684 research outputs found

    Canadian Patriotism and the Timbit: A Rhetorical Analysis of Tim Horton\u27s Inc.\u27s Canadian Connection through the Application of Semiotics

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    This study examines the content of Tim Horton\u27s television advertisements from 1980 to 2014 from a communication perspective. Using Peirce\u27s semiotic theory, this study examines the significations of Canadian culture as they appear within each advertisement for the purpose of establishing the time and extent to which Canadian culture was used over the course of Tim Horton\u27s advertising history. This study finds that Tim Horton\u27s advertisements did not purposefully use Canadian significations during the 1980s to create a connection between their brand and Canadian patriotism. However, after discovering Canadians\u27 natural affinity to the Tim Horton\u27s brand through focus group research in 1996, the Tim Horton\u27s marketing team changed the focus of their advertising to reflect the attitudes of their research subjects. Starting with the True Stories campaign, Tim Horton\u27s began to focus on the Canadian citizens who found community and national identity through purchasing their products. In the 2000s and 2010s, the Canadian significations grew stronger, including a much greater focus on hockey, using a national hockey icon, Sidney Crosby, as the country\u27s voice. Although Tim Horton\u27s continues to produce a small percentage of their advertisements that focus on specific Tim Horton\u27s products, the majority of Tim Horton\u27s advertisements have maintained a consistent message through their use of Canadian significations, stating that Canada is snow, hockey, community, nature and a good cup of Tim Horton\u27s coffee

    Beyond the flagship: politics & transatlantic trade in American department stores, 1900-1945

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    Historians have long viewed American department stores as barometers of social change, anchors of modern urban life, and purveyors of a new kind of consumer capitalist culture. In its heyday, from the late nineteenth century to the middle twentieth century, the department store was all of these things, but it was also much more. This dissertation draws on business, government, and family papers to reveal how a new kind of businessman, the department store retailer, pioneered powerful political and trade networks that were deeply embedded in Washington and stretched across the Atlantic into the increasingly volatile capitals of Europe. As campaign contributors, trade policy advisors, and political appointees, retailers like John Wanamaker, Isidor Straus, Louis Kirstein, and Ira Hirschmann regularly moved through the inner circles of the national government. They could just as easily be found on Capitol Hill, or at trade offices located in London or Paris, as behind their own desks in the upper floors of Wanamaker’s or Filene’s. Retailers’ command of vast transatlantic trade networks, now largely forgotten, made them key participants in pressing debates about everything from tariff reform and economic recovery to wartime mobilization and the plight of refugees. Yet retailers approached politics and commerce with profoundly different sensibilities than executives at other major American corporations, such as Ford, United Fruit, or Coca Cola. In the retail industry, commercial expansion depended not on the domination of foreign markets and foreign workers, but rather on transnational cooperation and the development of policies and business methods that upheld both the sovereignty and distinctiveness of other nations—and their goods. In this complex era, as the imperatives of trade routinely collided with politics and other large forces, from devastating world wars and widespread depression to the rise of new radical ideologies, retailers did much more than market desire. They brokered vital connections between Americans, Washington, and the world

    Making the West End modern: space, architecture and shopping in 1930s London.

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    This research explores the shopping cultures of the 1930s West End, arguing for the recognition of this as a significant moment within consumption history, hitherto overlooked in favour of the Victorian and Edwardian periods. The approach is interdisciplinary, combining in a new way studies of shopping routes and networks, retail architecture, spectacle, consumer types and consumption practices. The study first establishes the importance of shopping geographies in understanding the character of the 1930s West End. It positions this shopping hub within local, national and international networks. It also examines the gender and class-differentiated shopping routes within the West End, looking at how the rise of new consumer cultures during the period reconfigured this geography. In the second section, a case study of two new Modern shops, Simpson Piccadilly and Peter Jones, provides the focus for a discussion of retail buildings. Architecture is presented as an important way in which the West End was transformed and modernity articulated. Modernism was a significant arrival in the West End's retail sector: it provided a new architectural approach with a close, if often problematic, relationship with shopping. The study thus reassesses common assumptions about the fundamental irreconcilability of modernism with consumption, femininity and spectacle. The third section makes a more detailed examination of the staging of shopping cultures within the West End street, looking at window display, the application of light and decoration to facades, and participation in pageantry. The study thus revisits retail spectacle, an important strand within histories of shopping and of the urban, looking at how established strategies were adapted and developed to stage modernity, emerging consumer cultures and the West End itself during the 1930s

    Millions of Luxurious Citizens : Consumption and Citizenship in the Urban Northeast, 1800-1865

