15,845 research outputs found

    What\u27s in a Name? Racial and Ethnic Classifications and the Meaning of Hispanic/Latino in the United States

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    The first national census was conducted in 1790, and has been repeated at ten year intervals ever since. While census taking has been consistent, the way individuals have been counted and categorized on the basis of race and ethnicity has varied over time. This paper examines how the official census definition of Latinos has changed over the twenty-two census periods. The modifications of the official definition of this group are discussed in relation to changes in national borders, variations in methodology used for census data gathering, and shifting political contexts

    Anarchy, State, and Dystopia: Venezuelan Economic Institutions before the Advent of Oil.

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    This paper studies the evolution of Venezuelan economic institutions before the emergence of oil exploitation in 1920. We argue that by 1920 Venezuela had developed a highly centralized state and a professionalized military. These two institutions ensured that growing oil revenues would strengthen the state structure and protected Venezuela from the resource-conflict trap into which many oil-abundant countries have fallen. We also argue that the failure to develop institutions that could mediate between sectoral demands and the state, the subordination of property rights to political imperatives and the political dominance of the commercial-financial elite conditioned the nation’s response to the post-1920 influx of oil revenues.

    Publications Catalogue 2003-04

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    Lists publications produced by, or in association with, the Institute of Latin American Studies

    Monarchism and Liberalism in Mexico's Nineteenth Century

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    The battle of Detroit and anti-communism in the depression era

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    This article is an exploration of Diego Rivera's visit to Detroit in 1932-3. It seeks to use his experiences, and in particular the spectacular popular reaction to the Detroit Industry murals he pointed, as a prism for anaylsing varieties of anti-communism in. Detroit in the depression era. The article argues that close relationships between Private capitalists, most notably Hen?)) Ford and a Mexican communist, expose contradictions in big business's use of anti-communism in the interwar period, and suggest that anti-communism was a more complicated phenomenon than simply a tool for the promotion of free enterprise'. Moreover, by comparing the public reaction to the artists' work with their original intent, it is possible to see how members of Detroit's society unconsciously, used anti-communism to sublimate broader concerns over race and ethnicity gender, politics, and religiosity in a region in the throes of profound social change. The article seeks to highlight elements of these latent anxieties and fears in order to show how anti-communism acted as a vessel for social debate

    Honor and Compromise, and Getting History Right

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    White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly does not have a Ph.D. in history, although he does have two master’s degrees, in Strategic Studies (from the National Defense University) and in National Security Affairs from the Georgetown School of Foreign Service. So perhaps it was simply that he believed what he said about the Civil War this past Monday on Laura Ingraham’s new Fox News ‘Ingraham Angle’ was so innocuous that he could also believe that it wouldn’t even become a blip on anyone’s radar screen. (excerpt

    Publications Catalogue 2006-07

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    Lists publications produced by, or in association with, the Institute for the Study of the Americas

    Publications Catalogue 2008-9

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    Lists publications produced by, or in association with, the Institute for the Study of the Americas

    TIM MARSHALL: PRISONERS OF GEOGRAPHY STUDY GUIDE, 2017

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    Study Guid

    Lost Decades: Lessons from Post-Independence Latin America for Today's Africa

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    Africa and Latin America secured their independence from European colonial rule a century and half apart: most of Latin America after 1820 and most of Africa after 1960. Despite the distance in time and space, they share important similarities. In each case independence was followed by political instability, violent conflict and economic stagnation lasting for about a half-century (lost decades). The parallels suggest that Africa might be exiting from a period of post-imperial collapse and entering a period of relative political stability and economic growth, as did Latin America a century and a half earlier.
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