101,518 research outputs found

    Information technologies: science, engineering, technology, education, health. Part 3

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    Подано тези доповідей науково-практичної конференції MicroCAD-2018 за теоретичними та практичними результатами наукових досліджень і розробок, які виконані викладачами вищої школи, науковими співробітниками, аспірантами, студентами, фахівцями різних організацій і підприємств. Для викладачів, наукових працівників, аспірантів, студентів, фахівців. Тези доповідей відтворені з авторських оригіналів

    First Records of the Adventive Pseudoanthidium nanum (Mocsáry) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) in Illinois and Minnesota, with Notes on its Identification and Taxonomy

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    We report the first records of Pseudoanthidium nanum (Mocsáry) in Illinois and Minnesota in 2016 and 2018, respectively. This represents a relatively rapid expansion since P. nanum was first detected in New Jersey in 2008. In order to help monitor the spread of this bee, we provide information on how to identify P. nanum and provide images of the general habitus, diagnostic features, and male genitalia. Finally, we confirm the taxonomic identity of P. nanum in the United States and highlight potential impacts on native anthidiines

    TGLE Vol. 51 nos. 1 & 2 full issue

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    Full issue for TGLE Vol. 51 Nos. 1 &

    Pentatomidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) Captured on Purple Prism Traps Deployed for Detection of Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Minnesota

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    The observation of bycatch from insect trapping programs, though often considered bothersome, may hold value for ecological and taxonomic studies. In Minnesota, a large trapping survey consisting of pheromone-baited purple prism traps, has been conducted for early detection of Agrilus planipennis, the emerald ash borer. Stink bugs (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), which are pests of increasing importance in the North Central U.S., were observed to be captured by these traps. The objective of this study was to use trap bycatch from the A. planipennis traps for further documentation of the abundance and diversity of Pentatomidae in Minnesota. In 2011 and 2012, 4,401 and 5,651 purple prism traps were deployed and checked in Minnesota, respectively. Across both years, a total of 17 species of Pentatomidae were identified from 2 subfamilies, Asopinae and Pentatominae. The most abundant and prevalent species collected were Banasa calva (Say), B. dimidiata (Say), Chinavia hilaris (Say), Euschistus tristigmus luridus Dallas, Menecles insertus (Say), and Podisus maculiventris (Say). The pentatomid community observed on purple prism traps deployed in arboreal habitats differed from pentatomid communities reported in Minnesota crops (i.e., soybean, wheat and corn). Results of this study show that many pentatomid species are captured on purple prism traps and therefore bycatch of these traps could provide valuable information on the pentatomid community. However, purple prism traps should be used in addition to traditional surveillance or scouting methods for pentatomids

    Panel Discussion - Management of Eurasian watermilfoil in the United States using native insects: State regulatory and management issues

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    While researchers have evaluated the potential of native insect herbivores to manage nonindigenous aquatic plant species such as Eurasian watermilfoil ( Myriophyllum spicatum L.), the practical matters of regulatory compliance and implementation have been neglected. A panel of aquatic nuisance species program managers from three state natural resource management agencies (Minnesota, Vermont and Washington) discussed their regulatory and policy concerns. In addition, one ecological consultant attempting to market one of the native insects to manage Eurasian watermilfoil added his perspective on the special challenges of distributing a native biological control agent for management of Eurasian watermilfoil

    Historical Population Increases and Related Inciting Factors of Agrilus anxius, Agrilus bilineatus, and Agrilus granulatus liragus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in the Lake States (Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin)

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    Three native species of tree-infesting Agrilus have regularly reached outbreak levels in the Lake States (Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin), including A. anxius Gory (bronze birch borer), A. bilineatus (Weber) (twolined chestnut borer), and A. granulatus liragus Barter & Brown (bronze poplar borer). The main host trees for these Agrilus are species of Betula for A. anxius, Castanea and Quercus for A. bilineatus, and Populus for A. granulatus liragus. Based on 197 annual forest health reports for Michigan (1950–2017, 66 years), Minnesota (1950–2017, 64 years), and Wisconsin (1951–2017, 67 years), A. bilineatus was the most often reported Agrilus species in all three states (mentioned in 90 annual reports), with A. anxius second (71 reports) and A. granulatus liragus third (21 reports). Drought was the most commonly reported inciting factor for outbreaks of all three Agrilus species, with defoliation events ranking second. The top two defoliators reported as inciting outbreaks of each species were, in decreasing order, Fenusa pumila Leach (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae; birch leafminer) tied with Malacosoma disstria Hübner (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae; forest tent caterpillar) for A. anxius; M. disstria and Alsophila pometaria (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae; fall cankerworm) for A. bilineatus; and M. disstria and Choristoneura conflictana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae; large aspen tortrix) for A. granulatus liragus. Other environmental factors occasionally listed as inciting Agrilus outbreaks included late spring frosts, ice storms, and strong wind events

