2,740 research outputs found

    Taiwanese girls’ self-portraiture on a social networking site

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    An increasing number of young girls produce contents in social media on a everyday basis for the opportunities to express, explore and connect. Public misunderstanding and concern are about whether girls are being narcissistic and vain. Academic works address how girls exercise agency while negotiating structure in the construction of their gendered adolescent identities. This thesis is situated in relation to our hopes and fears about girls’ self-representation through digital media production, and examines the role that photographic self-portraiture plays in girls’ social relations, personal and gender identity work. The theoretical framework combines the perspectives of gender performativity and symbolic interactionism, supplemented by analyses of personal photography. This thesis chose as its case study the popular Taiwanese social networking site Wretch, and employed a mixed method of quantitative content analysis of 2000 self-portraits of teenagers to understand how they represent themselves, and qualitative online interviews with 42 girls aged 13-20 to learn about their relationships with self-portraiture. The content analysis shows that most teenagers represent themselves in a gender stereotypical manner, while some adopt non gender-specific styles to represent themselves as friendly, suggesting that teenagers may use ideals about femininity, masculinity and sociality as shortcuts to present themselves in a positive light. Interview findings reveal how girls use camera technologies and the affordance of SNS for visual self-disclosure, which isimportant for the development of theirinterpersonal relationships. The findings also suggest that self-portraiture is not simply an act of photographing a ‘reality’ of the self, but of formulating self-image(s) and identity in the process of making self-portraits. In self-portraiture, girls are constantly confronted with the ‘who am I’ question, and construct and revise their biographies as they manage an array of audiences from different contexts all collapsing in one space. Furthermore, selfportraiture creates a distance between the ‘I’ and the ‘me’, allowing one to ‘play’ with self-image(s) and identity. It creates a space for the negotiation of ideals and anxieties, for experiments with different subject positions that may be socially or individually rewarding, and it is through these seemingly casual endeavoursthat one gradually works out their position in the social world. The thesis contributes to the scholarship on girls’ media culture, and suggests current theoretical perspective be expanded in order to better understand different ways of ‘doing girlhood’

    Depicting Childhood. The Innocence of the Age as captured in Photographs and Postcards from Bukovina (1880-1920)

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    The children’s image in photographs and postcards is a formidable epistemological challenge that can facilitate the synchronization of individual or collective life stories, with certain aspects of social history. While in the Western historiography, the “history of children” has already a long tradition, in the Romanian historiography it never really received much interest; however, only in the last decade there appeared a few articles, studies and books on this domain. In Bukovina’s case, such a research “slips through fingers”, and the study of depicting childhood is still in its early stages. The set of images analyzed in the following article indicates a series of epoch features, constant and canonical, clichés borrowed from Central and Western Europe. They help to describe types of portraits (family, individual, specific solemn moments), poses and conventional models, more or less expressive, but which meet both public and private commands and expectations of the time. In other words, the documentary value of these visual resources in which the children appear is obvious. It favors the exploration of daily life and social customs that are still exposed to many questions

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    The Visual Worlds of Social Network Sites

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    The central form of communication on social network sites (sns) is the communication with and through images. Accordingly, the present volume highlights images and image-based communication on sns, such as Facebook, and on nightlife platforms, such as Tilllate. First, the authors analyze the two central image categories in depth - profile images and photo albums. What follows is the portrayal of dramaturgical and staging strategies of the (semi) professional photography on the nightlife platforms, which leads to an evaluation of the importance of the international glamour photography as a parameter of private photographic self-expression. Other questions that the authors ponder in the volume are: Which functions and meanings do images have for the communications between users on social network sites? To what extent could certain design characteristics in the image-based communication on sns establish themselves as prototypical staging patterns? Which staging traditions are followed thereby? Which staging strategies are followed on different online platforms by the users' (self) visualizations

    Snapshots of the Self: Exploring the Role of Online Mobile Photo Sharing in Identity Development among Adolescent Girls

