406 research outputs found

    COVID-19 Booster Vaccine Acceptance in Ethnic Minority Individuals in the United Kingdom: a mixed-methods study using Protection Motivation Theory

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    Background: Uptake of the COVID-19 booster vaccine among ethnic minority individuals has been lower than in the general population. However, there is little research examining the psychosocial factors that contribute to COVID-19 booster vaccine hesitancy in this population.Aim: Our study aimed to determine which factors predicted COVID-19 vaccination intention in minority ethnic individuals in Middlesbrough, using Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) and COVID-19 conspiracy beliefs, in addition to demographic variables.Method: We used a mixed-methods approach. Quantitative data were collected using an online survey. Qualitative data were collected using semi-structured interviews. 64 minority ethnic individuals (33 females, 31 males; mage = 31.06, SD = 8.36) completed the survey assessing PMT constructs, COVID-19conspiracy beliefs and demographic factors. 42.2% had received the booster vaccine, 57.6% had not. 16 survey respondents were interviewed online to gain further insight into factors affecting booster vaccineacceptance.Results: Multiple regression analysis showed that perceived susceptibility to COVID-19 was a significant predictor of booster vaccination intention, with higher perceived susceptibility being associated with higher intention to get the booster. Additionally, COVID-19 conspiracy beliefs significantly predictedintention to get the booster vaccine, with higher conspiracy beliefs being associated with lower intention to get the booster dose. Thematic analysis of the interview data showed that barriers to COVID-19 booster vaccination included time constraints and a perceived lack of practical support in the event ofexperiencing side effects. Furthermore, there was a lack of confidence in the vaccine, with individuals seeing it as lacking sufficient research. Participants also spoke of medical mistrust due to historical events involving medical experimentation on minority ethnic individuals.Conclusion: PMT and conspiracy beliefs predict COVID-19 booster vaccination in minority ethnic individuals. To help increase vaccine uptake, community leaders need to be involved in addressing people’s concerns, misassumptions, and lack of confidence in COVID-19 vaccination

    'Making an Exhibition of Herself' - Women, Art and Birmingham, 1860-1920

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    This thesis examines the significant contribution of women to Birmingham’s art culture between 1860 and 1920. It studies the activities of more than fifty women and demonstrates the extensive range of their art world experiences with priority given to those who have not previously received sustained scholarly attention. Most of the case study women were artists and their considerable involvement in the key areas of art education, art making, art exhibition and the art market form the basis of the first four chapters. The important contribution of non-artist women is considered for the first time in the fifth chapter on sociability and philanthropy. Birmingham women artists developed their professional art careers via a range of activities such as personal and professional networking, collaborative making, memberships to art societies and international travel. Sometimes their activities conformed to gendered societal expectations and other times challenged them. As award-winning art students, they played a vital role in the prominent reputation of Birmingham’s School of Art. As professional artists, they created art works in a wide variety of media, exhibiting and marketing them extensively to generate sales. This thesis also considers the participation of Birmingham women artists in national and international art worlds. It includes examples of women from outside Birmingham, some of them famous artists, participating in Birmingham’s art world. This examination of women in Birmingham’s art world provides an important new contribution to our knowledge of the history of art education, women’s professional work and social art history of Birmingham

    The Adirondack Chronology

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    The Adirondack Chronology is intended to be a useful resource for researchers and others interested in the Adirondacks and Adirondack history.https://digitalworks.union.edu/arlpublications/1000/thumbnail.jp

    Star Chamber Matters

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    An extraordinary court with late medieval roots in the activities of the king’s council, Star Chamber came into its own over the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, before being abolished in 1641 by members of parliament for what they deemed egregious abuses of royal power. Before its demise, the court heard a wide range of disputes in cases framed as fraud, libel, riot, and more. In so doing, it produced records of a sort that make its archive invaluable to many researchers today for insights into both the ordinary and extraordinary. The chapters gathered here explore what we can learn about the history of an age through both the practices of its courts and the disputes of the people who came before them. With Star Chamber, we view a court that came of age in an era of social, legal, religious, and political transformation, and one that left an exceptional wealth of documentation that will repay further study

    The Land of the English Kin

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    Twenty-nine studies, covering a wide range of themes, present the most up-to-date thinking on the history, archaeology and toponymy of Anglo-Saxon England, with particular attention to Wessex, in honour of Professor Barbara Yorke. ; Readership: This book will appeal to historians, archaeologists and place-name scholars of the early medieval period and those interested in more specifically in the Anglo-Saxon world and the kingdom of Wessex

