45,814 research outputs found

    Arlington Memorial Bridge Spans the Decades as a Study in Long-Term Price Change

    Get PDF
    [Excerpt] The Arlington Memorial Bridge is one of seven existing bridges that carry automobile traffic across the Potomac River to and from Washington, DC. Though there have been bridges crossing the Potomac in the area since the first bridge constructed at the site of the Chain Bridge in 1797, these early bridges were often damaged by environmental factors, and others were replaced over time. Thus, the Arlington Memorial Bridge, opened for use on January 18, 1932, is the second-oldest of the bridges currently in use, after the Francis Scott Key Bridge (completed in 1923.) This article examines the history of the Arlington Memorial Bridge and compares the original construction with a contemporary proposed rebuilding of it, which provides an interesting illustration of long-term price change in the United States, with the help of Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data

    Climate Change Impact Assessment for Surface Transportation in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska

    Get PDF
    WA-RD 772.

    Community Reclamation: the Hybrid Building

    Get PDF
    Reclamation of a city involves reusing abandoned buildings in conjunction with new construction. These negative spaces of disuse generated by a changing infrastructure are often overlooked or destroyed. If they are instead viewed as positive spaces for reuse, a city’s infrastructure and its residents can adapt and grow. Recognizing these newly positive spaces produces a chance to examine what social needs of the community are not being met. Pushing the modern concept of the hybrid building creates a unique opportunity; flexibility of use derived from flexibility of space. A community building can best serve the social needs of its residents by having the ability to adapt to changes in those needs

    Impact of a Lock Failure on Commodity Transportation on the Mississippi or Illinois Waterway

    Get PDF
    This in-depth study for the Illinois Chamber of Commerce determines the economic impact of lock failures on the Illinois and Upper Mississippi Rivers.Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Livestock Production/Industries,

    Remote sensing program

    Get PDF
    Built on Cornell's thirty years of experience in aerial photographic studies, the NASA-sponsored remote sensing program strengthened instruction and research in remote sensing, established communication links within and beyond the university community, and conducted research projects for or with town, county, state, federal, and private organizations in New York State. The 43 completed applied research projects are listed as well as 13 spinoff grants/contracts. The curriculum offered, consultations provided, and data processing facilities available are described. Publications engendered are listed including the thesis of graduates in the remote sensing program

    The Slow Mo\u27 Main Street Concept Plan

    Get PDF
    Mosier is a community located in the scenic Columbia River Gorge that is small enough to make a difference. Mosier prides itself on its historic roots, progressive community, its role as a gateway to the agricultural valleys of Eastern Oregon. Unfortunately, Mosier\u27s Main Street, Historic Highway 30, does not reflect the community\u27s commitment to sustainability, economic development, and multimodal transportation. The Slow Mo\u27 Main Street Concept Plan is a high-level guide for future transportation planning along highway 30 in downtown Mosier. The plan outlines conceptual design strategies and programmatic recommendations for Highway 30, to help ensure that Mosier\u27s Main Street reflects community priorities, supports a thriving downtown, and creates a safe and inviting corridor for people traveling on foot, by bike, and by motor vehicle. This project was conducted under the supervision of Sy Adler Marisa Zapata and Susan Harnett

    Connect Cascade Locks: A Trails Plan for Economic Development

    Get PDF
    Located in the heart of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, the City of Cascade Locks is a point of entry for regional and national trail systems. Recreational development opportunities abound for the community including mountain biking, hiking, sailing, bird watching, road biking, wind surfing, fishing, and camping. As the only city located directly on the Pacific Crest Trail, Cascade Locks sees thousands of hikers pass through every year. The Historic Columbia River Highway, a National Scenic Byway, draws in bicyclists and motorists from across the region. With these opportunities in mind, Celilo Planning Studio worked with the Port of Cascade Locks to develop a plan that identifies potential areas for economic growth. The purpose of Connect Cascade Locks is to increase the economic development prospects of the community of Cascade Locks through a regionally integrated recreational trails network. Connect Cascade Locks focuses on increasing access to regional trails in town, trail stewardship, identifying goods and services that trail users desire, developing opportunities for local businesses, and recognizing existing local attractions. This plan capitalizes on existing opportunities as well as the enthusiasm of the Cascade Locks community to help revitalize the town. Connect Cascade Locks has already galvanized partner organizations such as the Port and ODOT to start planning new trails and outdoor recreation opportunities in Cascade Locks. The plan is also available at: www.portofcascadelocks.org. This project was conducted under the supervision of Ethan Seltzer and Gil Kelley

    Archeological and Geoarcheological Survey of State Highway 35 between Angleton and Old Ocean, Brazoria County, Texas

    Get PDF
    During March through July 2003, The Center for Archaeological Research of The University of Texas at San Antonio conducted a cultural resources survey, including geoarcheological studies, along portions of State Highway 35 from Angleton to Old Ocean in Brazoria County, Texas. This survey was conducted under Texas Antiquities Permit No. 3091 and was performed for the Texas Department of Transportation, Environmental Affairs Division. During the early phases of the survey, a Historic Context for the project was developed by Hardy-Heck-Moore, Inc. of Austin, Texas. This Historic Context was used to guide the latter phases of the survey, and is reproduced in this document. The project area consisted of a 15-mile-long discontinuous portion of the highway, with variable widths and eight separate detention ponds, varying in area from 2–12 acres each. Nearly 600 auger borings, here substituted for shovel tests, and 176 backhoe trenches were excavated, encountering no significant cultural deposits or features. The artifacts uncovered during these investigations were of recent origin and, therefore, none were collected for analysis and curation. With the exception of testing at site 41BO184, this project completes the cultural resources inventory of the State Highway 35 corridor between Angleton and Old Ocean
    corecore