313 research outputs found

    Experience the vanishing lives: fisherina Aberdeen.

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    Lam Fung Ki Selina."Architecture Department, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Master of Architecture Programme 1998-99, design report."Includes bibliographical references (leave 46).AcknowledgementsForewordSummaryIntroductionFisherinaProject SummaryConclusionsBackgroundOutline of ProcessCase Studies (Summary)BackgroundClientUsers AnalysisSite SelectionPhysical ConditionsLocationProblem and OppotunitiesProject BriefSite and ConstraintsSpace ProgramDesign GuidelinesThe DesignDesign DevelopmentFinal DesignBibliographyAppendixCase StudiesInterviewsSchedule of AccomodationsTechnical StudiesVanishing Maritime HeritageStatisticsSite PhotosChronolog

    Two Chinese Cities (Illustrated).

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    Fishers and Territorial Anxieties in China and Vietnam:Narratives of the South China Sea Beyond the Frame of the Nation

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    In the geopolitical conflict over the South China Sea (SCS), fishers are at the center of Chinese and Vietnamese cartographic imaginations that define the sea as either “Chinese” or “Vietnamese” and hence tied to the disputed territories of the Paracel and Spratly Islands. While their historical presence and customary fishing rights in the SCS have been much publicized in the context of this territorial dispute, the long-standing Cham seafaring trade networks and legacy are ignored by both countries. The ethnic and national categories of Cham, Việt, and Han intersect with occupational categories such as those of fisher, trader, shipbuilder, sailor, and pirate, which in the past represented shifting, relational, and situational activities by the same people. The contemporary use of such professional and national labels produces particular political effects by projecting recent closures and enclosures onto the past, in spite of the common historical, cultural, and ethnic flows that always existed in the SCS. Rather than aiming to legitimize or delegitimize Vietnam’s or China’s territorial claims to the SCS, this article argues that seafaring narratives should be liberated from abstract, anachronistic discourses of sovereignty, territoriality, and territorial anxieties that separate the interconnected histories of the Cham, Vietnamese, and Chinese

    A port city in Northeast China: Dengzhou in the Long eighteenth century

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    Between Mountains and the Sea: Trades in Early Nineteenth-Century Northern Vietnam

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    This article attempts to piece together the available data on Sino-Vietnamese trade of northern Vietnam in the early nineteenth century with a focus on its upland region. This essay shares the views expressed in the works by Oscar Salemink, Philip Talor, Sarah Turner and other scholars on northern uplands, and in particular their rejection of the “urban-rural,” “advanced-backward,” “civilized-barbarian,” lowland-highland dichotomies. But building upon these works, this essay also tries to determine what proportion of overland and maritime trade made up the Nguyễn revenue, and to understand the interactions among various peoples living between the mountains and the sea. The data seems to suggest that, contrary to the view that this upland region was remote and consequently isolated, the upland region (outer provinces) near the Sino-Vietnamese border represented an important and even crucial portion of the overall revenue of Nguyễn Vietnam in the early nineteenth century

    Envisioning An Imperial Outpost: The Colonial City And Naval Base of Singapore In Anglo-American Travel And World Affairs Writing, 1900-1942

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    ABSTRACT This thesis analyzes and compares depictions of Singapore and British Malaya from the turn of the twentieth century to 1942, the year the colonial city and naval base fell to Japanese forces. While many studies have looked forward to decolonization after the fall of Singapore, this study looks back to the crucial decades before the Second World War. The primary sources for the study are selected articles and books by American and British journalists, travel writers, and world-affairs observers. These sources show a gradual shift in focus from Singapore as a thriving commercial hub and culturally diverse colonial city to a strategic naval base. The British, the Australians, the Dutch, and the Americans seemed to pin their hopes on the base as a counter to the rise of Japan. As the situation worsened before the end of 1941, the sources indicate the beginnings of a transition from British to American hegemony in Asia Pacific

    Hedunit: The Memoirs of an Ex-Blue Jacket

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    Alex Martin enlisted in the United States Navy in 1898 at age 15, and he served until his 21st birthday in 1904. In these memoirs, written in 1957, he describes life in the old Navy at the turn of the 20th century.https://digitalcommons.cedarville.edu/cedrus_press_publications/1005/thumbnail.jp
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