    AN IRISHMAN ABROAD: NATIONALIST AND COSMOPOLITAN CROSS-CURRENTS IN STANFORD’S ORGAN MUSIC

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    Among the great, but mostly hidden, treasures of the late-Romantic organ repertoire is the oeuvre of Sir Charles Villiers Stanford. The neglect of this music (even most organists are conversant with only a small portion, if any, of it) accords with the curious nature of Stanford’s more general reputation. Although his name has never entirely faded from public consciousness – any encyclopaedia article about British musical history will include him – regrettably little of his output has won a big public, except for his contributions to Anglican choralism. Before his non-Anglican works began appearing in large numbers on Compact Disc during the 1990s, the situation was still worse. The present thesis explores several factors that made Stanford’s contributions to organ music distinctive. (Most of these contributions date from well after Stanford ceased playing the instrument on a regular basis.) His Irish upbringing put him at one remove from his English colleagues. Subsequently his German training differed a good deal from the tuition that most English cathedral organists experienced in his own time. Perhaps most important of all was Stanford’s multifaceted activity as a conductor and, most conspicuously, as a pedagogue. Much of the neglect that still surrounds most of his creations is connected to numerous historians’ over-emphasis upon his teaching: an over-emphasis that Stanford’s own son deplored. After supplying in Chapter Two biographical information which indicates the most significant of Stanford’s formative influences, I furnish in Chapter Three details of organ composition in nineteenth-century Europe as a whole, and Victorian Britain specifically. I discuss the symbiotic relationship between increasingly elaborate organ construction – the impact of Aristide Cavaillé-Coll’s structural innovations could be felt well beyond France, as I note in some detail – and the increasingly symphonic character of much nineteenth-century organ music. In addition, I discuss the rise of concert organists, operating outside ecclesiastical environments, and Stanford’s own refusal to undertake regular organ-playing duties after the 1890s. All these factors must be considered in any discussion of Stanford’s works for (to quote Mozart’s phrase) ‘the King of Instruments.’ The fact that Stanford had so complex – not to say agonised – a relationship with both his native land and his adopted land has made it necessary for me to allude, in Chapter Four, to several twentieth-century and twenty-first-century theorists of nationalism. Stanford’s attitude towards music’s past was likewise complex: he avoided both pastiche on the one hand, and on the other hand undue trepidation towards his precursors’ achievements. In Chapters Five and Six, I concentrate on detailed score-based analysis of as many Stanford organ works as the space constraints of a thesis permit me to consider. These two chapters represent the core of the present document (a complete list of Stanford’s organ compositions can be found in an appendix on page 228). Much of the chapters’ content derives from my own experience as an organist in Australia, one whose repertoire – in churches, in recitals, and on CD – has included various Stanford pieces. My approach to the analysis has been to divide the relevant material according to the functions that Stanford had in mind for it: he clearly intended some of it for church use, while some of it (in particular the five sonatas) he just as clearly intended for recital use. With Chapter Seven I trace Stanford’s reception history, which on several counts is unlike that of any other British composer. I examine the wider cultural factors which long made this history problematic, and still other cultural factors (of more recent origin) which suggest that at last Stanford’s time has come. Vaughan Williams’s 1952 prophecy ‘I believe that he [Stanford] will return again’ is more plausible in 2021 than it had been at any time since Stanford’s own death ninety-seven years ago. The concluding Chapter Eight points to further profitable lines of Stanford-related research, and it stresses Stanford’s own importance for those who would seek a more rounded view of Victorian-Edwardian music than habitually prevails

    Calf and Heifer Feeding and Management

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    From birth to first calving, the replacement heifer undergoes tremendous changes anatomically as well as in feeding and management practices. The calf changes from being a pseudo-monogastric to a full ruminant within a period of two months. During the same period, the calf is fed colostrum, milk, or milk replacer, and starter with or without hay. Notably, the lifetime milk production and health of a dairy cow is highly dependent on early life nutrition and management of the calf and, subsequently, the heifer. Hence, animal scientists continue to investigate critical areas such as colostrum feeding, the level of liquid feeding, gut microbial succession, energy and protein levels, housing, health management, and their interactions with the animal in an effort to help dairy producers raise successful and sustainable dairy enterprises

    50 Years Celebrating Earth, Atmosphere, Astronomy, and Oceans: Stories of a Great Department

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