381,808 research outputs found

    Backpack Food Ideas

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    Items to include in a backpack nutrition program.This archival publication may not reflect current scientific knowledge or recommendations. Current information available from the University of Minnesota Extension: https://www.extension.umn.edu

    Creative School Fundraising

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    Ideas for raising money without the sale of low-nutrition foods.This archival publication may not reflect current scientific knowledge or recommendations. Current information available from the University of Minnesota Extension: https://www.extension.umn.edu

    Federal child nutrition programs are important to rural households

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    This brief, based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau, examines how rural families use four of the major federal child nutrition programs. It finds that 29 percent of rural families with children participate but that there are barriers to these nutrition programs, such as the lack of public transportation and high operating costs for rural schools and child care programs

    Nutrition Education in Vermont Public Schools

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    Introduction. Despite positive changes, childhood obesity and food insecurity remain prevalent across the country. Vermont is not immune to these issues. We set out to: research the level of nutrition education Vermont elementary schools provide their students, understand teacher perceptions of these programs, and recommend ways to fill identified gaps. Methods. Our study is a cross-sectional survey of Vermont educators around nutrition education. The survey consisted of 17 questions, used LimeSurvey, and included demographic and nutrition education questions. The survey was distributed statewide through newsletters and list-servers. Results. 64 responses met inclusion criteria. Vermont elementary school (K-6) teachers report a mean satisfaction score of 2.51 out of 5.0 for their schools\u27 current nutrition education programs. School nurses reported a score of 2.5 out of 5.0. Highest satisfaction scores included school administrators and health and wellness coordinators (3.3 out of 5.0). When comparing teachers to non-classroom educators (administrators and nutrition educators) data showed a significant difference between high satisfaction (3-5) and low satisfaction (1-2); (Fischer p = 0.009). Overall, Vermont elementary school teachers report a high level of knowledge about nutrition, (4.1/5.0), but a lower level of understanding in their students (2.5/5.0). Conclusions. Given teacher perceptions regarding current school nutrition education programs, development and implementation of a state-wide nutrition education curriculum with dedicated teaching time may be warranted. Programs recommended by the CDC include Eat Well & Get Moving and Planet Health, designed by the Harvard School of Public Health. These could be adapted as a framework for Vermont.https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/comphp_gallery/1244/thumbnail.jp

    EFFECTS OF FOOD ASSISTANCE AND NUTRITION PROGRAMS ON NUTRITION AND HEALTH: VOLUME 4, EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF THE LITERATURE REVIEW

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    This report provides a summary of a comprehensive review and synthesis of published research on the impact of USDA's domestic food and nutrition assistance programs on participants' nutrition and health outcomes. The outcome measures reviewed include food expenditures, household nutrient availability, dietary intake, other measures of nutrition status, food security, birth outcomes, breastfeeding behaviors, immunization rates, use and cost of health care services, and selected nonhealth outcomes, such as academic achievement and school performance (children) and social isolation (elderly). The report is one of four volumes produced by a larger study that includes Volume 1, Research Design; Volume 2, Data Sources; Volume 3, Literature Review; and Volume 4, Executive Summary of the Literature Review. The review examines the research on 15 USDA food assistance and nutrition programs but tends to focus on the largest ones for which more research is available: food stamps, school feeding programs, and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Over half of USDA's budget - $41.6 billion in fiscal year 2003 - was devoted to food assistance and nutrition programs that provide low-income families and children with access to a healthy diet.Dietary intake, food expenditures, nutrient availability, nutrient intake, nutritional status, nutrition and health outcomes, USDAs food assistance and nutrition programs, Food Security and Poverty,

    Successful Community Nutrition Programming:lessons from Kenya,Tanzania,and Uganda

