8,879 research outputs found

    Rational and Coalition Models of Job Evaluation: Do More Powerful University Departments Have an Advantage?

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    Job evaluation research has, to date, focused on the individual as the unit of analysis. After approximately 50 years of study, evidence on the basic assumptions supporting job evaluation is still inconclusive. This study expands the research by employing organizational theory to the topic and studying job evaluation at the group level. Prior work on rational and coalition models of resource allocation is used to develop hypotheses that are tested with six years of job evaluation data from a university. The results support the coalition model and the conclusion that departmental power can affect job evaluation outcomes

    The Effects of Departmental and Positional Power on Job Evaluation Outcomes: A Dual-Level Analysis of Power and Resource Allocation

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    We replicate research from two separate power and resource allocation research streams to test whether job evaluation outcomes at a university are simultaneously susceptible to effects of power held at both the group (i.e., academic department) and individual (i.e., a job\u27s hierarchical position) levels. In doing so, we illustrate limitations of the dominant rational model of research in job evaluation and, more generally, how dual levels of analysis can illuminate the relationship between power and resource allocation. We then investigate whether departmental and positional power interact in the allocation of resources at both levels. Results from six years of job evaluation data indicate that job evaluation outcomes are highly susceptible to both departmental and positional power. Moreover, our results suggest that positional power moderated the effect of departmental power on group level job evaluation successes. Drawing on our dual-level analysis, we propose a new model of power, resource allocation, and the perpetuation of power

    Analysis Representation Related to the Activities Relative Values Evaluated Using the Method Job Evaluation through the Load

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    The results obtained on the relative values for their work evaluated by applying a new job evaluation methods are analyzed in this paper. The research aims to identify whether job evaluation methodology through the tasks ensures relevant data on the relative values of activities. Demonstrating the relevance of data obtained support the further step, namely the job evaluation, on the premise - that assessed the relative values for stations to be correct, it is necessary to advance the tasks to be effectively evaluated. Study is applied in three areas of activity of human resources, financial, production accounting and ointments. I used two samples of professionals (occupants of positions evaluated) and lay persons from different companies. Analyses show that the methodology for assessing the tasks get good results in evaluation activities as a result we can say that the relative values for the right job will be evaluated.evaluation method, job evaluation, tasks, company analysis, results.

    職務給制度の新しい展開 : 職務給制度・その4 (完)

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    Ⅰ.序 Ⅱ. 「同一労働・同一賃金の原則」の拡大と限界 (1) 「同一労働・同一賃金の原則」の拡大 (2) 「同一労働・同一賃金の原則」の限界 Ⅲ. 能力給の転化形態としての職務給 (1) 職務給としての能力給と個人給としての能力給 (2) 「同一労働・同一賃金の原則」による職務給と「同一労働力・同一賃金の原則」による個人給 Ⅳ. 我国の職務給制度における特徴 (1) 我国の職務給導入における独自性 (2) 我国の職務給制度における特徴 Ⅴ.

    Effects of Compensation Strategy on Job Pay Decisions

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    Previous research has revealed wide variations in pay for the same job, even within a single locality. To date, however, the sources of such pay differentials are not well understood. The present research investigates how compensation managers from a wide variety of organizations combine infonnation about current job pay rates, market rates, and job evaluation points to arrive at new pay rates for jobs. In addition, it examines the role of two pay strategy variables (pay leadership position and external versus internal orientation) in job pay decisions, controlling for differences in organizational demographic characteristics (e.g., size, industry). Results suggest that pay strategies affect assigned pay levels, with higher pay being assigned by managers from fmns with market-leading strategies and internal pay orientations. In addition, pay strategies appear to influence the relative weights attached to market survey versus job evaluation infonnation in pay-setting for jobs. Specifically, although market survey information consistently explained more variance in assigned pay than did job evaluation, this effect was more pronounced among managers from finns having an external orientation. Organizational demographics also affected assigned pay levels, but to a lesser extent than pay strategies

    Job Evaluation

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    Knowing the factors used in the annual performance evaluation of superintendents is foundational to building a more effective process. The accompanying graph, based on AAS~s decennial survey of the field, shows how superintendents rank seven response options about the conduct of their own assessments by school boards. Critics claim current evaluation practices are plagued by ambiguous purposes, unrealistic expectations, uneven and subjective processes, and invalid outcomes. The overall quality of superintendent evaluations suffers from the variation in the bases of assessments and the number and competence of the evaluators. The limited application of national standards (such as those published by AASA in 1993) and state superintendent association guidelines is especially disturbing because such documents should include essential and validated job requirements. Greater uniformity in evaluation criteria, within and across states, would be a step toward ensuring more purposeful and objective outcomes

