23,115 research outputs found

    Redefining quality interpersonal communication and communication activities in marriage from divorcees’ perspectives

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    Quality interpersonal communication is essential in the development and maintenance of any relationship, including marriage. As society adapts to new avenues of communication, married couples often underestimate the relevance of interpersonal communication in their relationship due to their lack of understanding of quality interpersonal communication. Therefore, this study investigated the conceptualisation of quality interpersonal communication through the lens of Relational Dialectic Theory and communication activities in marriage from the perspectives of divorcees. This study also explored the antecedents of poor-quality interpersonal communication and its repercussions on married couples. The present study also extended Knapp’s Relational Development Model by incorporating communication technology as a medium of communication. In-depth interviews were conducted on 20 divorcees from different states in Malaysia, chosen through a purposive sampling technique. The gathered data was then evaluated and combined in a thematic data analysis using the NVivo 12 software. This study discovers that the definitions of quality interpersonal communication are divided into seven (7) categories, with communication skills, intimacy, and characters identified as the top three significant traits. Results of this study also indicate that spouses use various medium of communication based on their circumstances but prefer face-to-face communication. However, communication occurrences between spouses are low and mostly negative, with the majority of them mainly involving households and children. The other antecedents of poor-quality interpersonal communication are communication skills, attitudes, third-party involvement, and emotional condition. The current study concludes that emotional condition is one of the protuberant effects of poor-quality interpersonal communication. All in all, the current study provides a new paradigm in Knapp’s Relational Development Model through the incorporation of the effects of poor-quality interpersonal communication into the deterioration stages of the model

    GlyphDraw: Learning to Draw Chinese Characters in Image Synthesis Models Coherently

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    Recent breakthroughs in the field of language-guided image generation have yielded impressive achievements, enabling the creation of high-quality and diverse images based on user instructions. Although the synthesis performance is fascinating, one significant limitation of current image generation models is their insufficient ability to generate coherent text within images, particularly for complex glyph structures like Chinese characters. To address this problem, we introduce GlyphDraw, a general learning framework aiming at endowing image generation models with the capacity to generate images embedded with coherent text. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work in the field of image synthesis to address the generation of Chinese characters. % we first adopt the OCR technique to collect images with Chinese characters as training samples, and extract the text and locations as auxiliary information. We first sophisticatedly design the image-text dataset's construction strategy, then build our model specifically on a diffusion-based image generator and carefully modify the network structure to allow the model to learn drawing Chinese characters with the help of glyph and position information. Furthermore, we maintain the model's open-domain image synthesis capability by preventing catastrophic forgetting by using a variety of training techniques. Extensive qualitative and quantitative experiments demonstrate that our method not only produces accurate Chinese characters as in prompts, but also naturally blends the generated text into the background. Please refer to https://1073521013.github.io/glyph-draw.github.ioComment: 24 pages, 5 figure

    ENHANCING STUDENT ENGAGEMENT, TEACHER SELF-EFFICACY, AND PRINCIPAL LEADERSHIP SKILLS THROUGH MORNING MEETING IN AN ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

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    This study examined the experiences of educators in a small, rural elementary school who provided live instruction in an online setting during the COVID-19 pandemic. The scholarly practitioner collaborated with inquiry partners to enhance student engagement, teacher self-efficacy, and principal leadership skills by implementing Morning Meeting, a social and emotional learning program from Responsive Classroom®, when students participated in remote online learning. The scholarly practitioner used over four decades of research about efficacy and identified leadership strategies and approaches that assisted in building individual and collective teacher efficacy so that teachers could effectively engage students. Behavioral, emotional, and cognitive engagement were identified in research and used by teachers to determine the quality of participation in Morning Meeting. Teachers took daily and weekly attendance to measure engagement, and the scholarly practitioner facilitated team meetings with groups of teachers to compile comments and statements regarding student engagement. These statements were coded using pre-selected codes based on research about types of student engagement. The scholarly practitioner facilitated the administration of a pre-study and post-study Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale so that individual, grade-span, and full-school efficacy data could be compiled. In addition, the scholarly practitioner held team meetings with the teachers to compile comments and categorize those statements into four areas: job accomplishment, skill development, social interaction, and coping with job stress. These four areas were also coded using the four categories described on the Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale. The scholarly practitioner also maintained a journal using a self-reflection tool about the lived experiences before, during, and after the study. The emphasis on this journal was about the development and growth of leadership skills, and the categories were pre-coded using Bernard Bass’s categories of transformational leadership: individualized consideration, inspirational motivation, idealized influence, and intellectual stimulation. Student engagement increased throughout the study, and 77 percent of students were fully engaged during the study. Teachers expressed an increase in collective efficacy at the conclusion of the study, and six of the eight teachers reported individual increases in efficacy. The scholarly practitioner’s use of differentiation within the context of transformational leadership was observed most frequently in the study

