1,399 research outputs found

    Over the Range

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    Francaviglia looks anew at the geographical-historical context of the driving of the golden spike in May 1869. He gazes outward from the site of the transcontinental railroad\u27s completion—the summit of a remote mountain range that extends south into the Great Salt Lake. The transportation corridor that for the first time linked America\u27s coasts gave this distinctive region significance, but it anchored two centuries of human activity linked to the area\u27s landscape. Francaviglia brings to that larger story a geographer\u27s perspective on place and society, a railroad enthusiast\u27s knowledge of trains, a cartographic historian\u27s understanding of the knowledge and experience embedded in maps, and a desert lover\u27s appreciation of the striking basin-and-range landscape that borders the Great Salt Lake.https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/usupress_pubs/1114/thumbnail.jp

    Issue No. 19: August 1984

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    1 Jack Boyer Receives Board of Directors Award1 Jack Boyer: The Man behind the Kit Carson Foundation1 Historical Society Presents Awards1 Los Alamos Historical Museum August Event1 Aztec Museum Association Wants to Know1 New Mexico and Its Railroads: A Special Issue of La Crónica2 New Mexico and Its Railroads2 Santa Fe and the Santa Fe Railroad3 Preservation and New Mexico3 Historic Railroad Depots4 The Tunnels at Guadalupe Box4 The Railroad Building Inventory: A Report from the Field4 Trains to Ride in New Mexico4 Locomotives on Display5 Chama: A Reminder of the Railroad Age6 Santa Fe Railway Locomotive Collection7 Thank You, Kit Carson Foundation7 Directory of Historians and Historical Organizations Issued7 Book Review, Mercedes Reales: Hispanic Land Grants of the Upper Rio Grande Region8 Museum of New Mexico Archaeologist and Volunteers Excavate Downtown Santa Fe Historical Site8 Walking Tour of Farmington Published8 First National Conference for Genealogists in Rocky Mountains8 New Appointments at Museum of New Mexic

    The saga of the 708 Railway Grand Division

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    Beginning of Chapter 7, Conclusion: In this book, the author has not attempted to give a complete history of the Military Railway Service. And in a sense, the task of the author has been a painful one. Limitations of space have precluded the inclusion of many episodes, vignettes, descriptions and analyses. Consequently, most of the personnel concerned have had to remain anonymous. War is not only a matter of facts and statistics. It is experience, and no others can quite understand that experience. The author has tried to tell the story of the war as it came to our organization how it looked and felt, and what our activities were during the fighting. The splendid performance of the 708th reflected credit on all of our personnel rather than on any individual or small group of individuals. This book is intended primarily for personnel of our immediate headquarters, and I trust they will understand and forgive me for not including their individual chapters.https://digicom.bpl.lib.me.us/ww_reg_his/1098/thumbnail.jp

    The Diesel-Electric Locomotive as a Work Environment: A Study in Applied Anthropology

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    Paper by Frederick C. Gams

    Tracks in the Woods: Identifying and Evaluating Historic Logging Railroad Systems within the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest

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    The Sauk River Lumber Company (SRLC) operated in western Washington\u27s Sauk River valley between 1922 and 1954. Impacts made on the landscape during that time can still be identified. Archival research, oral history interviews and archaeological fieldwork were undertaken to identify and evaluate the many landscape features associated with the SRLC\u27s timber harvest activities. The systematic identification and documentation of this single company\u27s logging operations and the features that resulted from those operations can be used to assist cultural resource managers facing the same task elsewhere. Maps, diagrams, and photographs are included to provide resource managers with basic tools and methods for the identification of railroad logging features, their probable locations, and the extent and likelihood of linked components. Suggestions are made regarding features\u27 eligibility for listing on the National Register of Historic Places, both as individual sites and as components of a historic district

    Quincy and Torch Lake Railroad engine house facility management and interpretive plan

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    The “Quincy & Torch Lake Railroad Engine House Facility Management and Interpretive Plan was designed to serve as a guide to aid the Quincy Mine Hoist Association in their efforts to restore and interpret historic railroad resources under their stewardship. Early searches for existing management and interpretive plans demonstrated that similar plans were primarily produced by the National Park Service and were intended to guide large scale heritage sites that consist of a variety of cultural resources. This project adapts concepts found in those large scale management and interpretive site plans, to guide small scale site management, restoration, and interpretive projects. The document presents a three stage, second phase restoration process. Each stage of development is guided by a series of management and interpretive goals and objectives which were set for the engine house facility

    Romance of the Railroad

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    This collection begins with a factual article on railroads in southeast Georgia by John Paton, followed by a survey of changes in Georgia railroading during the career of Ed Milam. Also included is an account of the decline of a railroad town, Scarborough, Georgia by Dan Good and Robert Jenkins, as well as a series of photographs of Engineer John David Cannon with several locomotives. The closing article is “Railroads of South Carolina: 1830-1863” by Robert J. Stets.https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/bchs-pubs/1032/thumbnail.jp
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