body and its vulnerabilities, about women’s education, and about appropriate gendered behavior each contributed to the emergence of physical culture and healthy living environments for women and girls. Decrying the physical state of American mothers, health reformers and educators promoted new habits and routines meant to establish bodily health, and ushered physical culture programs into educational institutions and private homes. Bound together by their unwavering faith in the ability of the material world to produce healthy bodies, reformers evoked the language of efficiency, of maternal fitness, and of a fallible body that could be bolstered through material objects and spaces. This dissertation provides at once a cultural history of the female body, a study of architecture and material culture, and a critical examination of the ways in which race has been historically constructed. While scholars have begun to take up the diverse threads of this story, an architectural and material analysis of spaces and objects for exercise has thus far been overlooked. Drawing on prescriptive literature, building manuals, advertisements, and images, this dissertation argues that in the decades between 1865 and 1930, scientific ideas about racial reproduction tangibly effected the design of women’s spaces. Chapter One locates the roots of women’s physical culture in the aftermath of the Civil War and elucidates its relationship to the dress reform movement. Chapter Two considers architectural space for women’s exercise from 1881 to 1912. These three decades mark a crucial moment as the typology of the American gymnasium solidified, and women’s physical culture slowly moved out-of-doors. Chapter Three examines the middle-class house through the lens of health, and the ways in which reformers and medical experts projected scientific beliefs about gendered and racialized fitness onto the home, its contents, and the moments of performance required to maintain household and personal health. It concludes with a discussion of performative health in each of these three instances, and the specialized knowledge required of women to maintain their own health and the health of their households

    Canada's Residential Schools: The History, Part 1 Origins to 1939

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    The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Volume 1

    Resilient places? The healthcare gardens and the Maggie's Centres

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    This thesis takes as its focus the Maggie’s Cancer Centres exploring for the first time the impact of their designed gardens. This research is situated within the immediate context of Maggie’s ambitions as an organisation and looks closely at their design process. It is also set within the wider debates about the effects of green space on health and the historical context of the restorative garden. By exploring both historical and contemporary examples, it argues that a healthcare garden may be a space for transformation. Using four different Maggie’s gardens as case studies, the research seeks to investigate the role of these outdoor spaces and their impact on users. Through ethnographic and sensory methods, each garden is considered and mapped. It looks at the design brief and the intentions of the designers’, but the core work is an exploration of the experiences of staff and visitors. The focus is on the everyday use of these gardens as well as the design historiography. The experiences of gardens within healthcare are examined in order to expose the ways in which gardens, people, health and care are entwined. Through the qualitative research process this thesis develops a new hypothesis as to how healthcare gardens may operate – offering a new definition for them as “resilient places”. Careful analysis of the data reveals the specific networks and affordances presented by these gardens. The thesis argues, based on the evidence of users, that healthcare gardens can uniquely embrace certain “essences” where essence is defined as conveying a quality or attribute. These garden essences are identified as thresholds, sensory richness, the density of time and homeliness. The thesis also argues that a healthcare garden can provide specific and unique opportunities for care and this, in turn, can enhance the healing ethos of an organisation such as Maggie’s

    Piercing Poverty with Light, Air and Control 1887-1906: A Case for the Preservation of Eight New York City Small Parks

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    From 1887 to 1906, rising in the place of what were once blocks of squalor, poverty and slum tenements, eight small parks thrilled the children their respective New York City neighborhoods. Created under the Small Parks Act of 1887, these parks were intended to bring better health, light and air to neighborhoods where the city’s poorest lived. Four of the parks (Mulberry Bend, Hudson, Hamilton Fish and William H. Seward Parks), were clustered below 14th Street, where many of the city’s newest and poorest immigrants settled in the mid to late 1800’s, but the other four (East River, John Jay, DeWitt Clinton and St. Gabriel’s Parks) were located next to the East and North (Hudson) Rivers, along Manhattan’s perimeters, where the island’s pollution was at its worst, rents were at their lowest, and the populations of the poor at their highest, after the area below 14th Street. Each of these parks, and the neighborhoods surrounding them, has a unique origin and history. Well-known landscape architects, architects and engineers designed their landscapes, pavilions, bathhouses and gymnasiums plans. Designs of these parks fell into one of three landscape ideals: Picturesque, Beaux Arts or the emerging Playground-Recreational design. As a group, they are an important representation of the national Small Parks Movement, as New York City was one of the first major cities to create small parks. They are especially important because of the notoriety of their designers. Eventually, all of these parks would become first, playground parks, and then, recreational parks, each retaining some element of their original design. All eight of these parks are still beloved and well used parks in Manhattan. This thesis documents the histories and designs of these parks, as well as any significant subsequent changes to the parks; it documents elements in the parks worthy of preservation, including any extant structures, landscape plans or fencing, or foliage

    Central Europe – Modernism and the modern movement as viewed through the lens of town planning and building 1895 - 1939

