99,165 research outputs found

    Investing in America's Health 2012: A State-By-State Look at Public Health Funding and Key Health Facts

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    Examines federal and state public health funding for preventive care and state variations in disease rates, healthcare access, and other data. Calls for adequate levels of investment on a sustained basis and cites examples of prevention efforts

    Some Post-Pliocene Buried Soils of Central United States

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    Myths and Realities of American Political Geography

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    The division of America into red states and blue states misleadingly suggests that states are split into two camps, but along most dimensions, like political orientation, states are on a continuum. By historical standards, the number of swing states is not particularly low, and America's cultural divisions are not increasing. But despite the flaws of the red state/blue state framework, it does contain two profound truths. First, the heterogeneity of beliefs and attitudes across the United States is enormous and has always been so. Second, political divisions are becoming increasingly religious and cultural. The rise of religious politics is not without precedent, but rather returns us to the pre-New Deal norm. Religious political divisions are so common because religious groups provide politicians the opportunity to send targeted messages that excite their base.

    State of Health Equity Movement, 2011 Update Part B: Catalog of Activities DRA Project Report No. 11-02

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    State of Health Equity Movement, 2011 Update Part B: Catalog of Activities DRA Project Report No. 11-0

    Myths and Realities of American Political Geography

    Get PDF
    The division of America into red states and blue states misleadingly suggests that states are split into two camps, but along most dimensions, like political orientation, states are on a continuum. By historical standards, the number of swing states is not particularly low, and America's cultural divisions are not increasing. But despite the flaws of the red state/blue state framework, it does contain two profound truths. First, the heterogeneity of beliefs and attitudes across the United States is enormous and has always been so. Second, political divisions are becoming increasingly religious and cultural. The rise of religious politics is not without precedent, but rather returns us to the pre-New Deal norm. Religious political divisions are so common because religious groups provide politicians the opportunity to send targeted messages that excite their base.

    F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America's Future 2011

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    Outlines 2008-10 national and state obesity rates, health indicators, and policies to address the epidemic; regional, economic, and social barriers to healthy choices; impact of the 2010 healthcare reform and Let's Move initiative; and recommendations

    Rhodora

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    v.52 (1950

    The Geographic Distribution of US Executions

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    We review statistical patterns of the geographic distribution of US executions, compare them to homicides, and demonstrate extremely high degrees of concentration of executions in the modern period compared to previous historical periods. We further show that this unprecedented level of concentration has been increasing over the past 20 years. We demonstrate that it is virtually uncorrelated with factors related to homicides. Finally, we show that it corresponds to a statistical distribution associated with “self-reinforcing” processes: a power-law or exponential distribution. These findings stand whether we look at individual counties within death-penalty states, across the 50 states of the United States, or look at the international distribution of executions across countries in recent years. The substantive conclusion from the statistical patterns observed is that these cannot be explained merely by random variation around some general average. Rather, localities start down a path, then are reinforced in their pathways. There appears to be little to no logic about why certain counties are the high-use counties, whereas the vast majority have never executed a single individual in 40 years of experience with the modern death penalty, often in spite of thousands of homicides. Our research indicates that a main determinant of whether an individual will be executed is not the crime they commit, but the jurisdiction’s experience with executing others. This is not acceptable—legally, morally, or constitutionally

    Challenges to Fair Elections 2: Provisional Ballots

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    The 2000 election will be remembered as a national debacle in which millions of citizens were denied the right to vote and have that vote be properly counted. To remedy the problems of 2000, Congress passed the Help America Vote Act of 2002 (HAVA). One of HAVA's principal provisions required states to adopt a system of "failsafe" voting in which a person who goes to the polls, but whose name is not on the voter lists or who cannot produce the necessary identification, is allowed to vote on a provisional ballot. These provisional ballots will only be counted if elections officials are able to subsequently determine that the individual was eligible to vote. While Congress may have scored points with the rhetoric of "fail-safe" voting, many states have taken advantage of HAVA's vague language to manipulate provisional balloting rules and again deny otherwise eligible Americans their right to participate in the democratic process. Much like patients sent home with a placebo, many provisional voters think they are being given the vote, when in fact they are receiving a false promise

    From Mounds to Monasteries: A Look at Spiro and Other Centers Through The Use of Metaphor

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    Previous study of the extensive and elaborate funerary offerings at the Spiro site have explained their presence by an exchange system with Spiro functioning as a gateway center. More recently, Schambach has argued extensively and passionately for Spiro’s role as an entrepôt redistributive center. However, this argument fails to account for much of the accumulation of funerary items present at Spiro. As an alternative, I propose that some ceremonial centers such as Spiro functioned solely as religious centers, much like the monasteries of medieval Europe with parallels in the use of architecture, economic support, relics, and the treatment of individuals at death. A model based on the metaphor of monastic life provides greater explanatory potential than that of the economically-driven entepôt
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