802 research outputs found

    Effects of High Pressure and Sous-Vide Processing On Quality of Atlantic Sea Scallops (Placopecten Magellanicus)

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    Sous-vide is the cooking of vacuum-sealed foods at precise temperatures in a water bath. Vacuum packaging and cooking at lower temperatures offer multiple benefits to maintain the nutritive and sensory value of foods in comparison to traditional cooking methods. Sea scallops are high-value products that have a very short refrigerated shelf-life (\u3c7 \u3edays). High pressure processing (HPP) may facilitate the development of convenient-to-use, high quality, refrigerated scallop products for sous-vide applications to be sold in retail and foodservice facilities. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the effects of HPP and subsequent sous-vide cooking on the 1) physicochemical and sensory attributes, 2) refrigerated shelf-life, and 3) protein structural modifications of sea scallops. Sous-vide cooking scallops at 55 °C for 208 min, 60 °C for 45 min, or 65 °C for 10 min revealed that consumer acceptability did not differ significantly (

    Potential utilization of scallop viscera for solid waste management and as feedstuff for swine

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    Waste management has been identified as a major problem which will threaten the economic security of Florida's seafood industry within the next ten years (1). One of the primary concerns is treatment and disposal of solid wastes resulting from seafood processing. Utilization of scallop viscera as silage, much like that developed for waste fish and fish offal (3,4), could represent a practical solid waste treatment option which offers the additional benefit of a protein feed supplement for production of swine. (27pp.

    Analyzing The Potential Of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis In Identifying The Effects Of Freezing In Atlantic Sea Scallop Products (Placopecten Magellanicus)

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    The sensitivity of bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) was investigated to assess the potential of identifying the effects of freezing in market-ready Atlantic sea scallops (Placopecten magellanicus). Measurements of resistance (R) and reactance (Xc) were recorded using a Certified Quality Reader (CQR) (Certified Quality Food Inc., Clinton Township, MI 48035) BIA device at 50kHz. Prior to investigating the effects of freezing on BIA measurements a standard operating procedure (SOP) was established to limit sources of error. BIA measurements were used in establishing an SOP which focused upon the preparation of samples through blot drying, as well as, proper orientation of scallops in relation to BIA measurement tools. Once completed, the effects of freezing were investigated by comparing BIA measurements of samples when fresh and after two freezing cycles. Additionally, measurements were taken from samples that were previously frozen using individual quick freeze (IQF) as an additional source of frozen tissue. BIA measurements were capable of identifying the effects of freezing upon scallop tissue when subjected to freezing; therefore, BIA has the potential to be an accurate and precise tool in identifying previously frozen scallop products, which will allow scallop marketing companies to rapidly inform retailers as to the added value of their products

    An Investigation into the Scallop Parasite Outbreak on the Mid-Atlantic Shelf: Transmission Pathways, Spatio-Temporal Variation of Infection and Consequences to Marketability : Final Report

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    A disease epizootic has developed that threatens one of the most valuable fisheries in the US. The U.S. sea scallop (Placopecten magellanicus) fishery landed $512 million worth of scallop meats in 2017 (NMFS, 2018). This fishery is based on landings of scallop adductor muscles only, with the remainder of the scallop discarded at sea (NEFSC, 2018). During the spring of 2015 both industry and scientific assessment crews noted unprecedented numbers of a parasitic nematode in the adductor muscle of captured scallops (Figure 1). The presence of the parasite in the adductor muscle is expressed through macroscopic lesions, or cysts. These lesions are rust-brown to orange/brown in color with a typically elongated shape, ranging from 2 -12 mm in length and 1 - 4 mm in width. Nearly all lesions were observed along the exterior edge of the adductor muscle between the mantle velar folds of both valves opposite the catch muscle (sweet-meat). This location on the adductor muscle is anatomically adjacent to the kidney-adductor muscle attachment site and opposite of scallop intestine and anus. Infected scallops were observed in the southern portion of the stock and corresponded with the re-opening of three spatial management areas in this region. The wide distribution of the observed parasite is of concern from a product marketability standpoint and may represent the early stages of an expansion of parasite prevalence and intensity. Preliminary investigations suggest that the nematode observed is Sulcasaris sulcata (Rudders and Roman, 2018a)

    Evaluation of sea scallop dredge ring size : contract report submitted to NOAA, National Marine Fisheries Service