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    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University.This thesis sets out to re-locate and redefine the historical arguments around the development of the Modern Movement in architecture. It investigates the development of architectural modernism in Central Europe from 1895-1939 in the towns and cities of the multinational Habsburg Empire, in a creative milieu in which opposition, contrast and difference were the norm. It argues that the evolution of the Modern Movement through the independent nations that arose from the Empire constituted an early and significant engagement with urbanisation, planning and architectural modernism that has been largely overlooked by western scholarship. By reviewing the extant literature in discussion with Central European authorities and by drawing upon a little known range of sources, this thesis brings into focus the role of key individuals such as Plečnik, Fabiani and Kotěra and it explores the significance of developments in town planning in places like Zagreb and Ljubljana. In restoring some of this missing detail and revisiting some of the key sites, the thesis reveals how Central European individuals made early and significant contributions to the development of architectural modernism and the Modern Movement that have hitherto received little critical acknowledgement. What this research reveals is how these figures developed what can be seen as local solutions, rooted in the context and culture of individual towns and cities and their unique histories. However more significantly, this thesis also demonstrates that these independent initiatives were formed with an understanding of - and in response to - wider national and international developments in the field of architectural modernism. In this connection, the thesis can be regarded as part of an emerging academic effort to redress the history of the Modern Movement and an attempt to set in motion a raft of suggestion for further research into this rich field of cultural endeavour

    Our Appalachia: An Oral History

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    Many books have been written about Appalachia, but few have voiced its concerns with the warmth and directness of this one. From hundreds of interviews gathered by the Appalachian Oral History Project, editors Laurel Shackelford and Bill Weinberg have woven a rich verbal tapestry that portrays the people and the region in all their variety. The words on the page have the ring of truth, for these are the people of Appalachia speaking for themselves. Here they recollect an earlier time of isolation but of independence and neighborliness. For a nearer time they tell of the great changes that took place in Appalachia with the growth of coal mining and railroads and the disruption of old ways. Persisting through the years and sounding clearly in the interviews are the dignity of the Appalachian people and their close ties with the land, despite the exploitation and change they have endured. When first published, Our Appalachia was widely praised. This new edition again makes available an authentic source of social history for all those with an interest in the region. The whole history, past and present, of Appalachia is in this book in the words of the people most fit to tell it. The editors have done a superb job of arranging and commenting on the interviews—juxtaposing contrary opinions about issues as varied as strip-mining, traditional way and modern life, tourism and local politics, and the future of the whole region. —New York Times Book Review Our Appalachia is obviously a treasure to be savored as much as read. My hope for it is that it will go beyond receiving more than a few moments of recognition and become a force that will rouse the kind of attention that Appalachians deserve all the time. —Washington Post Book World The genius of this book, in fact, may be that it shows that there is no \u27typical Appalachian.\u27 The people of the mountains are as varied as people of any other region, and if they have a common attribute it is their love of their prickly, lovely land and a certain humor developed in dealing with it. —Louisville Courier-Journal Our Appalachia gives us a beautiful songbook, songs preserving the memories, thoughts, and experiences of people who would otherwise have remained as anonymous as the black seams of coal they dug for so very long. —Chicago Tribune Book World A compilation of the Appalachian Oral History Project, this is the summa of a five-year collaboration between the community and the staff members and students of four regional colleges. It is a book which self-consciously seeks to inspire pride in those who continue to live in the region long proclaimed one of the most benighted in America. The stoicism, courage, and flinty humor of the mountaineers is recorded for their grandchildren in the tales of wild man \u27Devil John\u27; homemade whiskey, quilting, and cornshucking; the early horrors of the coal mines and the battles of the UMW. But the book suffers from a kind of forced optimism--\u27the spirit of independence is alive and well in Central Appalachia\u27--which is not borne out by the words of men like Lewis Burke who says simply, \u27Mining is really a hazardous job with no future.\u27 Economic self-sufficiency has always been an elusive goal, and people seem uncomfortably aware that control of the resources and wealth of eastern Kentucky is in the hands of outsiders. There are some who speak in favor of responsible strip mining and turning Appalachia into a \u27recreational playground\u27; others bitterly oppose such notions and talk of a fundamentalist land ethic, diagnosing the malaise as \u27spiritual\u27 rather than social or economic; still others have concluded that \u27It\u27s proven out to be dog eat dog.\u27 The whole is bound together only by dogged hope, not the kind of trenchant analysis and unifying vision that can make oral history a uniquely powerful document. —Kirkus Reviewshttps://uknowledge.uky.edu/upk_appalachian_studies/1016/thumbnail.jp

    SPACE FOR THE BOUNDARY – BOUNDARY AS PLACE: Architectural boundary as a relational concept in urban mass housing

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    This theory-based research challenges a perceived paradox between the propositions of self-sufficiency and of self-containment in mass housing in London. It focuses on institutional and physical boundaries between private and public space that posit each as separate from the other, in statutory and legal frameworks specific to the UK, and in architectural formulas for high density housing. It challenges conceptions about public/private relationships that support hermeticity: protection of privacy and of propriety, from neighbours, from damage and from climate change. In the construction industries, sustainability is also increasingly assigned to the building's 'performance' rather than to its users' concomitant participation in that performance during the building's lifetime. Through primary source material evidence found in the urban fabric, the research explores privacy/publicity dynamics in architecture and asks whether a reassertion of residential boundaries could provide future paradigms for the collective project of urban sustainability. These possibilities are scrutinised through the lens of architectural boundaries in selected case studies of high density housing in London, to identify contradictions certain designs generate with regards to sustainability, and to initiate a debate about their implications and relevance to long-term evolution towards a more ecologically resilient urban future
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