1,042,514 research outputs found

    Rattan nursery (1)

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    The Philippines is endowed with the rich natural resources inherent in many tropical countries. The plant species are so diverse that many plant forms have become integral components in the way of life of many Filipinos. Aside from the woody trees that are the major and dominant components of forest ecosystems, rattans are considered as highly important non-wood forest resources. Over time the rattans became very important sources of livelihood and the mainstays of the global cane industry common to most ASEAN countries. In a recent report, the Philippines was regarded as the centre of the rattan furniture industry and highly acclaimed with the best and most elegant designs known in the world. Rattan poles and finished products have been the top exports. Like any forest product derived from the wild in high demand, rattans in natural stands suffered from heavy extraction. Such pressure was felt in the 1970s, prompting the government to impose a ban on the export of raw materials. This situation was however, partly addressed by replenishing the raw materials by artificial means through plantation establishment. Interest was sustained in rattan nursery improvement because of the governments’ policy of using rattans as reforestation species to rehabilitate watershed areas with added productive value, along with other commercial species. The integration of rattans in forest plantation development opened avenues for livelihood development options for upland dwellers on one hand and for future augmentation of supply of resources on the other. Government projects and tenurial agreements that include rattan are the Upland Development Projects (UDP), Community Forestry Projects (CFP), the Community Based Forest Management (CBFM), the Socialized Integrated Forest Management Agreement (SIFMA) and the Integrated Forest Management Agreement (IFMA). In the private sector the National Development Corporation in collaboration with the Paper Industries Corporation and what was then Provident Farms, Inc. engaged in massive plantation development on a commercial scale. This developed opportunities to explore practical methods of rattan nursery protocols, including seed germination. One step towards the establishment of a plantation is the propagation of planting stock in the nursery. Initially, the government spearheaded the trial planting of this relatively new plantation crop. The dearth of technology on rattan nurseries compelled the government to develop appropriate methods in order to be able to establish plantations. Research work was conducted to explore the technology for rattan seed germination, nursery establishment and silviculture. Thus, the protocols for raising planting stock were developed and were disseminated by various means such as print medium (How to Series, Research Digest), pilot demonstrations and training.Community rattan nurser

    Rattan nursery (2)

    Get PDF
    The Philippines is endowed with the rich natural resources inherent in many tropical countries. The plant species are so diverse that many plant forms have become integral components in the way of life of many Filipinos. Aside from the woody trees that are the major and dominant components of forest ecosystems, rattans are considered as highly important non-wood forest resources. Over time the rattans became very important sources of livelihood and the mainstays of the global cane industry common to most ASEAN countries. In a recent report, the Philippines was regarded as the centre of the rattan furniture industry and highly acclaimed with the best and most elegant designs known in the world. Rattan poles and finished products have been the top exports. Like any forest product derived from the wild in high demand, rattans in natural stands suffered from heavy extraction. Such pressure was felt in the 1970s, prompting the government to impose a ban on the export of raw materials. This situation was however, partly addressed by replenishing the raw materials by artificial means through plantation establishment. Interest was sustained in rattan nursery improvement because of the governments’ policy of using rattans as reforestation species to rehabilitate watershed areas with added productive value, along with other commercial species. The integration of rattans in forest plantation development opened avenues for livelihood development options for upland dwellers on one hand and for future augmentation of supply of resources on the other. Government projects and tenurial agreements that include rattan are the Upland Development Projects (UDP), Community Forestry Projects (CFP), the Community Based Forest Management (CBFM), the Socialized Integrated Forest Management Agreement (SIFMA) and the Integrated Forest Management Agreement (IFMA). In the private sector the National Development Corporation in collaboration with the Paper Industries Corporation and what was then Provident Farms, Inc. engaged in massive plantation development on a commercial scale. This developed opportunities to explore practical methods of rattan nursery protocols, including seed germination. One step towards the establishment of a plantation is the propagation of planting stock in the nursery. Initially, the government spearheaded the trial planting of this relatively new plantation crop. The dearth of technology on rattan nurseries compelled the government to develop appropriate methods in order to be able to establish plantations. Research work was conducted to explore the technology for rattan seed germination, nursery establishment and silviculture. Thus, the protocols for raising planting stock were developed and were disseminated by various means such as print medium (How to Series, Research Digest), pilot demonstrations and training.Community rattan nurser

    AGENDA: Coping with Water Scarcity in River Basins Worldwide: Lessons Learned from Shared Experiences

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    Water scarcity is increasingly dominating headlines throughout the world. In the southwestern USA, the looming water shortages on the Colorado River system and the unprecedented drought in California are garnering the greatest attention. Similar stories of scarcity and crisis can be found across the globe, suggesting an opportunity for sharing lessons and innovations. For example, the Colorado River and Australia\u27s Murray-Darling Basin likely can share many lessons, as both systems were over-allocated, feature multiple jurisdictions, face similar climatic risks and drought stresses, and struggle to balance human demands with environmental needs. In this conference we cast our net broadly, exploring several salient topics including: trans-boundary cooperation, water marketing, Indigenous water rights, environmental and social water needs, and drought coping. This public event will be informed by three invitation-only meetings held immediately before the conference: an “Indigenous Water Justice” symposium; a “Social Dimensions of Environmental Water Management” workshop; and a “Drought Crises in Federations” symposium

    Watershed Planning and Management in Colorado

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    9 pages. Introduction -- The watershed approach in Colorado -- Moving to the next level : implementation of the BIPs -- Possible next steps -- Conclusion.https://scholar.law.colorado.edu/books_reports_studies/1183/thumbnail.jp

    AGENDA: A Celebration of the Work of Charles Wilkinson: Served with Tasty Stories and Some Slices of Roast

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    Conference held at the University of Colorado, Wolf Law Building, Wittemyer Courtroom, Thursday, March 10th and Friday, March 11th, 2016. Conference moderators, panelists and speakers included University of Colorado Law School professors Phil Weiser, Sarah Krakoff, William Boyd, Kristen Carpenter, Britt Banks, Harold Bruff, Richard Collins, Carla Fredericks, Mark Squillace, and Charles Wilkinson We celebrate the work of Distinguished Professor Charles Wilkinson, a prolific and passionate writer, teacher, and advocate for the people and places of the West. Charles\u27s influence extends beyond place, yet his work has always originated in a deep love of and commitment to particular places. We honor Charles\u27s work in the same way he approached it, by starting with place and expanding to include the entire country. We will close by coming back home to Boulder, where we are fortunate to call Charles a friend, colleague, and mentor
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