3,573 research outputs found

    the case of the catholic schools

    Get PDF
    Elektronische Version der gedr. Ausg. 198

    “We Were the Outsiders and Treated as Such:” Community Activism and the Intersections of Ethnicity, Gender, Class, and Race Among Latinas in Milwaukee

    Get PDF
    This dissertation analyzes the activism of Latinas in Milwaukee during the 1970s and 1980s. I interviewed women involved in community organizing in that time and place; they shared with me their experiences, and their motivations related to community organizing campaigns. This dissertation explores how members of this group understood themselves to be outsiders, and how the shared outsider status among the Milwaukee Latinas and some white community organizers created solidarity to build Milwaukee’s Latin community. Drawing on in-depth interviews and archival research, I analyze the content of these stories, recognizing common issues of how each woman negotiated family, organizing campaigns, and the multiple power relations within each structure. As Milwaukee transitioned from Polish American dominance on Milwaukee’s south side, with the increase of African Americans on the north side and Latinos arriving on the south side, these communities collided. One consequence was the rise of Latina activism. As Polish Americans fled the central city, Milwaukee’s south side residents experienced racism and discrimination in the public-school system, housing policies, employment opportunities, and public safety. Mary Anne McNulty and her work with SWEAT Associates was a key influence in community organizing among Latinas. Her forty years of activism influenced the creation of Latin focused nonprofits and built a cadre of Latina and non-Latina organizers. The community organizing efforts of Latinas was done while negotiating and navigating a male, white-centric society. Analyzing the stories of Latina activists reveals how these women learned to become more visible, not only in the pan-Latino diaspora, but in the broader community. Latinas found their voice and told “herstory” or “ellacuenta.” In Spanish, ellacuenta translates roughly to “she tells a story,” and “she matters.” Latinas made a difference in Milwaukee working on issues that mattered to them, and to their families and children. My theoretical contribution to the scholarship of community organizing efforts is twofold. First, I use an intersectionality framework to draw attention to how the complexities of power and identity shaped how community organizers worked in Milwaukee. Second, I argue that Latinas engaged in activism using a “family” metaphor to engage and build solidarity in the community. This strong emphasis on creating a sense of belonging in the community along with activism is a practice I call “la extension familiar.” Creating a quasi-family in the community, key supporters in different campaigns became family-like members in the struggle for justices. Latinas valued the support of non-biological family members, but also encountered ambivalence in the process: They had to negotiate sexism, discrimination, and privileged power positions within their biological family, community organizing family, and the community at large

    Weeping All the Way to Zion: Vatican II, Catholic Social Ethics, and the Black Freedom Struggle in Milwaukee

    Get PDF
    The Second Vatican Council convened between October 1962 and December 1965. In the years immediately following, American Catholics, as well as co-religionists the world over, were left to interpret and navigate an event and literary corpus which had fundamentally recalibrated not only the dominant theological method for the Church, but also redefined its posture toward the world and social issues. The established traditions of Catholic Social Teaching (CST) as well as the paroxysms of Vatican II, figured prominently in the Milwaukee iteration of the Civil Rights Movement/Black Freedom Struggle, in which one of the most visible figures was progressive priest Rev. James E. Groppi (1930-1985). Employing nonviolent protest and preaching, Groppi pursued common cause with Milwaukee legislators like Lloyd Barbee and Velvalea “Vel” Phillips. However, the concept of Catholic thought and praxis as sympathetic to, and even a vehicle for, pro-Black racial activism angered many white Catholics in Milwaukee and often provoked rancor and obfuscation from episcopal authorities. Ultimately, the divergent rhetorical and theological/social deployments of Catholic dogma within the microcosm of Milwaukee point to Roman Catholicism as a massive historical entity unable to speak univocally to racial justice. Rather, the Roman Catholic tradition is complex and ambivalent, lending putative support to polarized social agendas, from the radical and progressive to the conservative and institutional

    Doctrina, Fides, Gubernatio: Messmer High School from 1926-2001

    Get PDF
    In 1926, the Archdiocese of Milwaukee dissertationed its first Diocesan high school, hoping thereby to provide Milwaukee\u27s north side with its own Catholic school. By 1984 the Archdiocese claimed that the combination of declining enrollment and rising operating costs left it no option other than permanently closing Messmer. In response, a small group of parents and community members aided by private philanthropy managed to redissertation the school shortly thereafter as an independent Catholic school. This reemergence suggested a compelling portrait of the meaning given to a school, even as ethnic, religious, and racial boundaries shifted. Modern studies tend to regard Catholic schools as academically outstanding and socially just institutions. In particular, Bryk, Holland and Lee\u27s Catholic Schools and the Common Good celebrates community and a belief in the importance of a Catholic education. They present extensive statistical evidence demonstrating the overall effectiveness of these schools and identify the three most significant features of Catholic schools - the emphasis on a rigorous academic curriculum for all students, an environment filled with caring, committed school personnel and parental support, and a strong identification with principles of social justice. Seemingly consistent with this view over time were Messmer\u27s college-preparatory curriculum despite limited budgets, religious and lay instructors who felt strongly about both Catholic education and Christian values, and an expressed commitment to social justice that shifted with Vatican II directives from global politics to local concerns, especially in relation to neighborhood integration and community diversity. While Bryk, Holland, and Lee\u27s assertions may be correct, it is important to examine these beliefs, and Messmer provides ample opportunity to study the widely held assumptions about a Catholic school. Therefore, this dissertation examines a seventy-five year period at Messmer High School to explore the extent to which it was able to meet these modern ideals

    Marquette University Slavic Institute Papers NO. 11

    Get PDF
    https://epublications.marquette.edu/mupress-book/1011/thumbnail.jp

    Wisconsin's German-Americans: From Ethnic Identity to Assimilation

    Get PDF
    corecore