90 research outputs found

    Herding cats: observing live coding in the wild

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    After a momentous decade of live coding activities, this paper seeks to explore the practice with the aim of situating it in the history of contemporary arts and music. The article introduces several key points of investigation in live coding research and discusses some examples of how live coding practitioners engage with these points in their system design and performances. In the light of the extremely diverse manifestations of live coding activities, the problem of defining the practice is discussed, and the question raised whether live coding will actually be necessary as an independent category

    The Future of Software Copyright Protection: Arbitration v. Litigation

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    The legal profession and computer industry have expressed dissatisfaction with the existing copyright protection provided computer software and its traditional means of enforcement by litigation. These criticisms are exemplified in the protracted NEC Corp. v. Intel Corp. litigation. After examination of the current copyright laws and the recent NEC/Intel decision, the author analyzes the IBM/Fujitsu settlement, which created a new hybrid form of commercial arbitration. By relinquishing extensive control over their businesses to the arbitrators, IBM and Fujitsu established a sophisticated mechanism to resolve future conflicts and forestall future litigation. The author concludes that this hybrid method of arbitration is a viable and realistic alternative for the resolution of complex computer copyright disputes

    Conceptual Computing and Digital Writing

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    In 1952 computer scientist Christopher Strachey wrote a parodical love letter generator. This system, the prototype of all computational conceptual writing – the almost completely secret prototype – was up and running not only before conceptual writing was formulated but even before conceptual art had arrived. The program predates the earliest work that is consistently identified as part of the (yet unnamed) conceptual art movement, Rauschenberg’s Erased De Kooning Drawing. It was not created by someone who identified or was identified as a writer, or as an artist, and it seems to have been seen as more the server-room equivalent of a parlor game than as a part of the tradition of literary arts. Only recently have programmers and scholars provided versions of the generator that appear in an installation and Web contexts and discussed in depth the literary aspects of the system. All of this makes Strachey’s program not only the first in its category but also quite typical of the scattered, marginal, often overlooked projects that have explored the computer’s ability to write conceptually over the last sixty years

    The Council Directive on the Legal Protection of Computer Programs: An Unsatisfactory Balance of Competing Interests

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