2,686 research outputs found

    Urban Park Design, Level of Enclosure and People’s Satisfaction: A Comparative Analysis of Al Jahili and Al Selimi Parks in Al Ain, UAE

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    The purpose of this research is to understand how physical characteristics of parks with a particular focus on different levels of enclosure affect park usage level and user patterns in the city of Al-Ain, UAE. Parks in Al Ain are present in different parts of the city and provide plenty of opportunities for leisure and recreation. Despite this diversity, parks located within the inner city area remain the most popular among the residents of Al-Ain, and have expanded significantly in the last few years. Specifically, this thesis aims to understand how the levels of usage and the behavioral patterns of the park users vary at parks of different levels of enclosure. In order to achieve the aforementioned aim, data from two different parks with different levels of enclosure are considered. Data from the two parks is compared and the effects of several factors on a visitor’s choices are explored. This research includes an exploration of who visits the parks, activities taking place and their locations. The investigation also explores people perception thoughts and concerns about their use of parks. Data analyzed in this research is collected through field observations and interviews with park users. ArcGIS was the primary tool used for coding and mapping the people’s behaviour and identifying patterns and related to a given park’s usage. Survey questionnaire and interviews were used to understand people’s thoughts and perceptions and how different park characteristics could influence their use of the park. Results of this research will enhance the understanding of how people experience the different park characteristics and different levels of enclosure. In the future, this might serve as a guide for the city council to better design and organize parks and in turn avoid exclusion of some groups from park use and would enhance the overall experience of users

    Waters of belonging : Al-miyahu Tajma'unah: Arabic Australians and the Georges River Parklands

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    This series arises from Parklands, Culture and Communities, a project which looks at how cultural diversity shapes people's understandings and use of the Georges River and green spaces in Sydney's south west. We focus on the experiences of four local communities (Aboriginal, Vietnamese, Arabic and Anglo Australians) and their relationships with the river, parks and each other. Culturally diverse uses and views have not often been recognised in Australia in park and green space management models, which tend to be based on Anglo-Celtic 'norms' about nature and recreation. UTS and the Office of Environment and Heritage supported this research because they have been interested in how the more diverse cultural knowledges held by Australians today might offer support for managing green spaces more effectively

    Waters of belonging : Al-miyahu Tajma'unah: Arabic Australians and the Georges River Parklands

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    This book, Rivers of Belonging, includes the stories of Arabic Australians about the parks and rivers of their homeland as well as those about the parks on the Georges River.This book arises from Parklands, Culture and Communities, a project which looks at how cultural diversity shapes people's understandings and use of the Georges River and green spaces in Sydney's south west. Culturally diverse uses and views have not often been recognised in Australia in park and green space management models, which tend to be based on Anglo-Celtic 'norms' about nature and recreation. This book focusses on the experiences of four local communities - Aboriginal, Vietnamese, Arabic and Anglo Australians - and their relationships with the river, parks and each other

    Waters of Belonging

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    This book arises from Parklands, Culture and Communities, a project which looks at how cultural diversity shapes people's understandings and use of the Georges River and green spaces in Sydney's south west. Culturally diverse uses and views have not often been recognised in Australia in park and green space management models, which tend to be based on Anglo-Celtic 'norms' about nature and recreation. This book focusses on the experiences of four local communities - Aboriginal, Vietnamese, Arabic and Anglo Australians - and their relationships with the river, parks and each other

    Battlefield to Baseball Diamond: The Niagara Parks Commission and Queenston Heights Park

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    Between the War of 1812's end and the late 1920s Queenston Heights was redefined from being primarily a place of memory associated with the War of 1812 to being for the most part a place of recreation. The site of a significant War of 1812 battle, until the late nineteenth century it drew growing numbers of tourists, many of whom wanted to feel closer to its wartime past. Beginning in the late nineteenth century the site's popularity for recreation increased, and by the 1920s Queenston Heights Park was a destination where thousands of people went to enjoy recreational activities such as picnics and sports. The Niagara Parks Commission, which owned the site from 1895, facilitated this transformation. The Commission saw Queenston Heights more as a park than a historic site and worked to create a recreational space that would draw tourists and increase revenue. By the 1920s the park featured attractions such as playing fields, picnic shelters, tennis courts, a restaurant, and a souvenir stand. There was little opposition to these changes, which at times jeopardized the historic landscape. Although Queenston Heights' commemorative meanings were no longer closely associated with its battlefield landscape, these meanings were increasingly invested in the imposing Brock Monument. This allowed the Commission's development of the battlefield to continue unabated, and under the Commission the landscape of the former battlefield became increasingly distanced from its wartime past

    Wild Tots and Wild Babies: An evaluation report for Suffolk Wildlife Trust.