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    Learning from success is the most effective and efficient way of learning.This report brings together the main findings of a series of assessments of successful community nutrition programming carried out in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda between 1999 and 2000. The overall aim of the assessments was to identify key lessons, or the main driving forces behind the successful processes and outcomes in these programs. Such elements of success fundamentally have to do with both what was done and how it was done. Experience with community-based nutrition programming, as documented in various syntheses and reviews during the 1990s, does show that malnutrition can be effectively addressed on a large scale, at reasonable cost, through appropriate programs and strategies, and backed up by sustained political support. In most cases, successful attempts to overcome malnutrition originate with participatory, community-based nutrition programs undertaken in parallel with supportive sectoral actions directed toward nutritionally at-risk groups. Such actions are often enabled and supported by policies aimed at improving access by the poor to adequate social services, improving women’s status and education, and\ud fostering equitable economic growth. Successful community-based programs are not islands of excellence existing in an imperfect world. Rather, part of their success has to do with contextual factors that provide an enabling or supportive environment. Some of these contextual factors are particularly influenced by policy, some less so. Contextual factors may include, for example, high literacy rates, women’s empowerment, community organizational capacity and structures, appropriate legislation. Nutrition program managers cannot normally influence contextual factors, at least in the short term.\ud In addition to favorable contextual factors, certain program factors contribute to successful programs, such as the design, implementation, and/or management of the program or project, which can, of course, be influenced by program managers. Both contextual and program factors, and the way they interact, need to be identified in order to understand the dynamics behind success. In 1998, under the Greater Horn of Africa Initiative (GHAI) supported by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), nutrition coalitions were formed in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. These nutrition coalitions, comprising individuals representing government, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), donors, academic institutions, and the private sector, seek to advance the nutrition agenda both in policy and programming through coordination and advocacy efforts. One of the first tasks of the nutrition coalitions, under the leadership of the Program for Applied Technologies in Health (PATH) in Kenya, the Tanzania Food and Nutrition Centre (TFNC) in Tanzania, and the African Medical Research Foundation (AMREF) in Uganda, was to prepare an inventory of community nutrition programs in their respective countries and identify of better practices in community nutrition programming. Country teams, supported by USAID/REDSO/ESA and LINKAGES/AED, then selected three successful programs in their respective countries based on preestablished "process" and "outcome" criteria. UNICEF has a long history of promoting and supporting community-based programs in Eastern and Southern Africa and has supported many reviews and evaluations. As part of its continued effort to strengthen community-based programs by learning from new success stories, UNICEF also identified for review a relatively large scale successful program in Tanzania\u

    Eradicating malnutrition income growth or nutrition programs?: essay from IFPRI's 1999-2000 Annual Report

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    Recent research from IFPRI and its partners shows the potential for income growth to improve nutritional status. Encouragingly, income growth indeed contributes to improved nutritional status in 12 countries studied. The authors show how nutrition programs can reduce malnutrition faster, how better nutrition will raise income. They conclude that income affects nutrition, and nutrition in turn affects income. This can be a vicious circle or a virtuous one. Poverty reduction and effective direct nutrition interventions are needed to move us from the vicious to the virtuous.Malnutrition., Nutritional status, income growth, Nutrition programs, Poverty alleviation,

    Running on Empty: Nutritional Access for Children in Cook County, IL, Executive Summary

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    In an effort to make informed program expansion and improvement decisions, the Greater Chicago Food Depository commissioned the Social IMPACT Research Center of Heartland Alliance to conduct a study of child nutrition program coverage and child nutrition and hunger in Cook County, Illinois. ** This study examined the geographic coverage of child nutrition programs to identify areas that have the greatest number of unserved children and have the worst program coverage. The study also took an in-depth look at the nutritional lives of children attending summer nutrition programs. Insights in these two areas are vital to helping organizations like the Greater Chicago Food Depository make sound programmatic and expansion decisions that will best meet the nutritional and hunger needs of Cook County's most vulnerable children

    Running on Empty: Nutritional Access for Children in Cook County, Illinois

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    In an effort to make informed program expansion and improvement decisions, the Greater Chicago Food Depository commissioned the Social IMPACT Research Center of Heartland Alliance to conduct a study of child nutrition program coverage and child nutrition and hunger in Cook County, Illinois.This study examined the geographic coverage of child nutrition programs to identify areas that have the greatest number of unserved children and have the worst program coverage. The study also took an in-depth look at the nutritional lives of children attending summer nutrition programs. Insights in these two areas are vital to helping organizations like the Greater Chicago Food Depository make sound programmatic and expansion decisions that will best meet the nutritional and hunger needs of Cook County's most vulnerable children

    EFFECTS OF FOOD ASSISTANCE AND NUTRITION PROGRAMS ON NUTRITION AND HEALTH: VOLUME 3, LITERATURE REVIEW

    Get PDF
    This report provides a comprehensive review and synthesis of published research on the impact of USDA's domestic food and nutrition assistance programs on participants' nutrition and health outcomes. The outcome measures reviewed include food expenditures, household nutrient availability, dietary intake, other measures of nutrition status, food security, birth outcomes, breastfeeding behaviors, immunization rates, use and cost of health care services, and selected nonhealth outcomes, such as academic achievement and school performance (children) and social isolation (elderly). The report is one of four volumes produced by a larger study that includes Volume 1, Research Design; Volume 2, Data Sources; Volume 3, Literature Review; and Volume 4, Executive Summary of the Literature Review. The review examines the research on 15 USDA food assistance programs but tends to focus on the largest ones for which more research is available: food stamps, school feeding programs, and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Over half of USDA's budget - $41.6 billion in fiscal year 2003 - was devoted to food assistance and nutrition programs that provide low-income families and children with access to a healthy diet.Dietary intake, food expenditures, nutrient availability, nutrient intake, nutritional status, nutrition and health outcomes, USDA, Food Security and Poverty,
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