1,927 research outputs found

    Ensuring a sustainable supply of pharmacy graduates : proposals for consultation (first stage)

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    A comparison study of perceived stress and quality of life among Master of Pharmacy and non-pharmacy master's students

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    Background: Postgraduate students often live with an excessive amount of stress, which can have negative academic, emotional and health-related outcomes.Aim: To examine perceived stress and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among Master of Pharmacy (MPharm) students compared to non-pharmacy master's students (Non-MPharm). Method: The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), SF-12v2 survey and a questionnaire instruments were used to measure stress, HRQOL and factors that MPharm students believed produced and alleviated stress, respectively. Results: One hundred percent of MPharm students (n=26) and 88% of Non-MPharm students (n=100) participated in this study. The mean PSS scores were insignificantly different between the MPharm students and Non-MPharm students. Negative correlations were found between stress and mental and physical HRQOL in MPharm students. However, only negative correlation between stress and mental HRQOL in Non-MPharm students. Conclusion: MPharm students reported relatively lower levels of stress and mental HRQOL than Non-MPharm students did

    A framework model for a contextualized and integrated warfarin therapy case in a master of pharmacy program

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    © Copyright 2019 American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.Objective. To develop and integrate a case study on warfarin into a clinical pharmacy workshop. Methods. A framework model was designed and used to create a case study on warfarin therapy. The case study was implemented in a third-year Master of Pharmacy course. Student feedback was obtained using an online questionnaire and two focus groups. Results. All students agreed that the case study successfully integrated the science of warfarin and concepts of pharmacy practice. The majority of students (94%) agreed that this approach helped them to understand the science of warfarin more than a traditional lecture would have. Students felt the time allocated to the workshop was too short. Conclusion. An integrated case study provides a learning environment that emphasizes the contextualization of chemistry and pharmacology into a clinical pharmacy setting.Peer reviewedFinal Published versio

    Community pharmacy as an effective teaching and learning environment: Student perspectives from a UK MPharm programme

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    Introduction: In order to increase new pharmacists' preparedness for clinical practice, pharmacy education in the United Kingdom (UK) is moving towards a five-year integrated degree incorporating the pre-registration year into the undergraduate programme. The purpose of this research is to explore masters of pharmacy (MPharm) student attitudes towards experiential learning and assess community pharmacy as a teaching and learning environment. Methods: MPharm students (n=857) at one UK pharmacy school were invited to complete an online questionnaire. Responses were statistically analysed while open comments were thematically analysed. Results: Students were positive about placement organisation, with over 80% agreeing the pharmacist and support staff were enthusiastic and well-prepared. However, 62% of respondents felt they were unable to interact with patients on placements and instead spent time completing pre-determined learning tasks. Seventy-seven percent felt these tasks limited real “hands-on” experiences. Although 78% of respondents believed placements provided a valuable learning experience, only 18% thought placements prepared them for post-graduate employment. Conclusions: Community pharmacy environments are often busy and unpredictable, and experiential learning should be designed to allow better exposure to clinical practice with less predefined learning. Placements should allow for more collaborative working between universities and employers and incorporate the use of learning standards. This would represent a move towards a five-year integrated degree and a better understanding of the associated challenges involved

    School of Pharmacy

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    Pharmacy Student's perceptions of Natural Science and Mathematics Subjects

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    Objective. To determine the level of importance pharmacy students placed on science and mathematics subjects for pursuing a career in pharmacy. Method. Two hundred fifty-four students completed a survey instrument developed to investigate students’ perceptions of the relevance of science and mathematics subjects to a career in pharmacy. Pharmacy students in all 4 years of a master of pharmacy (MPharm) degree program were invited to complete the survey instrument. Results. Students viewed chemistry-based and biology-based subjects as relevant to a pharmacy career, whereas mathematics subjects such as physics, logarithms, statistics, and algebra were not viewed important to a career in pharmacy. Conclusion. Students’ experience in pharmacy and year of study influenced their perceptions of subjects relevant to a pharmacy career. Pharmacy educators need to consider how they can help students recognize the importance of scientific knowledge earlier in the pharmacy curriculum

    Qualitative evaluation of a practice-based experience pilot program for master of pharmacy students in Scotland

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    Objective. To determine the views of pharmacists in central Scotland regarding experiential education for MPharm students. Methods. A thematic analysis was completed by Ms. Gillian Hendry and Dr. Sally Wiggins of interviews conducted with ten practicing pharmacists paired with first-year master of pharmacy (MPharm) students during the 2011-2012 academic year. Relevant comments from the interviews were manually sorted in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet to bring similarly themed material together to facilitate the identification and naming of recurring themes and subthemes. Results. The pharmacists were unanimous in their opinion that experiential education was valuable for MPharm students and, in particular, that it helped students to develop self-confidence. The pharmacists derived personal satisfaction in developing mentor/mentee relationships with students. They also recognized the value that students provided to the workforce as well as the educational value to themselves in supervising students. The participants’ primary dissatisfaction was that the pharmacy workflow limited the time they could spend mentoring students. Conclusion. The results provide guidance to the academic community and the pharmacy practice community in the United Kingdom (UK) regarding the design and integration of experiential education courses in MPharm degree programs
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