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    Park Lites Fall 1985

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    Park Lites was the official publication of the Division of State Parks and Recreation that ran from approximately 1971-1994

    Intersections of Place, Time, and Entertainment in Rural Nebraska in the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries

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    As newcomers developed Nebraska settlements in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, they began to shape the space. This study explores the intersections of place, time, and entertainment in rural Nebraska from the beginning of European American settlement in the late 19th century to the end of the Great Depression. Through such examinations, we can better understand the historical geographies of individual and collective human experience. With such knowledge, we can then recognize how entertainment reflected social life, sense of place, place attachment, and the intricacies and larger scale trends of race, ethnicity, gender, age, class, nationality, and religion. In this work, a variety of sources are mined and examined through primarily qualitative methods. The acknowledgment that research is subjective and selective is present in researching, writing, and producing the narrative. Literature from a variety of disciplines informs the research. Such a study adds to scholarship by incorporating contemporary approaches, methodologies, and theories, such as humanistic, post-modern, feminist, and post-colonial, to the geographic case study approach that has been criticized for being too descriptive and lacking theory. Each chapter contains an examination of leisure activities. Chapter 1, entitled “Everyday Leisure Activities,” explores a wide variety of common entertainments available to people living in and visiting rural Nebraska. The rest of the study examines specific activities via case studies. The Walter Savidge Amusement Company in the early 20th century is the heart of Chapter 2, “Traveling Shows.” Chapter 3, “Ethnic- Religious Entertainment: The German Russian Mennonites of Henderson” demonstrates how leisure activities could vary from the mainstream depending upon a group’s ethnic, national, and religious characteristics. Chapters 4 and 5 explore the state’s amusement parks in the early 20th century by discovering the personality of The Long Pine Amusement Park during its first eight years. The last section, “The Broader Context,” sifts out themes of race, ethnicity, gender, class, age, nationality, and religion, illustrating how they were manifested in entertainment. Adviser: David J. Wishar

    Lisbon public parks: Development of real-world user scenarios

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    A população mundial está a aumentar. Até 2030, a população mundial poderá atingir 8,6 mil milhões de pessoas. Nos dias que correm, cerca de 53,9% da população mundial reside em cidades. Até 2050 a previsão é que este número aumente para 68,4%. Ao mesmo tempo, prevê-se que a percentagem de pessoas com mais de 60 anos aumente de 12% para 22%, e que em países este número atinja 33%. Diversos estudos referem a importância que parques públicos e espaços verdes têm na contribuição para uma maior qualidade de vida e bem-estar. O principal objetivo desta Tese é compreender que tipo de problemas existem nos parques públicos de Lisboa e perceber como o design pode melhorar a experiência do utilizador nos parques públicos de Lisboa. Esta Tese está dividida em seis capítulos: Introdução, Estado da arte, Metodologia de investigação, Discussão, Cenários reais de utilizador e Conclusão. Os resultados deste trabalho reforçam a importância da utilização de metodologias de Design Thinking e Design participativo na reflexão e/ou reformulação de parques públicos. Além disso, este trabalho destaca a importância de entender o verdadeiro utilizador, visto que soluções não são universais e precisam ser pensadas de acordo com a localização de cada parque. Esta Tese pretende inspirar novas ideias de investigação, através da identificação de lacunas no conhecimento. Questões abertas e desafiantes sobre novas soluções para parques públicos são propostas e identificadas para trabalhos futuros, abrindo espaço para pensar em novas soluções que possam contribuir para futuros parques públicos “inteligentes”.The global population is growing. By 2030, the world population will reach 8.6 billion people. Nowadays, about 53.9% of the world's population resides in cities, and by 2050, the percentage is expected to rise to 68.4%. At the same time, the percentage of people over 60 is expected to rise from 12% to 22%, and 33% residing in developed countries. Studies have shown that public parks and green spaces can contribute to a higher quality of life and well being. The main purpose of this study is to understand the type of problems exist in Lisbon public parks and to speculate how design and technology could improve the user experience at Lisbon public parks. The thesis is divided into six chapters: Introduction, State of the Art, Research Methodology, Discussion, Real-world user scenarios, and Conclusion. The findings of this study underscore the significance of incorporating Design Thinking and participatory Design approaches when conceptualizing or revitalizing public parks. Additionally, this research underscores the necessity of comprehending the specific park user demographic, as solutions cannot be one-size-fits-all and must be tailored to the park's unique context. The thesis aims to stimulate fresh avenues of research by pinpointing knowledge gaps. It presents forward-looking and formidable challenges in the realm of innovative public park solutions for future exploration. This paves the way for contemplating novel approaches that can contribute to the evolution of “smart” public parks in the future
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