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    A chapter written by Jenna Drenten for Online Consumer Behavior: Theory and Research in Social Media, Advertising and E-tail (2017)

    Normalisation and stigmatisation of obesity in UK newspapers: a visual content analysis

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    Obesity represents a major and growing global public health concern. The mass media play an important role in shaping public understandings of health, and obesity attracts much media coverage. This study offers the first content analysis of photographs illustrating UK newspaper articles about obesity. The researchers studied 119 articles and images from five major national newspapers. Researchers coded the manifest content of each image and article and used a graphical scale to estimate the body size of each image subject. Data were analysed with regard to the concepts of the normalisation and stigmatisation of obesity. Articles’ descriptions of subjects’ body sizes were often found to differ from coders’ estimates, and subjects described as obese tended to represent the higher values of the obese BMI range, differing from the distribution of BMI values of obese adults in the UK. Researchers identified a tendency for image subjects described as overweight or obese to be depicted in stereotypical ways that could reinforce stigma. These findings are interpreted as illustrations of how newspaper portrayals of obesity may contribute to societal normalisation and the stigmatisation of obesity, two forces that threaten to harm obese individuals and undermine public health efforts to reverse trends in obesity

    Research in Teaching Visual Arts a Archimboldoas Experience

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    The paintings of Giuseppe Archimboldo 1527-1593 populate the imaginations of children and adults of all times allowing the distance from the look of your images the visualization of new figures generating curiosity or even strange I tried to understand the relationships established between youth identities and their creative expressionsportraits and self portraits - artistic embodied in threedimensional structures which served as sources of research on teaching Drew up a proposal for readings and compositions plastic three-dimensional elements of nature or industrially produced selected and collected by the students of 5th and 6th grades in the subject of Visual Arts an elementary school in RS Brazil in 2007 Producing pictures full of visual sensory appeals to the touch and smell students recreating elements of everyday life curious figures exotic and inquisitive which express their identity form

    Developing Self-love, Self-worth, and Body Image Acceptance through the Arts

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    Drawing from personal experiences as an artist-teacher, student, and woman the author develops a lesson plan designed to promote self-worth and body image acceptance for adolescents. The supporting teaching philosophy and unit rationale describe ways in which teachers can draw from art history and contemporary art to support and empower students. Through the creation of safe spaces teachers can develop platforms for students to express the challenges and triumphs they may experience as they struggle to accept their respective bodies and self-images

    i Viewed Them Sick : Photography And Addiction Medicine As Activism During The speed Freak Crisis Of The Long 1960s

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    “Speed freak” was a pejorative term that emerged in the late 1960s to describe young people who binged on amphetamines, often by injection. The accessibility of amphetamines during the 1960s and early 1970s coupled with the emergence of a radical youth movement produced this distinctive subculture. This thesis will address responses to this drug crisis in two parts, from the perspective of two activists working in very different fields. In 1971, Larry Clark, a photographer, and David Smith, a physician, each published their seminal works on “speed freak” culture. Separated by half a country, they had enmeshed themselves in communities devastated by amphetamine abuse. Both used their work to enter the political sphere, drawing on the unique advantages of photography in Clark’s case and addiction medicine in Smith’s. And both were, in many ways, successful as advocates; they brought popular and legislative attention to the issue of amphetamine abuse. But the most salient connection between these two men is that, over time and as their political aspirations grew, both lost sight of nuanced human stories. They began to paint amphetamine users with broad strokes, and in doing so, reinforced negative stereotypes. Their response was understandable: speed users were a difficult group for which to advocate. Amphetamines are profoundly addictive, and, at high doses, they are associated with agitation, psychosis and violence. But amphetamine users were not faceless monsters – they had stories to tell. We continue to grapple with the challenges that drug users and other vulnerable, stigmatized populations necessarily present – today’s opioid crisis is most pressing. The dilemma inherent in Clark and Smith’s work is one of scale: how do you bring widespread attention to a cause and continue to make the human connections that are essential to preserve our patients’ dignity

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