165,797 research outputs found

    Information Fluency

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    Partnerships for information fluency

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    Using faculty-librarian partnerships to ensure that students become information fluent in the 21st century In the 21st century educators in partnership with librarians must prepare students effectively for productive use of information especially in higher education. Students will need to graduate from universities with appropriate information and technology skills to enable them to become productive citizens in the workplace and in society. Technology is having a major impact on society; in economics e-business is moving to the forefront; in communication e-mail, the Internet and cellular telephones have reformed how people communicate; in the work environment computers and web utilizations are emphasized and in education virtual learning and teaching are becoming more important. These few examples indicate how the 21st century information environment requires future members of the workforce to be information fluent so they will have the ability to locate information efficiently, evaluate information for specific needs, organize information to address issues, apply information skillfully to solve problems, use information to communicate effectively, and use information responsibly to ensure a productive work environment. Individuals can achieve information fluency by acquiring cultural, visual, computer, technology, research and information management skills to enable them to think critically

    英語教育における流暢さと即興力の育成 ── 中学生の話すことにおける意識の一考察 ──

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    The major goals of this study are to examine junior high school students’ awareness of fluency and impromptu skill in terms of speaking in English as a Foreign Language (hereafter, EFL) and to consider what to do, by way of future research and creation of daily lessons, in order to raise awareness and to develop their practical speaking abilities. Recent Japanese EFL education (see MEXT 2017a-e) emphasizes that developing learners’ fluency and impromptu skill is particularly important. This is because traditional Japanese EFL education has focused on acquisition of grammar, drawing learners’ attention to individual forms rather than to meaning. Problematic outcomes of such an approach are tendencies for learners to comprehend texts/utterances in a heavy bottom-up manner and to refrain from speaking/writing without confirming that what they are about to say/write is grammatically correct. In this study, 419 junior high school students in 1st to 3rd grades responded to a short paper-and-pencil questionnaire that examined their awareness of fluency and impromptu skill in EFL speaking. Results of analyses showed a significant difference in awareness of impromptu skill between 1st and 2nd grades and between 1st and 3rd grades, whereas no significant differences were found in awareness of fluency between these three grades. Moreover, results of analyses showed no correlation between 1st graders’ mid-term/ final exam scores and their awareness of fluency/impromptu skill, but showed a correlation between 2nd graders’ final exam scores and their awareness of fluency and between 2nd graders’ final exam scores and their awareness of impromptu skill. Based on this and other information obtained in the study, we consider issues for future research and creation of classroom activities that develop fluency and impromptu skill in Japanese EFL education

    Defining Workplace Information Fluency Skills For Technical Communication Students

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    Information fluency refers to the ability to recognize information needs and to gather, evaluate, and communicate information appropriately. In this study, I treat information fluency as both an overall competency and as a collection of knowledge and skills. The purpose of this study is to explore the specific workplace information fluency skills valued by employers of technical communicators, to find out how instructors perceive and teach these skills, and to suggest how these findings can inform our teaching practices. Within the framework of qualitative methodology, this study employs two data-collection instruments, including a content analysis of online job recruitment postings and a survey of technical communication instructors across the United States. The study discovers that when hiring technical communicators, employers require candidates to have skills in information processing, information technology, and critical thinking. Candidates must be able to identify their information needs, and must know how to use specified tools to gather, evaluate, and communicate information. It also reveals that although information fluency is a new terminology to a majority of instructors, the skill sets that constitute information fluency already existed in their knowledge. The study\u27s last finding suggests that the opportunity for an internship is perceived as the most helpful in students\u27 acquisition of information fluency skills. This dissertation concludes with a list of specific employer-valued information fluency skills, recommendations for program administrators and instructors for implementing information fluency, as well as recommendations for future researches on this subject

    Building a Professional Learning Community at the University Level: A Case Study of an Information Fluency Initiative

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    An examination of the research regarding the problems associated with student academic writing indicated that two abilities, writing abilities and information literacy skills, intersect, and that an accepted term for this intersection is information literacy. The University of Central Florida’s Information Fluency Initiative recognized information literacy as a key component in developing students’ information fluency skills. This qualitative case study of the initiative used semi-structured interviews, study of documents, and observations to gather data in order to describe how the university planned, developed, and implemented the initiative. Study of relevant literature, narrative analysis (Tierney & Lincoln, 1997), inductive analysis (Hatch, 2002) and the elements of educational criticism (Eisner, 1998) informed the analysis of data. Participants in the Information Fluency Initiative identified as successful the creation of online information literacy modules by librarians and faculty, program-wide efforts to embed information fluency into curriculum, and individual faculty projects. Additionally, the initiative encouraged a scholarly approach to the study of information fluency with the implementation of an annual Information Fluency Conference held at the University of Central Florida and publication of a peer-reviewed Information Fluency Journal. Results from the study suggested that administrative support for the initiative and the leadership’s empowerment of faculty and librarians to undertake leadership roles were important factors in the initiative’s success. Results also suggested that collaboration between faculty, librarians, and instructional technologists to construct curriculum produced a professional learning community that proved valuable to participants both professionally and personally

    Establishing Twenty-First-Century Information Fluency

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    In an effort to infuse information fluency into programming and curriculum, consideration of the learning environment and methods for integrating technology is essential

    Welcoming the culture of computing into the K-12 classroom: Technological fluency and lessons learned from second language acquisition and cross-cultural studies

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    Discusses the integration of innovative technologies into the K-12 curriculum and its impact on instructional programs for linguistically and culturally diverse students. Describes the debate over whether the culture of computing is inclusive or exclusive, examining: educational technology standards; information technology and fluency; speech registers; postulating registers of information technology fluency; and the role of automaticity in developing fluency

    Reading fluency in children who are deaf or hard of hearing

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    This literature review explores the role of reading fluency in children who are deaf or hard of hearing and the essential role reading fluency plays in reading comprehension. The information gathered in this paper supports the importance of direct instruction of reading fluency with children who are deaf or hard of hearing
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