476,089 research outputs found

    APPENDIX A: CONFERENCE AGENDA

    Get PDF
    This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.This publication contains many links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.Made available by the Northern Territory Library via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT)

    IAD annual report

    Get PDF
    The Institute for Aboriginal Development Incorporated (IAD) was established by the Uniting Church in 1969 to assist community development for Aboriginal people and provide cross-cultural education between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal society. It is now an independent Aboriginal community-controlled language resource centre and adult education centre serving the Aboriginal community of Central Australia. General IAD activities include: * education programs which range from literacy and numeracy to vocational and higher education level courses; * an Aboriginal language and culture centre specialising in language cross-culture and cultural maintenance programs, as well as providing interpreter services and language research * a publishing arm, IAD Press, which produces material on the Aboriginal people, language and culture of Central Australia

    Adopting national vegetation guidelines and the National Vegetation Information System (NVIS) framework in the Northern Territory

    Get PDF
    Guidelines and core attributes for site-based vegetation surveying and mapping developed for the Northern Territory, are relevant to botanical research, forestry typing, rangeland monitoring and reporting on the extent and condition of native and non-native vegetated landscapes. These initiatives are consistent with national vegetation guidelines and the National Vegetation Information System (NVIS) framework. This paper provides a synopsis of vegetation site data collection, classification and mapping in the Northern Territory, and discusses the benefits of consistency between the guidelines, core attributes and the NVIS framework; both of which has an emphasis on the NVIS hierarchical classification system for describing structural and floristic attributes of vegetation. The long-term aim of the NVIS framework is that national attributes are adopted at regional levels to enable comparability of vegetation information within survey and jurisdictional boundaries in the Northern Territory and across Australia. The guidelines and core attributes are incorporated in current and future vegetation survey and mapping programs in the Northern Territory

    Northern Territory safe streets audit

    Get PDF
    This audit examined crime and safety issues in the Northern Territory urban communities of Darwin, Katherine and Alice Springs to help inform effective strategies to reduce the actual and perceived risk of victimisation. Abstract This Special Report is a research driven response to community concerns regarding the level of crime and fear of crime in the Northern Territory. The Northern Institute at Charles Darwin University and the Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC) were commissioned by the Northern Territory Police Force (NT Police) to undertake the NT Safe Streets Audit. The purpose of the Safe Streets Audit was to examine crime and safety issues in the Northern Territory urban communities of Darwin, Katherine and Alice Springs and to help inform effective strategies to reduce the actual and perceived risk of victimisation. The audit involved a literature review exploring issues impacting on the fear of crime in the Northern Territory, focus groups with a range of stakeholders in Darwin, Alice Springs and Katherine, the analysis of media articles on crime and policing, the analysis of incident data from NT Police on assault offences and public disorder incidents, and a rapid evidence assessment of the effectiveness of strategies targeting NT crime problems. Implications for future crime reduction approaches in the Northern Territory were then identified

    Australia (Northern Territory)

    Get PDF
    Covering more than 247 million acres, an area larger than California, Colorado, and New Mexico combined, Northern Australia is one of the few remaining largescale natural areas left on Earth

    Particular aspects of geo-ecologic assessment in geo-eco-socio-economic approach to the development of northern territories

    Full text link
    In today’s context, the preservation of territory’s ecosystem, when it becomes involved in the economic turnover, requires preemptive geo-ecological assessment aimed at identifying the extent of its sustainability to expected anthropogenic impact. The analysis of the existing methodological approaches to geo-ecological assessment allows to conclude that they are often standardized and can be equally applied to the various types of territories. The goal of this research study is to develop a methodological approach to the geo- ecological assessment of a territory, which allows to consider the specific character of the northern territories in the Ural region. This article proposes a new methodological approach to geo-ecological assessment that takes into account the specific character of the northern territories in the Ural region and is based on assessing the saturation of the natural resource potential of the territory and the intensity of its restoration after the anthropogenic impact. The approach relies on the principle of scoring assessment of a territory, which can be explained by the large surface areas of the assessed territory and by the fact that these assessments are proposed to take place at the pre-project stage of the development of the territory. Such approach allows to consider the specific aspects of the ecosystem of the territory, namely, its ability for self-restoration and self-cleaning during and after the economic development which, in turn, allows to make a general selection of the area of economic activity while minimizing the damage caused by violating the ecosystem of the territory and preserving its resource potential. This article is intended for the specialists and students dealing with the issues of geo-ecological assessment of a territory.This article has been prepared under Grant No. 14–18–00456 Substantiating the Geo-Eco-Socio-Economic Approach to the Development of Strategic Natural Resource Potential of Northern Understudied Territories as Part of the Investment Project The Arctic—Central Asia provided by the Russian Science Foundation

    The Northern Territory Future

    Get PDF
    As the Northern Territory moves toward statehood, there are many options available for Northern Territory peoples and regions already tried abroad. At the very least the Australian Parliament should ensure that Northern Territory indigenous representatives can maintain their vital interests and design their future in a part of Australia where they are and will remain the permanent residents, in country truly theirs
    corecore