1,259 research outputs found

    Human Issues in Horticulture: A Bibliography

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    This is a comprehensive bibliography of a rather broad subject area—horticultural therapy. The subject reflects a change in the definition of horticulture as the art and science of growing fruits, vegetables and flowers to include horticulture’s effects on human well-being. The number of citations also reflects the growth and continuing evolvement of this discipline. This bibliography does not include journal articles. It does include monographs, treatises, books, pamphlets, theses, dissertations and media published prior to 2000. The gardening references include a human focus and there are references as well to associated topics such as universal design, accessibility, human perception, environment and behavior.https://newprairiepress.org/ebooks/1004/thumbnail.jp

    Main Hall to Main Street, September 1997

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    This is volume 3, number 4 of Main Hall to Main Street.https://scholarworks.umt.edu/mainhallmainstreet/1021/thumbnail.jp

    Utilization of traditional health care systems by the native population of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

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    Little research has examined the role traditional health care systems play today among Native populations. The present research examined the role these systems play among the urban Native population of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The research was conducted at the Westside Community Clinic, located in the downtown core area of Saskatoon. This area of the city has previously been identified as having a high concentration of Native people. The present study represented one component of a much larger project which examined both Native and non-Native utlization patterns of the Western health care system at the Westside clinic. An interview schedule was used to gather data, with a total of 103 Native and 50 non-Native interviews being conducted. Since no sampling frame exists for the Native population of Saskatoon, an availability sampling technique was used. "Native" was defined in this study as status Indian, non-status Indian and Metis. It was discovered that traditional health care systems play an important role in the health care of this population, with the use of these systems being quite extensive. It was determined that the variable of language was a somewhat useful predictor of the utilization of traditional health care systems, although language retention (the ability to speak a Native language) was found to be more important than the frequency with which a Native language was spoken. It was also discovered that use of traditional health care systems was not found only among older respondents, but rather was generalized among the respondents. The economic variables of income and education levels were also found to be related to utilization of traditional health care systems, with those respondents with higher income and education levels reporting greater use of these systems. Use of traditional health care systems was not found to be restricted to respondents with Indian status; rather, use was generalized among status Indian, non-status Indian and Metis respondents.Respondents who utilized traditional health care systems also fully utilized the Western health care system. Further, use of traditional health care systems was not found to be related to difficulty respondents may have encountered in using the Western health care system, such as language or economic problems, or experiences of racism, although such problems were found to exist. Clearly, respondents did not turn to traditional health care systems because of difficulties in utilizing the Western health care system. Rather, traditional health care systems were used to supplement the Western health care system. It was further found that the majority of the respondents in the study desired access to traditional medicines and healers within the city of Saskatoon-and, again, this finding was not confined to any sub-group (I.e. older respondents) of the study but was generalized. The extent to which this access is presently available is questioned, and this could represent an important unmet health need of this population

    The Emergence of Naturopathy in Two Canadian Provinces: British Columbia and Ontario, 1920-1970

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    This paper explores the development and regulation of naturopathy in two Canadian provinces, Ontario and British Columbia, prior to 1950. Naturopathy has been a regulated profession in British Columbia since 1936. In Ontario the regulated group, since 1926 until recently, has been ‘drugless therapy.’ Through a comparative case study we not only document the early history of naturopathy, and its regulation, but we explore the factors shaping professional regulation and development historically. In particular, we highlight the importance of provincial patterns of professional regulation, and inter-professional relations in shaping regulatory trajectories.Voici un article qui traite de l’évolution et de la réglementation de la naturopathie dans deux provinces canadiennes, l’Ontario et la Colombie-Britannique, avant 1950. La naturopathie est une profession réglementée en Colombie-Britannique depuis 1936. En Ontario, le groupe réglementé a été, de 1926 jusqu’à tout récemment, celui des « praticiens ne prescrivant pas de médicaments ». Au moyen d’une étude de cas comparative, nous rendons compte des débuts de la naturopathie et de sa réglementation, mais nous étudions aussi les facteurs qui, pendant très longtemps, ont façonné la réglementation et l’évolution des professions. Nous soulignons en particulier l’importance des caractéristiques provinciales de la réglementation des professions et celle des relations interprofessionnelles dans l’orientation des trajectoires en matière de réglementation

