896 research outputs found

    INNOVATION PROCESS FOR HALAL PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT: AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF ITALIAN FIRMS

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    The Halal global market is promising a rapid and sustained growth (Berry 2008; Sungkar et al., 2008). In fact, only for Halal food industry, the amount of international trade has exceeded 2.1 trillion USD in 2006 (Berry 2008; Riaz and Chaudry 2004). The reasons of the prompt growing are multiple, but mainly due to (1) the rapid spread of the Islamic faithful worldwide, (2) the increasing spending power of the Islamic people. Despite the importance this market has on the global scene, few studies are available, discussing in-depth the phenomenon from the managerial and innovation management perspectives. Inspired by this opportunity, we attempt to explore in depth the innovation process leading companies from Haram to Halal products in the food industry. A multiple case study of four Italian companies has been developed in order to explore their innovation process and to understand how it has been reviewed to fit the Islamic requirements. The specific product and process solutions adopted by the companies have been analyzed as well as the related managerial and organizational implications and innovation changes implemented. In Italy, so far, only few isolated initiatives shed a first light on the Halal theme and the landscape appears very embryonic.Halal, Islam, New Product Development.

    Productive Development Policies in Trinidad and Tobago: A Critical Review

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    Even as Trinidad and Tobago seeks productive diversification away from the energy sector, the process underlying the country’s productive development policies (PDP) is in a state of transition from state-directed industrial policy to a newer approach with extensive private-public participation. This study explores the main characteristics of four PDPs in Trinidad and Tobago and reviews them following the related literature (e.g., Rodríguez-Clare, 2005a and 2005b, and Melo and Rodríguez-Clare, 2006). The four PDPs are: a) The process towards the Promotion of Clusters; b) the PDPs for the Tourism industry; c) the classical PDPs for Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises and; d) the Free Trade Zone as a policy designed to compensate for the failure of the State.Industrial policy, Productive development policies, Diversification, Caribbean, Trinidad and Tobago

    Journal of Food Law & Policy - Volume 14 Fall 2018

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    Manufacturer, Supermarket, and Grocer Liability for Contaminated Food and Beverages due to Negligence, Warranty, and Liability Laws

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    Foodborne illnesses linked to Salmonella, Norovirus, Listeria, and Escherichia coli (E. Coli) are a serious problem people all over the world as they tend to negatively impact about ten to fifteen percent of every population. In this article, we focus on who is legally responsible for the proper handling of foods and the legal redress harmed consumers have in recovering damages. This article examines three legal doctrines that the injured consumer can use to sue parties on the food chain – the common law tort of negligence, warranty law based on statutory law – the Uniform Commercial Code, and the common law tort of strict liability. The article provides a legal overview of the three legal doctrines wherein basic principles and elements are set forth and illustrated, while examining them in the context of recent food and beverage case law involving manufacturers, supermarkets, and grocers. Based on the legal analysis, the knowledge and experience of the authors, as well as insights gained from legal and management commentary, the authors discuss the implications of food and beverage liability for employers and managers in the food chain. Finally, we provide recommendations to employers and managers on how to properly handle safety standards in order to avoid liability for foodborne illnesses and accidents

    Potential Industry Possibilities for South Dakota Indian Reservations

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    Research studies covering manufacturing growth in more than 245 non-metropolitan communities (ones with less than 50.000 population) across the U.S. indicate that new industries may generate employment and earnings in communities where the industries are located, but net fiscal gains to local governments and school districts may be more modest. And, in some cases, elements of the local public sector may incur cost increases exceeding tax and other revenue increases. Dobbs felt that communities should not be discouraged by these findings. Instead they should invest some time and effort in examining two questions. The first question pertains to the examination of the type of industry to be pursued. The second question involves examining how potential new firms are likely to benefit or impose costs on public and private segments of their particular, local economies. The geographic area of study was limited to Pine Ridge and Rosebud Indian Reservations. The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation consists of Shannon and Washabaugh Counties, while Rosebud Indian Reservation consists only of Todd County. The selection of Pine Ridge and Rosebud Indian reservations as the study area was based on population considerations. In 1979 more than half of South Dakota’s Indian population (59.3 percent) resided in those areas. Realizing that the reservation counties (Shannon, Washabaugh, and Todd) cannot and should not be totally isolated from the surrounding areas, four adjacent counties (Bennett, Mellette, Tripp and Gregory) with relatively large Indian populations were also included. Therefore, the total study area included seven counties. The objective of the research was to specify and demonstrate the use of a planning methodology for identifying the types of rural industries that might both be feasible and generate significant employment and personal income on South Dakota Indian Reservations. The methodology is used to develop rural industrialization strategies but will stop short of specific feasibility analyses
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