1,718 research outputs found

    Making Connections: A Handbook for Effective Formal Mentoring Programs in Academia

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    This book, Making Connections: A Handbook for Effective Formal Mentoring Programs in Academia, makes a unique and needed contribution to the mentoring field as it focuses solely on mentoring in academia. This handbook is a collaborative institutional effort between Utah State University’s (USU) Empowering Teaching Open Access Book Series and the Mentoring Institute at the University of New Mexico (UNM). This book is available through (a) an e-book through Pressbooks, (b) a downloadable PDF version on USU’s Open Access Book Series website), and (c) a print version available for purchase on the USU Empower Teaching Open Access page, and on Amazon

    Prosecutorial Discretion: District Attorneys, Public Opinion,and the Localized Rule of Law

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    This dissertation addresses three fundamental questions regarding the politics of prosecutorial behavior. Specifically, it examines how the selectors of prosecutors influence prosecutorial decision-making under different selection methods, including electionbased systems and appointment-based systems. By using a political responsiveness framework and utilizing empirical strategies, including an experiment and the construction of prosecutor policy position data, this study offers novel insights into the subject. First, I find that voters care about prosecutors’ issue positions and rely on various cues to identify candidates whose policy positions align with their preferences, even in low-information elections. Second, elections show promise as a mechanism for holding elected prosecutors accountable, with a stronger connection between prosecutors and public preferences observed under high electoral pressure. Third, the governor’s selection effect shapes the policy alignment between prosecutors and political elites in appointment-based systems

    Financial Inclusion Gone Wrong: Securities and Cryptoassets Trading for Children

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    According to studies, money is a major source of anxiety for most Americans. In looking for ways to remedy the source of such anxiety, some believe that increasing children’s financial orientation could help lower their money-related anxiety levels as adults. Identifying this market as a business opportunity—and reassured by research that shows that by age six, children are already veteran consumers of mobile apps—financial technology (fintech), decentralized finance (DeFi), and even traditional financial entities have started offering services and products to children. These services and products include a broad array of financial-related products and services, from enabling children to earn money for doing their chores, to trading stocks and cryptoassets, and even to earning digital assets and currencies while playing video games. The potential of this new market’s clientele is valuable for two reasons. First, having more customers is always a good thing. Second, children will eventually mature into adult customers who presumably will continue using the services and products they like and are familiar with. And, although some legal challenges are associated with children—who are minors—entering financial-based online contracts, this business trend will continue to grow as it becomes socially acceptable to offer financial services to children. Society’s newly adopted paradigms for describing, understanding, and shaping children’s rights, domestic relationships, custodial status, and even digital purchasing power are all supportive of this trend. Moreover, fintech and DeFi apps and games can help teach children about the value of money, the importance of investing, and the risks involved in trading. Yet fintech and DeFi apps and games could also have a disruptive effect on children, both developmentally and behaviorally, similar to that of other consumed digital content. This disruptive effect should be a source of concern to anyone focused on investor and consumer protection, including regulatory agencies like the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) and Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), which have already expressed concerns over gamification and digital engagement practices. In light of “the financialization of everything,” this Article looks to both legal and ethical reasoning and behavioral economics tools to call for the search for effective financial literacy education for children to be replaced by a search for policies more conducive to good consumer and investor protection outcomes. These policies should guide lawmakers in regulating fintech and DeFi apps and games offered to children in light of the following considerations: (i) the addictiveness of digital gaming; (ii) how gamifying finance makes it feel less serious; (iii) the connection between gamification and gambling; (iv) how children’s financial choices are more susceptible to the influence of outside parties than are those of adults; (v) fintech and DeFi apps and games’ failure to teach children the importance of concepts such as debt, credit, and financial commitments; and (vi) the unrealistic burden on young parents, who are already struggling to constantly supervise their children’s online activities, to monitor their children’s online financial activities in our digital era

    Salutogenesis in health promoting settings: a synthesis across organizations, communities and environments

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    Applying salutogenesis in organisations

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    A mixed methods study of outcomes, experiences, and perceptions of through-knee and above-knee amputation

