4,452 research outputs found

    The big break : race and gender in Pawnee Bill's Historic Wild West, 1888-1913.

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    Wild West shows such as that organized by Gordon William "Pawnee Bill" Lillie were the national pastime of America, and endeavored to teach Euro-Americans about life on the western frontier. Pawnee Bill's traveling show was a large, complicated, and dangerous operation due to turn-of-the-century railroad travel and the difficulties of performing with wild animals. For the early cowgirls, American Indian women, and Georgians, employment in Pawnee Bill's Historic Wild West meant societal, cultural, and economic opportunity. The early cowgirls pushed the boundaries of society by their riding style, dress, and new pastimes. Despite stereotypical portrayals as "squaws" or "princesses," participation in the Wild West shows let American Indian women preserve their traditional way of life, escape the reservations, and keep their children with them and out of the boarding schools. Show organizers falsely billed the Georgian riders as "Russian Cossacks," but they nonetheless earned more money with an American tent show than they could in their civil war-torn country, and took it home to help feed their families. For these three groups, employment in Pawnee Bill's Historic Wild West was their "big break;" their chance to make their lives a little better

    2005-06 Jackrabbit Equestrian Media Guide : The Inaugural Season

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    This is the South Dakota State University Jackrabbit Equestrian inaugural season media guide.https://openprairie.sdstate.edu/equestrian-guides/1000/thumbnail.jp

    The Palimpsest, vol.35 no.7, July 1954

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    The Palimpsest, vol.35 no.7, July 1954

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    New Student Directory, the Class of 1981

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    Directory of newly admitted students and new faculty members. The student directory includes photographs of the 610 students and student information including name, high school attended, city and state, activities, and/or area of academic interest. The 138 page directory is a simple paper bound booklet with a black and white photograph of the boulder near McGaw Chapel on the cover and the title \u27The New People, a Directory of New Students at the College of Wooster\u27.https://openworks.wooster.edu/directories/1029/thumbnail.jp

    Mobile Ideas and (Im)mobile Subjects: Women Writers and Women\u27s Fashion Magazines in Nineteenth-Century Germany and Austria

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    This dissertation explores how gender, class, and national identity were constructed and presented in three prominent nineteenth-century women\u27s magazines: Der Bazar, Illustrirte Damenzeitung, La Mode Illustrée, Journal de la Famille, and Harper\u27s Bazar), as well as in the works of three women writers of the time: Louise Otto, Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach, and Rosa Mayreder) through the lens of social, physical, and geographical mobility for women. At a time of increasing industrialization and communication between countries of the Western world, the discourse on women\u27s roles, as intersecting with their class and national belonging, was in many ways formed on an international level. Nineteenth-century femininity, like gender and class roles in general, thus became a product of broader discourses shaped by many voices and ideologies. This construction of class and gender roles on an international level begs the question of what remained national and particular to a given place and culture. By looking at how Der Bazar presented the image of the German wife and mother in comparison to its French and American sister publications, this dissertation offers insight into the process of forming a German identity during the mid to late-nineteenth century. Moreover, an analysis of the works written by Otto, Ebner-Eschenbach, and Mayreder and the ways in which these authors\u27 texts wrote back to the popular discourses on femininity offers a more nuanced understanding of a complex social landscape. As both the magazines and the works by these three women writers centered on the lives of nineteenth-century women, the texts and images presented to readers concentrated mainly on the domestic - the nineteenth-century woman\u27s natural habitat. Items that were both associated with femininity and played a role in women\u27s mobility: physical, geographical, social) were particularly telling of the roles and spaces allotted to women and the flexibility and freedom associated with them. Thus, a look at the corset and the crinoline: as symbols of physical mobility), the shoe and the riding habit: as symbols of geographical mobility) and, finally, at women\u27s education: as a vehicle of social mobility) reveals how fashion magazines and prominent women\u27s voices of the time engaged in the discourse surrounding women\u27s lives

