102 research outputs found

    L’archeologia del graphic novel

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    The archaeology of the graphic novel does not shed light on the historical origins of the comic book; on the contrary, it tries to discover the conceptual genesis of this narrative form. If the research methodology is archaeological, in fact, the theoretical approach is the same as neuro-narratology, in the light of which four important stages are suggested. These stages define the comic novel as a "natural" literary genre, a mimesis of the process transposing reality into images and constituting the basis of thought. The figure of Rodolphe Töpffer is not excluded from this process. Thanks to his theories and his work, he leads us to hypothesize that the comic book was more "novelistic" at its origin than it is in its current forms: the path to the novel, then, would not be so much of an evolution, but rather a return to the origins

    "'This wide gap of time since first / We were dissevered.' Alchemy, Time, Water, and Royalty in The Winter's Tale"

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    noneThe aim of this study is to offer a reading of one of William Shakespeare’s last plays, The Winter’s Tale, in the light of alchemical and Hermetic imagery and language. Moving from the theoretical apparatus of the history of ideas, first theorised by Arthur Lovejoy, this dissertation provides a new perspective from which to interpret a play much debated as The Winter’s Tale. The dissemination of Hermetic and alchemical ideas reached a climax in both England and the rest of Europe precisely in-between the sixteenth and the seventeenth centuries: a number of editions and translations of alchemical treatises were amply circulating either singularly or in wide collections. Among the most renowned writings of the time, well known to Shakespeare and his audience, were the works of the Swiss alchemist and physician Paracelsus. Interestingly enough, Shakespeare’s son-in-law, the physician John Hall, employed Paracelsian remedies, as attested by his medical diary. As a matter of fact, the controversy between Galenists and Paracelsians is explicitly evoked in one of Shakespeare’s comedies: All’s Well That Ends Well. In England, under the reigns of Queen Elizabeth and King James, alchemy was a highly controversial subject: even though it offered poets, dramatists, and artists a rich set of allegorical images and symbols with which to praise the monarchs and their court, it was also perceived as a dangerous and fraudulent activity. Elizabeth, defined as the “vndeluding alchemist” by William Warner and as an “Alchymist diuine” by John Davies, was praised as both a patron and a symbol of the alchemical art, even though her attitude towards alchemy was not always straightforward: the queen, who devoted herself to alchemical practices with John Dee, usually employed intermediary figures, such as William Cecil and Francis Walsingham, when dealing with alchemists who sought for royal patronage. Unlike Queen Elizabeth, King James is usually considered as totally hostile to the world of Renaissance Hermeticism. However, significant evidence exists that testifies to James’s refusal of black magic and witchcraft and attests, instead, that he liked to be identified with Hermes Trismegistus and Solomon, the ‘fathers’ of alchemy. Francis Bacon himself, in the Epistle Dedicatory of The Advancement of Learning (1605), defines the Stuart monarch as “invested of that triplicity which in great veneration was ascribed to the ancient Hermes”. The Winter’s Tale, almost contemporary with Ben Jonson’s The Alchemist and performed by the same theatre company, the King’s Men, questions several of the issues that were at the core of Renaissance Hermetic culture. The most evident reference to Hermeticism that is to be found in Shakespeare’s romance is provided by the statue scene: by putting on stage a sculptural work of art that seemingly comes to life, Shakespeare alludes to the Egyptian magic and art that is recounted in the Hermetic treatise Asclepius. This dissertation, however, also investigates several aspects of the play that have never been read in this light before. The protagonist of the romance, King Leontes, is submitted to a process of symbolical death and rebirth, a pattern that recalls the cycle of the 'opus alchymicum' and all those alchemical parables that dwell upon the allegory of the transmutation of the so-called 'rex chymicus', emblem of philosophical gold. In the healing, and obliquely alchemical, journey of the drama, Paulina plays a central role: the woman, who employs her magical art to restore life and ‘mend’ nature, functions as a personification of the alchemical art. Furthermore, time and water are essential in the redemptive and circular path of the play: as in alchemical imagery, they are conceived of as both destroying and healing, contributing to ‘re-create’ the diseased microcosm of Leontes and the macrocosm of nature.Dottorato di ricerca in Studi linguistici e letterarinoneZamparo, Martin

    Modern Spiritualism: Its Quest to Become A Science

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    Brassroots Democracy and the Birth of Jazz: Hearing the Counter-Plantation in Black Atlantic Sonic Culture, 1791-1928