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    1. A Report to the Sea Scallop Plan Development Team: Preliminary Assessment of a 3.25 Inch Hing Dredge Virginia Marine Hesource Report No. 94-1 February, 1994 ........p 11 2. Harvesting Efficiency and Size Selectivity of 3.25 and 3.50 Inch Ring Sea Scallop Dredges, Preliminary Cruise Report U.S. Department of State, Washington, D.C. September, 1994 .......p 25 3. Harvest Efficiency and Size Selectivity of 3.0 and 3.25 Inch Sea Scallop Dredge Rings Virginia Marine Resource Report No. 94-5 July, 1994 .......p 29 4. Harvest Efficiency and Size Selectivity of 3.25 and 3.50 Inch Ring Sea Scallop Dredges Final Cruise Heport U.S. Department of State, Washington, D.C. January, 1995 ......p 36 5. Comparative Efficiency and Selectivity of 3.25 and 3.50 Inch Ring Scallop Dredges Preliminary Data Report May, 1995 ........p 67 6. Compartive Efficiency nd Selectivty of 3.25 and 3.50 inch Ring Scallop Dredges Virginia Marine Resource Report No. 95-6 .........p124 7. Bycatch in the United States and Canadian Sea Scallop Fishery September, 1995....p163 8. Quarterly Progress Reports May, 1993 to June, 1995 ............p 18

    Quality assessment of weathervane scallop (Patinopecten caurinus) and purple-hinge rock scallop (Crassadoma gigantea) from Alaska

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    Thesis (M.S.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2011In Alaska, the Pacific weathervane scallop (Patinopecten caurinus) is the only species commercially harvested. In the Eastern Gulf of Alaska, harvesters report occurrences of poor quality and difficult to market scallops from some fishing areas, designating the product 'weak meat' scallops. The purple-hinge rock scallop (PHRS, Crassadoma gigantea), has aquaculture potential. A recent grow-out study in Alaska was promising, verifying this potential. Our goal was to assess the quality of Alaskan scallops using physical and chemical analyses to understand the perceived differences in meat quality. 'Weak meat' (WS) and standard quality (SS) whole weathervane scallops from Yakutat, two batches of scallop muscle from Kodiak (KS1, KS2) and a group of whole PHRS from Southeast Alaska were sampled. Compared to KS1, KS2 and SS, muscle condition was lower (P0.05) in proximate composition between PHRS and Kodiak scallops, however, PHRS had higher (P<0.05) levels of [omega]-6 fatty acids. Results confirmed anecdotal information from harvesters that WS was inferior in quality when compared to either SS or KS. Furthermore, we concluded that PHRS meat was of high quality, similar to Kodiak scallops.Matt Myers’ Travel Award Scholarship1. General introduction -- 2. Quality assessment of weathervane scallops (Patinopecten caurinus) from Alaska -- 3. Quality assessment of purple hinge scallops (Crassadoma gigantea) from Alaska -- 4. General conclusions -- Appendices

    Nutritional value and fatty acid profile of two wild edible limpets from the Madeira Archipelago

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    Patella aspera and Patella candei are two abundant limpet species commercially exploited and often used as a delicacy in the Madeira Archipelago, but there is a lack of scientific knowledge about these species. This study investigated the nutritional value and fatty acids of this species across the coast of Madeira Archipelago. The lipid content (7.71–12.60% dw), proteins (48.22–64.09% dw), ashes (11.12–23.12% dw) and carbohydrates (4.5–10.9% dw) were determined in P. aspera and P. candei at different collection sites. In the fatty acid composition, a total of 23 fatty acids (FAs) were identified. P. aspera showed the highest amount of monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs, 35.02%) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 12.59%), and P. candei presented the highest level of oleic acid (OA, 28.25%), polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs, 27.26%) and arachidonic acid (AA, 11.38%). The Σω3/Σω6 dietary ratio presented levels>0.25 suggesting that these marine molluscs are a good source of ω3 for dietary intake. Within each specie significant differences (p<0.05) across sites were observed. High amounts of essential nutrients were shown in Patella species collected at Selvagens site while poorest levels were shown in Patella collected at Lido. The evaluation of the nutritional traits of P. candei and P. aspera shows that these limpets are good sources of essential fatty acids for human health and that the distribution of limpets is a key factor when determining its dietary value.info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersio
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