    Strategies for Early Learners

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    Welcome to learning about how to effectively plan curriculum for young children. This textbook will address: • Developing curriculum through the planning cycle • Theories that inform what we know about how children learn and the best ways for teachers to support learning • The three components of developmentally appropriate practice • Importance and value of play and intentional teaching • Different models of curriculum • Process of lesson planning (documenting planned experiences for children) • Physical, temporal, and social environments that set the stage for children’s learning • Appropriate guidance techniques to support children’s behaviors as the self-regulation abilities mature. • Planning for preschool-aged children in specific domains including o Physical development o Language and literacy o Math o Science o Creative (the visual and performing arts) o Diversity (social science and history) o Health and safety • Making children’s learning visible through documentation and assessmenthttps://scholar.utc.edu/open-textbooks/1001/thumbnail.jp

    On the Education of a Psychiatrist: Notes from the Field

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    The overarching borrowed question that frames the work of this PhD asks, "What does an education in psychiatry do to a psychiatrist?" Early in my practice of child and adolescent psychiatry, the "know how" in the custodianship of care neither readily nor easily translated into "show how," resulting in a pedagogical conundrum that belatedly registered as uncomfortable emotional symptoms about my education. This nidus of professional confusion and uncertainty creates the context for my inquiry into the complexities and dilemmas of contemporary matters of medical education, specifically as it pertains to my identity as a psychiatrist. To probe these queries, three non-traditional, blended methodologies are relied upon. John Forrester's "thinking in cases" is utilized in reading memoirs and critical histories in psychiatry, such that the thesis can be read as a case of many educational cases. I stay close to the reading of Oliver Sacks' memoir whose work in neurology also grapples with questions of the mind; an idea which becomes a leitmotif in my own autoethnographic reflections for re-constructing my education in psychiatry and its potential beginnings as a trainee and educator in both Canada and Uganda. Weaving in and out of historical observations made by Foucault about psychiatry and linking them to Sacks' recall of numerous medical institutional encounters, I tackle the problem of matricide in an educational arena weary of newness and how this deadly curriculum can be generative in its intent. Through attempts at engaging a decolonizing discourse about my experiences as a clinician educator in Uganda, the concept of an educational void and how it was both ruthlessly encountered as a situational dilemma but underwent a thought transformation to understand it as a survival tactic, is described. Psychoanalytic orientations are heavily leaned upon in my interpretations, highlighting the emotional logic inherent in the transference sites constituting the human work of medical practice and education. Broad themes emerge focusing on history, place, gender, and positioning of the body as educational markers speaking to a different kind of experiential pedagogy predicated on somatic revelations to make the mind intelligible in its relevance to the temporality of education. I arrive at the fault lines of education, difficult knowledge, and the uncertainties, including the frailty of my own self as a resource for the mind, that form educational myths needed to tackle obstacles to learning. Through this process, a personal and professional awakening occurs

    LANGUAGE STYLE IN COSMETICS ADVERTISEMENT

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    Language style is a lovely language that is used to enhance an effect by presenting and contrasting a specific object or thing with other general objects or things. Language style can be defined as a method of conveying thoughts through language that reflects the writer's soul and personality. The advertisement that was analyzed in this research Estee Lauder. In this research, the writer is interested in analyzing language style in cosmetics advertisement. The Main Objectives of this research are (1) to find out the types of language style in cosmetics advertisement (2) to find out the kinds of meaning of language style in cosmetics advertisement. The researcher used Martin Joos and Geoffrey Leech Theory. This research used qualitative research and use descriptive method to analyze the data. The finding in this research, there are two language style found in cosmetics advertisement (1) language style of casual and language style of intimate. The first is language style of casual there are eleven data. The second is language style of intimate there are five data. The researcher found language style of casual are the statements of advertisement in caption on instagram and the theye are have language usually use on daily. The language style of intimate that statement were the advertisement use the language just only community of cosmetic that language. (2) there are two kinds of meanings language style from seven meaning of language style in cosmetics advertisement. Those are conceptual meaning, and connotative meaning. Conceptual meaning there are three data, connotative meaning there are two data. The researcher found the conceptual meaning of language style that the meaning really from the language with meaning. The connotative meaning are the meaning not in the dictionary, its mean the meaning different with means

    Walking with the Earth: Intercultural Perspectives on Ethics of Ecological Caring

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    It is commonly believed that considering nature different from us, human beings (qua rational, cultural, religious and social actors), is detrimental to our engagement for the preservation of nature. An obvious example is animal rights, a deep concern for all living beings, including non-human living creatures, which is understandable only if we approach nature, without fearing it, as something which should remain outside of our true home. “Walking with the earth” aims at questioning any similar preconceptions in the wide sense, including allegoric-poetic contributions. We invited 14 authors from 4 continents to express all sorts of ways of saying why caring is so important, why togetherness, being-with each others, as a spiritual but also embodied ethics is important in a divided world

