1,834,438 research outputs found

    Organizational knowledge creation

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    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the state-ofthe- art in organizational knowledge creation, a field of research that is expanding almost exponentially. Knowledge creation is a dynamic capability that enables firms to achieve a sustainable competitive advantage on the market. Our purpose is to critically analyze the most significant ideas published in this field, and especially to present the most important models elaborated for organizational knowledge creation: Nonaka’s model, Nissen’s model, Boisot’s model, and the EO_SECI model. Also, we would like to identify the main determinants of the knowledge creation process.Ba, competitive advantage, knowledge, knowledge creation, SECI.

    Knowledge Creation / Conversion Process

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    Capturing and / or creating knowledge is a central part of the implementation of knowledge management and is the first stage of the cycle knowledge management. There are several approaches, techniques and tools that can be used to "extract" explicit knowledge to create new ones and to organize all knowledge in a systematic manner. Translation of knowledge into a form explicit or understandable called encoding, facilitates other knowledge management processes, such as storage or dissemination of knowledge. Multidisciplinary nature of knowledge management is highlighted by the fact that techniques used to capture knowledge from several fields such as sociology, economics, mathematical analysis etc.knowledge; model; conversion; creation.

    Communities, Knowledge Creation, and Information Diffusion

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    In this paper, we examine how patterns of scientific collaboration contribute to knowledge creation. Recent studies have shown that scientists can benefit from their position within collaborative networks by being able to receive more information of better quality in a timely fashion, and by presiding over communication between collaborators. Here we focus on the tendency of scientists to cluster into tightly-knit communities, and discuss the implications of this tendency for scientific performance. We begin by reviewing a new method for finding communities, and we then assess its benefits in terms of computation time and accuracy. While communities often serve as a taxonomic scheme to map knowledge domains, they also affect how successfully scientists engage in the creation of new knowledge. By drawing on the longstanding debate on the relative benefits of social cohesion and brokerage, we discuss the conditions that facilitate collaborations among scientists within or across communities. We show that successful scientific production occurs within communities when scientists have cohesive collaborations with others from the same knowledge domain, and across communities when scientists intermediate among otherwise disconnected collaborators from different knowledge domains. We also discuss the implications of communities for information diffusion, and show how traditional epidemiological approaches need to be refined to take knowledge heterogeneity into account and preserve the system's ability to promote creative processes of novel recombinations of idea

    Knowledge creation

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    Culture and diversity in knowledge creation

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    Is the paradise of effortless communication the ideal environment for knowledge creation? Or, can the development of local culture in regions raise knowledge productivity compared to a single region with a unitary culture? In other words, can a real technological increase in the cost of collaboration and the cost of public knowledge flow between regions, resulting in cultural differentiation between regions, increase welfare? In our framework, a culture is a set of ideas held exclusively by residents of a location. In general in our model, the equilibrium path generates separate cultures in different regions. When we compare this to the situation where all workers are resident in one region, R & D workers become too homogeneous and there is only one culture. As a result, equilibrium productivity in the creation of new knowledge is lower relative to the situation when there are multiple cultures and workers are more diverse.knowledge creation; knowledge diversity; ideas and culture

    Culture and diversity in knowledge creation

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    Is the paradise of effortless communication the ideal environment for knowledge creation? Or, can the development of local culture in regions raise knowledge productivity compared to a single region with a unitary culture? In other words, can a real technological increase in the cost of collaboration and the cost of public knowledge flow between regions, resulting in cultural differentiation between regions, increase welfare? In our framework, a culture is a set of ideas held exclusively by residents of a location. In general in our model, the equilibrium path generates separate cultures in different regions. When we compare this to the situation where all workers are resident in one region, R & D workers become too homogeneous and there is only one culture. As a result, equilibrium productivity in the creation of new knowledge is lower relative to the situation when there are multiple cultures and workers are more diverse.knowledge creation; knowledge diversity; ideas and culture

    Knowledge creation and control in organizations

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    The incremental innovations that underly much of modern economic growth typically involve changes to one or more components of a complex product. This creates a tension. On the one hand, a principal would like an agent to contribute innovative components. On the other hand, ironing out incompatibilities between interdependent components can be a drain on the principal's energies. The principal can conserve her energies by tightly controlling the innovation process, but this may inadvertently stifle the agent's incentive to innovate. We show precisely how this tension betweencreating knowledge and controlling knowledge shapes organizational forms.The novel concepts introduced are illustrated with case studies of the flatpanel cathode ray tube industry and Boeing's recent location decisions.incremental innovation, incomplete contracts, imperfect substitutability, appropriability, control

    Culture and diversity in knowledge creation

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    Is the paradise of effortless communication the ideal environment for knowledge creation? Or, can the development of local culture in regions raise knowledge productivity compared to a single region with a unitary culture? In other words, can a real technological increase in the cost of collaboration and the cost of public knowledge flow between regions, resulting in cultural differentiation between regions, increase welfare? In our framework, a culture is a set of ideas held exclusively by residents of a location. In general in our model, the equilibrium path generates separate cultures in different regions. When we compare this to the situation where all workers are resident in one region, R & D workers become too homogeneous and there is only one culture. As a result, equilibrium productivity in the creation of new knowledge is lower relative to the situation when there are multiple cultures and workers are more diverse.knowledge creation; knowledge diversity; ideas and culture
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