    TGLE Vol. 52 Nos. 1 & 2 Full Issue

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    Full issue for TGLE Vol. 52 Nos. 1 &

    Lessons learned: rearing the crown-boring weevil, Ceutorhynchus scrobicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in containment for biological control of garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata)

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    In this paper, we describe lessons learned and protocols developed after a decade of rearing Ceutorhynchus scrobicollis Nerenscheimer and Wagner in a Biosafety Level 2 containment facility. We have developed these protocols in anticipation of approval to release C. scrobicollis in North America for the biocontrol of garlic mustard. The rearing protocol tried to minimize the potential of attack by the adult parasitoid, Perilitus conseutor, which may be present in field collected C. scrobicollis from Europe to prevent inadvertent introduction of parasitoids into North America. All C. scrobicollis used for our quarantine rearing were field collected near Berlin, Germany. We have successfully reared C. scrobicollis on caged garlic mustard plants in a growth chamber by alternating temperatures and photoperiods to simulate those in its native range. In Germany, C. scrobicollis produces one generation per year and F1 adults emerge in late May. In containment, a new generation of adults emerged an average of 108 days after adults were placed on plants. We found the optimal time spent to collect F1 adults was four weeks after the appearance of the first F1 adult, with 95% of potential adults collected. Simulating a three-month summer aestivation period, followed by a week of fall, and three weeks of winter conditions resulted in optimum levels of oviposition in F1 females. Larvae first hatched 8- to-10 days after adults were placed on plants at 15/14 C day/night temperatures with a 9.5 hour photoperiod. We therefore recommend that C. scrobicollis adults are removed from garlic mustard rosettes after 8 days. This will maximize the period of female oviposition while minimizing the time when larvae are available for attack from P. conseutor

    US Economic Competitiveness At Risk: A Midwest Call to Action on Immigration Reform

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    For too long the Midwest has waited for Washington to produce meaningful reform of the nation's immigration laws. Bills have come and gone through the years, but often end in political gridlock. The Midwestern economy needs high-skilled, educated workers with long-term visas to create the companies and innovations that will power it in the future. Midwestern businesses need low-skilled immigrants with visas to sustain their industries. Midwestern schools insist that their students get the legal status that will lead to higher education and jobs. Midwestern farms seek a legal way to hire the seasonal help they need. Throughout the Midwest, cities and towns cope imaginatively with the social and economic challenges of immigration. Yet there is only so much the region can do until the federal government acts.That time has come. As economic recovery proceeds and political alignments shift, our region's leaders are thinking strategically about long-term economic competitiveness and the role played by immigrants at all levels. Midwest leaders want to ensure sustainable growth, jobs, population stability, and quality of life. Immigrants are an essential ingredient for this future. America's heartland can wait no longer.A diverse and bipartisan group of civic and business leaders, aware of the urgency of immigration reform and frustrated with delays, began convening in December 2011 to produce this report. Their priority was to state what the region needs from immigration reform to ensure its economic competitiveness. If 53 Republican and Democratic leaders -- drawn from companies, law enforcement, schools, hospitals, nonprofits, foundations, advocacy groups, and communities of faith -- from the 12-state Midwest can support these recommendations, then surely our representatives in Washington can act on them

    Misc. Pub. 88-1

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    I submit herewith the annual report of the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, for the period ending December 31, 1987. This is done in accordance with an act of the Congress, approved March 2, 1887, entitled "An act to establish Agricultural Experiment Stations, in connection with the Agricultural Colleges established in the several states under the provisions of an act approved July 2,1862, and under the acts supplementary thereto," and also of the act of the Alaska Territorial Legislature, approved March 12,1935, accepting the provisions of the act of Congress. James V. Drew, DirectorStatement of Purpose -- Plant and Animal Sciences -- Forest Sciences -- Resources Management -- Publications -- Financial Statement -- Staf
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