110 research outputs found

    Subject Benchmark Statement: Sociology: Draft for consultation, January 2016

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    Minority Banks in New York City: Is the Community Reinvestment Act Relevant?

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    Minority Banks in New York City: Is the Community Reinvestment Act Relevant?

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    Subject Benchmark Statement: geography

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    Subject benchmark statement : geography : draft for consultation

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    Lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus) used as cleaner fish: Characterization and suitability for human consumption

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    Farmed lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus) is frequently used as cleaner fish in Norwegian salmon aquaculture. During the period in the net cage, the lumpfish feed on salmon lice. After a time, the fish stop eating the lice and are then withdrawn from the net cage without further exploitation. In this study, the nutritional value of lumpfish was characterized to assess its suitability as a human food. The lumpfish were collected from two separate salmon aquaculture facilities and analyzed for proximate composition, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, environmental pollutants, and heavy metals. The water and protein content were approximately 90 and 6%, respectively. The protein contained all essential amino acids. The fat content ranged from 0.9 to 3.7% with a high level of the long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid; 20:5n-3) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid; 22:6n-3). Lumpfish may be a good source of B12 and D3 vitamins, however, the content of several minerals was low. The environmental pollutants and heavy metals were below the EU maximum levels, making the lumpfish safe for human consumption. Overall, our results indicate a potential to exploit the lumpfish, even after its time as a cleaner fish.publishedVersio

    Improving the Reporting of Primary Care Research: An International Survey of Researchers

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    PURPOSE: To assess opportunities to improve reporting of primary care (PC) research to better meet the needs of its varied users. METHODS: International, interprofessional online survey of PC researchers and users, 2018 to 2019. Respondents used Likert scales to rate frequency of difficulties in interpreting, synthesizing, and applying PC research reports. Free-text short answers were categorized by template analysis to record experiences, concerns, and suggestions. Areas of need were checked across existing reporting guidelines. RESULTS: Survey yielded 255 respondents across 24 nations, including 138 women (54.1%), 169 physicians (60%), 32 scientists (11%), 20 educators (7%), and 18 public health professionals (6%). Overall, 37.4% indicated difficulties using PC research reports "50% or more of the time." The most common problems were synthesizing findings (58%) and assessing generalizability (42%). Difficulty was reported by 49% for qualitative, 46% for mixed methods, and 38% for observational research. Most users wanted richer reporting of theoretical foundation (53.7%); teams, roles, and organization of care (53.4%); and patient involvement in the research process (52.7%). Few reported difficulties with ethics or disclosure of funding or conflicts. Free-text answers described special challenges in reporting PC research: context of clinical care and setting; practical details of interventions; patient-clinician and team relationships; and generalizability, applicability and impact in the great variety of PC settings. Cross-check showed that few current reporting guidelines focus on these needs. CONCLUSIONS: Opportunities exist to improve the reporting of PC research to make it more useful for its many users, suggesting a role for a PC research reporting guideline

    Involuntary childlessness: an interpretative phenomenological analysis of black women’s experiences in Luton

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    A thesis submitted to the University of Bedfordshire, in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of Master of Philosophy (MPhil).This study aimed to explore the perception and experiences of involuntary childlessness among Black African women in the UK. While there are several studies in the area of infertility, they have usually been focused on national surveys of infertility prevalence and psychological-related stress treatment from a sample selected from White and middle-class women; in addition to a growing literature on the experiences of involuntary childlessness or infertility in developing countries. However, there is a lack of research exploring the impact that ethnicity and culture could have on the perception and experience of infertility within Western societies. An interpretative phenomenological perspective informed by the philosophical principles of Martin Heidegger (1927–1962) was used to explore the experiences of eight involuntarily childless Black African women in the UK. Semi-structured interviews were used in collecting data, and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Three superordinate themes emerged from the data analysis: ‘the vulnerable self’, ‘self and the social world’ and ‘coping with involuntary childlessness’ – revealing the complexities of the women’s experiences. The superordinate themes reflected a common experience shared by the women. The study revealed a concern about disclosure and exposure of their state of involuntary childlessness and the social judgement and stigma that comes with it; revealing the significant role that the community beliefs and perceptions play in the lives of the involuntarily childless women. The interviews also reveal that the experience of involuntary childlessness or infertility is one that gives rise to emotional pain, grief, loss of self-esteem, isolation and even discrimination. It is believed that the insights that this study provides will contribute to the empirical studies that have used IPA, as well as provide useful insights for infertility services in Luton as a way of ensuring that services meet the needs of the growing Black and minority ethnic population
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