    In her own words: exploring the subjectivity of Freud’s ‘teacher’ Anna von Lieben

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    This project is inspired by Roy Porter (1985), who draws attention to the patient-shaped gap in medical history, and Rita Charon (2006), who emphasises the need to bring the patient’s narrative to the fore in the practice of medicine. The principal aim was to devise a means of accessing the lived experience of a patient who is no longer alive in order to gain an understanding of her narrative. Anna von Lieben was identified as a suitable subject as she wrote a substantial quantity of autopathographical poetry suitable for analysis and her status as Freud’s patient makes her a person of significant interest to the history of medicine. The poems were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), an idiographic and inductive method of qualitative research, based on Heideggerian hermeneutic phenomenology, which explores the lived experience of individuals and is committed to understanding the first-person perspective from the third-person position. The main findings from the IPA study reveal that Anna experienced a prolonged period of malaise, starting in late adolescence which she believed to result, at least partly, from a traumatic experience which occurred at that time. The analysis also indicates that Anna suffered from deep and lasting feelings of guilt and shame. The discovery of additional family documentation enabled me to contextualise and add substance to the findings of the IPA study. Anna’s husband’s diaries in particular reveal that Anna: • had a severe and longstanding gynaecological disorder • suffered from severe morphinism • did not benefit from Freud’s treatment which seemed neither to ease her symptoms nor identify any cause • was treated in Paris, not by Jean-Martin Charcot as previously supposed, but by a French hydrotherapist, Theodore Keller, who appears to have become a person of considerable significance in her life. The above findings led me to investigate Anna’s comorbidities (gynaecological disease and morphinism) and to show how those could be responsible for much of the symptomatology identified by Freud as ‘hysteria’. I then explore the possibility that her psychotic-like experiences could have been iatrogenically induced by her treatment first by Keller and then by Freud. Finally, I propose a fourfold set of hypotheses as an alternative to Freud’s diagnosis of hysteria

    Auggie: Encouraging Effortful Communication through Handcrafted Digital Experiences

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    Digital communication is often brisk and automated. From auto-completed messages to "likes," research has shown that such lightweight interactions can affect perceptions of authenticity and closeness. On the other hand, effort in relationships can forge emotional bonds by conveying a sense of caring and is essential in building and maintaining relationships. To explore effortful communication, we designed and evaluated Auggie, an iOS app that encourages partners to create digitally handcrafted Augmented Reality (AR) experiences for each other. Auggie is centered around crafting a 3D character with photos, animated movements, drawings, and audio for someone else. We conducted a two-week-long field study with 30 participants (15 pairs), who used Auggie with their partners remotely. Our qualitative findings show that Auggie participants engaged in meaningful effort through the handcrafting process, and felt closer to their partners, although the tool may not be appropriate in all situations. We discuss design implications and future directions for systems that encourage effortful communication.Comment: To appear at the 25th ACM Conference On Computer-Supported Cooperative Work And Social Computing (CSCW '22). 25 page

    Managing global virtual teams in the London FinTech industry

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    Today, the number of organisations that are adopting virtual working arrangements has exploded, and the London FinTech industry is no exception. During recent years, FinTech companies have increasingly developed virtual teams as a means of connecting and engaging geographically dispersed workers, lowering costs, and enabling greater speed and adaptability. As the first study in the United Kingdom regarding global virtual team management in the FinTech industry, this DBA research seeks answers to the question, “What makes for the successful management of a global virtual team in the London FinTech industry?”. Straussian grounded-theory method was chosen as this qualitative approach lets participants have their own voice and offers some flexibility. It also allows the researcher to have preconceived ideas about the research undertaking. The research work makes the case for appreciating the voice of people with lived experiences. Ten London-based FinTech Managers with considerable experience running virtual teams agreed to take part in this study. These Managers had spent time working at large, household-name firms with significant global reach, and one had recently become founder and CEO of his own firm, taking on clients and hiring contract staff from around the world. At least eight of the other participants were senior ‘Heads’ of various technology teams and one was a Managing Director working at a ‘Big Four’ consultancy. They had all (and many still did) spent years running geographically distributed teams with members as far away as Pacific Asia and they were all keen to discuss that breadth of experience and the challenges they faced. Results from these in-depth interviews suggested that there are myriad reasons for a global virtual team, from providing 24 hour, follow-the-sun service to locating the most cost-effective resources with the highest skills. It also confirmed that there are unique challenges to virtual management and new techniques are required to help navigate virtual managers through them. Managing a global virtual team requires much more than the traditional management competencies. Based on discussion with the respondents, a set of practical recommendations for global virtual team management was developed and covered a wide range of issues related to recruitment and selection, team building, developing standard operating procedures, communication, motivation, performance management, and building trust
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