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    Through-knee amputation (TKA) has several theoretical physical advantages over above-knee amputation (AKA), yet AKA remains the preferred level of amputation by UK vascular surgeons when below-knee amputation (BKA) is not feasible. How clinician’s perceptions of TKA influence current UK clinical practice, and how people living with TKA experience life post amputation is not currently understood.This thesis aimed to explore the outcomes, experiences, and perceptions of TKA compared to AKA. The current qualitative evidence regarding lived experience post TKA and AKA was synthesised, and a quantitative retrospective analysis completed to compare surgical and rehabilitation outcomes. These studies showed promising outcomes for TKA from a small number of participants with TKA in the qualitative literature and dataset. Current UK practice was further explored in two studies: a descriptive, cross-sectional online survey, and a qualitative cross-sectional comparative interview study involving specialist healthcare clinicians. The similarities and differences of people living with TKA, and AKA were further explored using a qualitative cross-sectional comparative interview study.Evidence from this thesis suggests that people with TKA have potential advantages that can improve quality of life after amputation compared to people with AKA, however barriers to communication between healthcare clinicians including a compartmentalised approach to rehabilitation and surgery threaten the quality of patient care. More evidence and training, and better collaborative working along the amputation pathway is needed to ensure that TKA is being performed for patients who would benefit from it

    2009-2010 University of Memphis directory

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    University of Memphis student, faculty, and staff telephone directory for 2009-2010, a project of the Division of Communications, Public Relations and Marketing.https://digitalcommons.memphis.edu/speccoll-ua-pub-directories/1054/thumbnail.jp

    Extra: The History of America’s Girl Newsies

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    Between the last half of the nineteenth-century and the first part of the twentieth, America’s streets were filled with the cries of newsies. Among the din of those shouting out newspaper headlines were the high-pitched voices of the girl newsies, or newsgirls. While they existed, newsgirls contributed much to news labor, and were important to the discussions concerning childhood, child labor reform, and women’s changing roles. Newspapers and reformers of all types projected their own anxieties and ambitions onto the girls, using them as talking points to further their own agendas. The girls’ work was prized and exploited by newspapers. Many reformers used newsgirls as examples of what was wrong with child street labor, while proponents of newsgirls, including newspaper publishers, argued that the girls needed the work and were not harmed by news labor. At the same time, both women’s rights advocates and opponents saw the girls as the prototypical New Women. Newsgirls did not think of themselves as symbols of reform, or even as exploited children, however. They were simply young, working-class girls who needed money for food and shelter. While history has remembered the labor, contributions, and experiences of newsboys, newsgirls have been largely overlooked. This dissertation offers a corrective, placing the experiences and perceptions of newsgirls at the fore. Through the use of extensive primary source materials, including artifacts created by women and girls, this work argues that history’s “extra” newsies were in fact essential to news labor and creates an instructive frame through which to examine changing gender norms and social reform movements. Newsgirls stand at the intersection of gender, reform, and news labor histories, shouting out truths for those willing to listen. By engaging fully with their contributions to the news industry and with the perceptions of their work, this study of newsgirls adds depth and richness to the histories of gender, newswork, working-class girlhood, and child labor in America.Doctor of Philosoph

    The a-word: destigmatizing abortion in American culture.

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    This dissertation uses an interdisciplinary perspective and explores the topic of abortion through legal, medical, philosophical, and cultural perspectives, providing alternative ways to talk about abortion. In some states, especially since the overturning of Roe, abortion has become almost impossible to access, particularly in the South and Midwest. Abortion as a medical procedure is highly stigmatized and although it is a common procedure, it is taboo to discuss in American culture. Exploring how different media work to destigmatize abortion in the United States can lead to a deeper, more nuanced understanding of an overly politicized topic. The introduction is a brief overview of my activism within reproductive justice and the importance that activism has on this project. The first chapter of this dissertation highlights a number of legal rulings and explores how the language within those rulings allows for negative interpretations of abortion. It also discusses practical aspects to obtaining an abortion in America, demonstrating how legal rulings impact real-world access to abortion. The remaining three chapters focus on how different media incorporate and address the topic of abortion. In chapter two, I discuss abortion stigma and the importance of destigmatizing abortion in American culture. I then explore how social media is being used to destigmatize abortion, specifically through hashtag campaigns and Twitter activism such as #ShoutYourAbortion. Chapter three concentrates on a newer branch of medical humanities, graphic medicine, that uses comics and graphic novels as a way to discuss medical experiences. I focus on Abortion Eve (1973), Not Funny Haha (2015), and Comics for Choice (2018) as well as one public-facing comic to demonstrate how comics and graphic novels both provide information on abortion and also aid in destigmatizing the procedure by providing a more nuanced perspective. In chapter four, I explore how television, even fictionalized, can impact how individuals view abortion procedures and the importance of portraying more accurate representations of abortion. I use episodes from Jane the Virgin, Dear White People, Shrill, and Friday Night Lights to discuss how these episodes accurately portray abortion and ways that those fictionalized portrayals can be improved to better address abortion stigma
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