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    In the century following the American Revolution, culturally powerful middle-class citizens in the northeast slowly abandoned a vision of civic non-consumption that rested on the strength of imperial boycotts and instead converted their consumption of luxury goods and products into a civic act. This dissertation reveals how these citizens challenged the limitations that a republican vision of political economy placed on consumers in the early republic. Through discussions over taxation, tariff and market regulation, middle-class men and women struggled to define their civic rights and obligations as consumers in a capitalist democracy. As they began to imagine their civic identity more in terms of their capacity as consumers rather than producers, well-off citizens created a new vision of economic citizenship that acknowledged the consumer as a rights-bearing individual. By the end of the Civil War, middle-class Americans in the North had transformed the civic dimensions of consumption. By disconnecting consumption from a republican political economy, middle-class citizens made consumption part of a new politics of representation, freeing themselves from older civic restraints. In doing so, they laid the groundwork for the consumer culture that would escalate rapidly in the twentieth century. Using an analytical framework that combines cultural history with the study of political economy, Millions of Luxurious Citizens asks how it was that nineteenth century middle-class producers, retailers and consumers imagined the demands of the nation\u27s economy and translated those ideas into a vision of citizenship that made shopping in America both a right and an obligation

    Tanks and Tinsel: The American Celebration of Christmas during World War II

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    “Tanks and Tinsel: The American Celebration of Christmas during World War II” is an examination of the American celebration of Christmas during World War II. As the first comprehensive investigation into the most well-known holiday in Western culture and its role in shaping Americans’ experience and understanding of the war, it contributes to historical scholarship in three ways. First, it continues the trend of blending analyses of society into military-focused narratives of the war, and it expands the scope of this by fusing the literature of War and Society with that of Holiday History. Second, it challenges traditional views of the home front by highlighting that Christmas helped to solidify the importance of consumption in the American psyche. Third, it offers an argument as to how American identity and patriotism were tied to these consumerist values and shows how American business leaders and the government used the traditions and rituals associated with Christmas to articulate what servicemen and citizens ought to be fighting for. The celebration of Christmas provided reminders of, and hopes for, times of stability and prosperity in the United States. The holiday’s cultural capital was harnessed to encourage wartime consent, privilege particular values, and structure how individuals and communities, both foreign and domestic, would view America and the war

    Plaza Fiesta: A Re-Imagined Homeland Contributing to Latino Identity and Community

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    This study analyzes the relationship between Plaza Fiesta, a Latino shopping center located in Atlanta, Georgia, and concepts of Latino identity and community formation among immigrants in a U.S. city. It is focused specifically on the complexities of identification for Latin American immigrants, who relate in various ways to Plaza Fiesta. One chapter explores the relationships between product consumption, marketing, spaces, and memory in the production of hybrid identity formations. Another chapter considers the relationship between pan-ethnic Latino identity construction and notions of belonging and not belonging for these Latin American immigrants. The final chapter adds to knowledge about identity by analyzing the complexities and contradictions based on interviews, questionnaires, and observations at Plaza Fiesta. Moreover, this paper examines the importance these topics have with immigration issues and U.S. society. Overall, this paper suggests that Plaza Fiesta plays a role in establishing a sense of Latino community in Atlanta

    Portland Daily Press: July 05,1880

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    https://digitalmaine.com/pdp_1880/1203/thumbnail.jp

    Proceedings of the Sixty-Sixth Annual State Conference for the Daughters of the American Revolution in West Virginia, October 21-23, 1971

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    https://mds.marshall.edu/wvdar/1036/thumbnail.jp

    Paper bullets: the Office Of War Information and American World War II print propaganda

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    Thesis (Ph.D.)--Boston UniversityThis dissertation analyzes American World War II propaganda generated by the Office of War Information (OWI), the nation's primary propaganda agency from 1942 to 1945. The visual rhetoric of printed OWI propaganda, including posters, brochures, newspaper graphics, and magazine illustrations, demonstrated affinities with advertising and modern art and exhibited an increasingly conservative tone as the war progressed. While politically progressive bureaucrats initially molded the OWI's graphic agenda, research reveals how politicians suppressed graphics that displayed the war's violence, racial integration, and progressive gender roles in favor of images resembling commercial advertisements. To articulate the manner in which issues of American self-representation evolved during the war, this study examines the graphic work of artists and designers such as Charles Alston, Thomas Hart Benton, Charles Coiner, Ben Shahn, and Norman Rockwell. The investigation unfolds across four chapters. The first chapter examines the institutional origins of American World War II propaganda by exploring the shifting content of New Deal promotional efforts during the 1930s and early 1940s. This analysis is critical, as government agencies used propaganda not only to support economic recovery during the Great Depression, but also to prepare Americans for war before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. The second chapter analyzes the ways OWI increasingly suppressed depictions of violence as the war progressed. While the agency distributed traumatic images of Axis hostility early in the war, such work was later deemed "too aggressive" by former advertising executives turned federal bureaucrats who preferred more friendly, appealing graphics. The third chapter focuses on propaganda intended for African Americans, whose support for the war was divided due to racist Jim Crow legislation. This section analyzes OWI efforts to address the nation's largest racial minority through posters, brochures, and newspaper graphics. The fourth chapter examines the OWI's efforts to influence middle-class white women, a demographic of consumers whose influence grew as the war progressed. This includes an examination of the OWI's role in modifying the "Rosie the Riveter" mythology in contemporary advertising to encourage women to pursue jobs outside of factory work

    Portland Daily Press: May 16, 1876

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    https://digitalmaine.com/pdp_1876/1114/thumbnail.jp
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