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    This dissertation is both a comparative cultural history and a social history of early New Orleans jazz. While twentieth-century paradigms tend to examine jazz as a product of a self-contained African American culture or of African-European interaction, I argue that we would be better served understanding jazz’s syncretism within the Afro-Atlantic social movements which contested slavery, colonization, and capitalism in the Caribbean basin. From the Haitian revolution to Radical Reconstruction, new musical forms were an important tool to communicate political developments abroad as well as to generate an aestheticized political consciousness that imagined, built, and martialed the collective will to defend a new commons. Part one explores intra-Caribbean influences on the music and political organizing of Louisiana’s Black communities, particularly highlighting the impact of the Haitian Revolution. I explore the life of bandleader and freedom-rider Daniel Desdunes, and his influential sister, the Stroyville blues pioneer Mamie Desdunes, arguing that their Haitian identities and connection to counter-plantation legacies influenced the development of their practice of jazz as activism. I also trace the family of clarinetists Lorenzo and Louis Tio whose connections to revolutionary Mexico allowed them safe passage to build an agricultural commune in the mid-19th century to escape the racial oppression of antebellum New Orleans. Part two explores the prominence of brass bands within Black American social movements in the south, including during the Civil War, at dockworkers’ union parades in New Orleans, and on plantations themselves. Tracing the bands’ institutional history opens up new connections between the collectivist structures heard in early jazz and the practice of grassroots democracy and communal economics among African Americans in both rural and urban Louisiana. In tune with the counter-plantation, these forms of social organization were recreated and resurrected in the music, performing the world they struggled to see

    'Mechanic' to the book trade: Joseph Whitaker and information services in the Victorian book trade

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    Joseph Whitaker is best remembered today as the originator of Whitaker’s Almanack but he should also be recognised as one of the most important publishers of the mid- and late- Victorian period and the creator of an information system that transformed the book trade into a modern industry. As editor of a trade journal and catalogue aimed at supporting the bookselling trade, respectively The Bookseller and The Reference Catalogue of Current Literature, he had a panoramic view of trade activities and of the commercial and structural forces that governed them. By gathering, organising and disseminating information he considered most valuable for these traders and encouraging them to participate in discussions and debates about the issues that affected their livelihoods, Whitaker helped booksellers grasp the opportunities of the growing demand for books and mitigate the risks to their businesses. A close and systematic examination of The Bookseller and The Reference Catalogue offers new perspectives on the operations of the Victorian book trade and insights into the practices and experiences of ordinary booksellers whose voices are usually silent in the historical record. Using historical analysis and conceptualising the book trade as a supply chain of competing traders rather than a coherent community, the thesis argues that Whitaker’s publications were more than just sources of information. They were the key elements in an information service devised initially to support booksellers but that became the foundations of a communication system for the whole book trade that remain at the heart of the contemporary publishing industry to this day

    Critical Alliances

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    Critical Alliances argues that late-Victorian and modernist feminist authors saw in literary representations of female collaboration an opportunity to produce new gender and economic roles for women. It is not often that one thinks of female allegiances – such as kinship networks, cultural inheritance, or lesbian marriage – as influencing the marketplace; nor does one often think of economic models when theorizing feminist cooperation. S. Brooke Cameron suggest that, through their representations of female partnership, feminist authors such as Virginia Woolf, Olive Schreiner, George Egerton, Amy Levy, and Michael Field redefined the gendered marketplace and, with it, women’s professional opportunities. Interdisciplinary at its core and using a contextual approach, Critical Alliances selects cultural texts and theories relevant to each writer’s particular intervention in the marketplace. Chapters look at how different forms of feminist collaboration enabled women to stake their claim to one of the many, emergent professions at the turn of the century

    Florida Historical Quarterly, Vol. 27, Issue 4

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    Major-General John Campbell in British West Florida George C. Osborn Nocoroco, a Timucua Village of 1605 John W. Griffin Hale G. Smith The Founder of the Seminole Nation Kenneth W. Porter A Connecticut Yankee after Olustee Letters from the front Vaughn D. Bornet Book reviews: Kathryn Abbey Hanna: “Florida Land of Change” Paul Murray: “The Whig Party in Georgia, 1825-1853” Herbert J. Doherty Jr. Local History: “The Story of Fort Myers” Pensacola Traditions The Early Southwest Coast Early Orlando “They All Call it Tropical” The Florida Historical Society A noteworthy gift to our library List of members Contributors to this numbe
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