    The Effects of Market Survey Rates, Job Evaluation and Job Gender on Job Pay

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    The present study investigates the effects of current pay, market surveys, job evaluation points, job gender, and rater sex on pay rates for jobs. 406 compensation administrators assigned new pay rates to nine jobs in one of two matched job sets: either all predominantly female, or all predominantly male. The two sets were matched on all quantitative data (current rate, market rate, and job evaluation points), but varied in terms of job titles and descriptions. Multiple analyses of variance and regression analyses were performed to determine whether job gender had a significant effect on assigned pay rates, holding other factors constant. Regardless of the analysis employed, no evidence of gender bias was found. Limitations and suggestions for future research are offered

    職務給制度の原則と本質的要素について : 職務給制度・その2

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    Ⅰ.序 Ⅱ.職務給の概念 Ⅲ.職務給制度の一般原則~同一労働同一賃金の原則~ (1) 労働力と労働 (2) 同一労働力同一賃金の原則 (3) 同一労働同一賃金の原則 Ⅳ.職務給制度の本質的要素~職務評価~ (1) 職務評価の本質 (2) 職務評価の目的と方法 (3) 職務評価の順序 (4) 職務分析と狭義の職務評価 V.結

    Job evaluation methods and factors that impact employee job reviews/audits, salary & job classifications

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    Organizations rely on job evaluation methods to address pay structures and compliance requirements. A continuous and effective job evaluation method should provide an organization with a level of performance to meet needs essential in obtaining qualified employees, equitable classifications and salaries, and retention of employees. Even though compensation professionals have access to job evaluation methods to implement job evaluation systems there are problems in continuous and effective job evaluation methodological systems. The present study was conducted to identify (a) job evaluation methods currently being used by compensation professionals within the East Tennessee region; (b) opinions concerning job evaluation methods as related to reviews/audits, job classifications, and salaries; (c) factors that should be considered when choosing job evaluation methods; and (d) how methods should be conducted. Compensation professionals from within the East Tennessee region were sent by e-mail a web-based survey questionnaire to obtain information relevant to this study. The data gathered allowed the researcher to identify whether job evaluation methods were effectively meeting today\u27s compensation professional\u27s human resource needs

    A study of the point-factor job evaluation process used in the Des Moines, Iowa Public School District

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    This research examines the point-factor job evaluation model used for the Des Moines Public School District\u27s (DMPSD) administrative job evaluation An independent consulting firm (i.e., job evaluation consultant) was hired to provide technical expertise and assistance for the administrative job evaluation. The DMPSD selected six administrators (five certificated and one noncertificated) to form the job evaluation committee (JEC) to perform the evaluations for certificated and noncertificated administrative jobs. This committee was trained in the job evaluation method by the consultant;A point-factor survey (PFC survey) and follow-up interviews with the JEC members were used to examine the five major components of the job evaluation model, which were: the position questionnaire; the training and practice sessions; the interviews; the role of the consultant; and the group work evaluation scoring. The PFC survey consisted of 37 questions, subcategorized into five sections (representing the five components) and a section for comments. The follow-up interviews of the JEC members were conducted individually to elicit further information from the PFC survey. The interviews were tape recorded and transcribed;The results from the survey and interviews were analyzed and suggestions were submitted for improving the model. (1) The selection of two administrative job evaluation committees (five certificated and five noncertificated administrators); and (2) In-depth interview training for the JEC members by the consultant. Implications of these changes are: (1) Separating one job evaluation committee (with both certificated and noncertificated administrators) into two separate committees to give each group equality and autonomy. (2) In-depth interview training for the JEC members to provide them skills needed to elicit significant information from the interviewees for the job evaluation scoring. Other changes suggested were: (1) A large meeting for all DMPSD administrators with a sponsor presiding to discuss the job evaluation process and end results. (2) Group interviews (all the JEC members with each administrator). (3) Locations moved for interviews and evaluation scoring. (4) Use of audio-visuals to streamline the job evaluation process
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