    Gitksan medicinal plants-cultural choice and efficacy

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    BACKGROUND: The use of plants for healing by any cultural group is integrally related to local concepts of the nature of disease, the nature of plants, and the world view of the culture. The physical and chemical properties of the plants themselves also bear on their selection by people for medicines, as does the array of plants available for people to choose from. I examine use of medicinal plants from a "biobehavioral" perspective to illuminate cultural selection of plants used for medicine by the Gitksan of northwestern British Columbia, Canada. METHODS: Consultant consensus, "intercultural consensus", independent use of the same plants by other cultural groups, and phytochemistry and bioassay results from the literature, were employed in analysis of probable empirical efficacy of plant uses. RESULTS: 70% of 37 Gitksan medicinal plants were used similarly by other cultures where direct diffusion is not known to have occurred; eleven plants, including the eight most frequently mentioned medicinal plants, also show active phytochemicals or bioassays indicating probable physiologically based therapeutic effects. CONCLUSION: Analysis of intercultural consensus revealed that the majority of cultures in the British Columbia region within the plant ranges use the same plants, or closely related species, in similar ways. The rigor of this analysis is effected by the lack of consistent data on all taxa of interest for all cultures within the region

    Monthly Planet, 1986, May

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    https://cedar.wwu.edu/planet/1109/thumbnail.jp

    UWOMJ Volume 35, Number 2, January 1965

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    Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistryhttps://ir.lib.uwo.ca/uwomj/1187/thumbnail.jp

    Practice patterns of naturopathic physicians: results from a random survey of licensed practitioners in two US States

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    BACKGROUND: Despite the growing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by consumers in the U.S., little is known about the practice of CAM providers. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the practice patterns of naturopathic physicians in Washington State and Connecticut. METHODS: Telephone interviews were conducted with state-wide random samples of licensed naturopathic physicians and data were collected on consecutive patient visits in 1998 and 1999. The main outcome measures were: Sociodemographic, training and practice characteristics of naturopathic physicians; and demographics, reasons for visit, types of treatments, payment source and visit duration for patients. RESULT: One hundred and seventy practitioners were interviewed and 99 recorded data on a total of 1817 patient visits. Naturopathic physicians in Washington and Connecticut had similar demographic and practice characteristics. Both the practitioners and their patients were primarily White and female. Almost 75% of all naturopathic visits were for chronic complaints, most frequently fatigue, headache, and back symptoms. Complete blood counts, serum chemistries, lipids panels and stool analyses were ordered for 4% to 10% of visits. All other diagnostic tests were ordered less frequently. The most commonly prescribed naturopathic therapeutics were: botanical medicines (51% of visits in Connecticut, 43% in Washington), vitamins (41% and 43%), minerals (35% and 39%), homeopathy (29% and 19%) and allergy treatments (11% and 13%). The mean visit length was about 40 minutes. Approximately half the visits were paid directly by the patient. CONCLUSION: This study provides information that will help other health care providers, patients and policy makers better understand the nature of naturopathic care

    Nature and Architecture: a Holistic Response

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    The general functions of the project will be a natural healing center and research facility for natural medicine. As medical practice and theory begin to shift in the understanding on natural treatment, modern medicine facilities are becoming more environmentally friendly. Hospitals are pursuing sustainable practices as well as seeking LEED certification in the United States. Although LEED is not a necessity for this project, the natural healing center will focus on holistic care as the primary medical treatment option for patients while engaging the project in sustainable design

    Healing Logics

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    Scholars in folklore and anthropology are more directly involved in various aspects of medicine—such as medical education, clinical pastoral care, and negotiation of transcultural issues—than ever before. Old models of investigation that artificially isolated folk medicine, complementary and alternative medicine, and biomedicine as mutually exclusive have proven too limited in exploring the real-life complexities of health belief systems as they observably exist and are applied by contemporary Americans. Recent research strongly suggests that individuals construct their health belief systmes from diverse sources of authority, including community and ethnic tradition, education, spiritual beliefs, personal experience, the influence of popular media, and perception of the goals and means of formal medicine. Healing Logics explores the diversity of these belief systems and how they interact—in competing, conflicting, and sometimes remarkably congruent ways. This book contains essays by leading scholars in the field and a comprehensive bibliography of folklore and medicine.https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/usupress_pubs/1066/thumbnail.jp
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