    RIDING THROUGH LIFE: A LIFESPAN STUDY OF THE ATTITUDES, BEHAVIORS, AND AREAS OF EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY FOR FEMALE EQUESTRIANS TOWARD BRA USE AND HEALTH OUTCOMES WHEN ENGAGED IN EQUESTRIAN SPORTS

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    Equestrian sport is a popular exercise choice for females of all ages, although the links between this exercise choice, health outcomes, and risk to health have not been thoroughly examined. These issues are of particular interest because the female equestrian has the opportunity to ride and/or compete for decades, from early to very late in life, covering almost the full sequence of the female lifespan. Equestrian sports provide physical activity through riding and caring for the horse, and promote positive mental outcomes through tangible practices, such as engaging in physical activity and hard work, goal-setting, acquisition of skills, and participation in a strong community of practice. Equestrianism is an under-researched activity and sport, but increased understanding of female equestrian health and wellness outcomes may contribute to better health and wellness outcomes for female riders. Since equestrian sports participants are predominantly female, with 74% to 80% of the riding population being women, it is important to understand and potentially improve the health and wellness of female riders. This improved understanding may provide their riding careers with increased longevity, comfort, and healthy. It may allow them to enjoy the sport, whatever their age, minimizing or preventing any health issues. A deeper understanding of mental and physical changes from riding will educate and empower women so they are making informed decisions as they ride, talk to their coaches and doctors, and invest in equipment ranging from sport-specific bras to saddles. Manufacturers may also become aware of the potential opportunity to market female-focused products to this community of practice, which has a demonstrated commitment to the horse and accompanying expenditures. Most research is centered on the horse or major equestrian injuries (death, concussion, bone breakage), but it is hypothesized that having an increased understanding of other health issues, ranging from breast, bladder, and groin health to bone density, weight, and body image, may be of great value. The following master’s thesis will review the current literature related to female health as it relates to equestrian sports; report results of a research survey conducted about female equestrian health and wellness, with a focus on breast health and bra use; discuss the survey results; and make recommendations for future research in this area

    The Echo: March 4, 2005

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    Mancinelli grabs SBP election – Plato’s influence remains on campus – 300 students attend TABS conference – TU needs more water to expand – New book chronicles TU women’s experiences – Applications Needed – Women’s conference accepts no substitutes this year – Take ten minutes, win an iPod! – It’s alright cause I’m Saved by the Bell – Yes, Taylor, there is an equestrian team – Faculty Close-Up – Eating out? Try Trejo’s for good food and prices – My favorite animal is bacon – Passionate and hiding it – Coming to Taylor soon? – Letters to the editor – SBM seeks dating opportunities – Kenyan history: a closer look – Letters to the editor & cartoons – IFC host concert featuring Saxon Shore, Anathallo – Legendary Motown group remembered ......The Temptations – Upcoming Taylor Music Events – Jars of Clay and Christian music’s last gasp – Pottery by Dick Lehman – Lady Trojans receive bid to tourney –Men’s Scouting report – Women’s Scouting report – Back to Bransonhttps://pillars.taylor.edu/echo-2004-2005/1019/thumbnail.jp

    Ranching Women in Southern Alberta

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    Settler ranching in southern Alberta conjures the image of a lone cowboy riding through the foothills or a stoic ranch hand roping errant cattle. But women have always played an integral part in the cattle industry, often working without recognition or support to meet the challenge of the frontier. Ranching Women in Southern Alberta examines the rhythms, routines, and realities of women’s lives on family ranches. As these ranches replaced the large-scale cattle operations that once covered thousands of acres, women were called upon to ensure not only the ongoing economic viability of their ranches, but also the social harmony of their families and communities. At the same time, ranching women enjoyed personal freedoms and opportunities unknown to their urban and European contemporaries. The great-granddaughter of pioneer ranchers, Rachel Herbert brings a unique insight to the stories of these brave and talented women who carved a role for themselves and their daughters during the dawn of the family ranch
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