69 research outputs found

    The American Indian Agent, 1791-1861 Questioning the Literary and Cinematic Stereotype as well as Historical Narratives to find the real Indian Agent

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    The American Indian Agent is a known figure in the national drama. Originally defined by nineteenth century political opponents, settlers, frontier business interests, the American military, Indian policy reformers and even Indians, the Indian agent ranges from inept to cupidinous; cruel to inhuman. Western fiction writers, screenwriters and episodic television dramatists of the twentieth century took the agent’s tarnished reputation and created a stereotype stock character for Westerns emphasising all his malevolent attributes. The historical profession has largely perpetuated the cultural and literary perception of the Indian agent, until some historians began to identify individualized exceptions to agent perfidy. As examples of benevolent agents grew, the profession revised its analysis allowing that some agents assisted Indians while most remained obdurately delinquent.Most historical research on Indian agents has focused on the period from 1861–1888, the Civil War to the end of the Apache Wars. Large swaths of history remain lightly explored as the Indian agent existed from 1791–1908. This thesis examines the Indian agent in the early years of the Republic, from 1791–1861, interacting with Indians from New York to Puget Sound, from Georgia to New Mexico and the vast Great Plains in between. Crucially this thesis places the agent in the world of the Indian agency as well as the competing worlds of politics, business, religion, settlement, and government administration of which he was also a part.The results are surprising. Although there were a few criminals and several men overwhelmed by conditions, most agents of Jeffersonian, Jacksonian, and Antebellum America were honest, sincere public servants, many coming to favor the Indians and spending their own money, and in a few cases, their blood to aid Indian development and freedom.This conclusion runs counter to both popular and historical perceptions. It seems almost everyone has adopted the old Aristotelian idea of petitio principii or “begging the question”. The bad and inept Indian agent must be bad and inept. No longer. These are the real Indian agents of 1791–1861

    Indian place names of Kansas

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    Thesis (M.A.)--University of Kansas, English, 1929

    The Kansas Immigrants: A series of fifty-six articles on the ethnic heritage of Kansas

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    The radio broadcasts that accompany this book are available in the KU Libraries' collections: http://catalog.lib.ku.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?bbid=796665Many Kansans today are rediscovering their personal and ethnic heritage. In music, art, literature, oral history and genealogy, these individuals are seeking to understand how their heritage has helped shape their lives. The Kansas Immigrants provides glimpses into the experiences of many of the groups that have settled this state. Together, these articles present a comprehensive view of immigration to the state. The Kansas Immigrants addresses a number of issues: the efforts of immigrants to assimilate to the larger society while attempting to maintain their own ethnic identity, the occasional violence in the meeting of different cultures in formerly homogeneous communities, and the problem of understanding different family values and lifestyles from one culture to another. It also examines the difficulties in preserving ethnic heritage; the oppression, segregation, and exploitation of ethnic minorities; the contributions of ethnic groups to the arts and cuisine; and the role of the ethnic church or organization in nurturing its members.The first thirty articles in this series were prepared by KANU at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, with funds from the Kansas Committee for the Humanities. The final twenty-six articles in the Kansas Immigrants were prepared by the University of Kansas Division of Continuing Education and KANU radio with support from the Kansas Committee for the Humanities, National Public. Radio, and the National Endowment for the Humanities

    1899 – Eighteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology - 1896-97, Part 2, J. W. Powell, Charles C. Royce, Cyrus Thomas

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    Report to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution concerning the respective rights of European nations in the newly discovered territory, foreign policy toward the Indians, Colonial policy toward the Indians and United States policy toward the Indians. The report includes a Schedule of Treaties and Acts of Congress Authorizing Allotments of Land in Severalty and a Schedule of Land Cessions.https://digitalcommons.csumb.edu/hornbeck_ind_1/1001/thumbnail.jp

    Potawatomi Indians of the West :

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    The Kansas Immigrants II

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    The radio broadcasts that accompany this book are available in the KU Libraries' collections: http://catalog.lib.ku.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?bbid=796665The Kansas Immigrants II addresses a number of issues: the efforts of immigrants to assimilate to the larger society while attempting to maintain their own ethnic identity, the occasional violence in the meeting of different cultures in formerly homogeneous communities, and the problem of understanding different family values and lifestyles from one culture to another. It also examines the difficulties in preserving ethnic heritage; the oppression, segregation, and exploitation of ethnic minorities; the contributions of ethnic groups to the arts and cuisine; and the role of the ethnic church or organization in nurturing its members. The first series dealt with immigration to Kansas prior to 1920; the second-year programs dip back in time to pick up a few early topics but concentrate mainly on developments after 1920. Many of the programs feature representative individuals or ethnic communities, for example, Strawberry Hill, a Croatian neighborhood in Kansas City;· Lebanese families in Pittsburg and Wichita; Potawatomi in the Horton area; and Beersheba, a defunct Jewish colony in western Kansas. Many Kansans today are rediscovering their personal and ethnic heritage. In music, art, literature, oral history and genealogy, these individuals are seeking to understand how their heritage has helped shape their lives. This project provides glimpses into the experiences of many of the groups that have peopled this state. Together the fifty-six programs in the two-year series present a comprehensive view of immigration to Kansas

    1907 - Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs for 1907

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    Detailed report on the efforts by the US government to civilize, educate and provide moral training to the original inhabitants. This largely involved placing the Indians on reservations, teaching them agricultural and homebuilding skills, training them in proper dress and customs of the white man and providing opportunities for education. Addresses, in part, recent laws regarding Indians and need for coordination amongst governmental agencies.https://digitalcommons.csumb.edu/hornbeck_usa_2_e/1031/thumbnail.jp
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