574 research outputs found

    Governor Jack : from the announcer\u27s booth to the governor\u27s office

    Get PDF
    This study attempted to present a history of Arizona broadcaster/politician Jack Williams and the role he played in shaping his community and state in the middle decades of the Twentieth Century. Williams\u27 broadcasting career spanned nearly 50 years and his political career carried him from school board president to 3-term governor of Arizona. To complete this study, primary sources were utilized including personal papers, state records, city records, newspapers, radio station documents, and interviews. Federal Radio Commission documents and Federal Communication Commission documents were also used. Scripts from Williams\u27 Yours Sincerely radio program on Radio Station KOY, Phoenix, Arizona, were analyzed as were political speeches from his campaigns for and terms as governor. Among the findings of this study was the direct relationship Williams\u27 radio broadcasting career had on his later becoming a political figure. Williams was found to be both a successful broadcaster and politician. It was concluded that much of Williams\u27 success as a broadcaster and as a politician could be attributed to his ability to adapt to change, his excellent managerial skills, and his keen business sense

    Tyrone K. Yates/John F. Kennedy Collection (MUM01774)

    Get PDF
    The Tyrone K. Yates/John F. Kennedy Collection consists largely of John F. Kennedy campaign material and memorabilia, as well as publications by and about the thirty-fifth president of the United States. It also includes a number of items related to other presidents and campaigns

    Nelson, Gaylord oral history interview

    Get PDF
    Gaylord Anton Nelson was born in Clear Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin on June 4, 1916. He served in the Army in World War II, then went to Madison, Wisconsin to practice law. After serving two terms as governor in Wisconsin (1959-1962), he was elected as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate in 1963 and served in that capacity until January 1981. He served on the Interior Committee, the Public Works Committee, the Small Businesses Committee, the Finance Committee, and the Labor Subcommittee. There he became interested in issues concerning the environment, and is credited with founding Earth Day in 1970. He opposed the Vietnam War. He later worked with the National Wilderness Society in Washington, D.C. He passed away July 3, 2005

    McEvoy, John oral history interview

    Get PDF
    John Thomas McEvoy was born in Council Bluffs, Iowa on April 9, 1937 and grew up in Omaha, Nebraska. His mother was a schoolteacher and later a homemaker. His father worked for the Federal Home Loan Bank System. He studied at and graduated from Creighton Preparatory School, Creighton College of Arts, and Creighton Law School in Omaha. He obtained a Master of Laws Degree from Georgetown University in 1964. He served three years as an officer in the Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps in the Office of the Army General Counsel and the Office of the Special Assistant to the Secretary of Defense. He served Senator Tom Dodd as a legislative assistant in 1965 and Senator Joseph Tydings as a legislative assistant from 1966 to 1968. He was Staff Director of the District of Columbia Committee in 1969 and 1970. He was Senator Muskie’s Administrative Assistant from 1971 until the presidential election of 1972. After practicing law for two years in Washington, he returned to Muskie’s staff as counsel to the Budget Committee in 1974. He became Staff Director of that Committee in 1977. He left at the end of 1980 to resume the practice of law until 1989, when he became Executive Director of the National Council of State Housing Agencies until his retirement in 2001

    Ransome, Lorelei oral history interview

    Get PDF
    Lorelei (Williams) Ransome was born in Alexandria, Virginia on June 26, 1939, one of nine children. Her father was both a civil servant and a private worker and her mother generally worked in their home. She grew up in Alexandria and attended Parker Gray School. After high school, she spent five years working in a department store while attending the ABC Business School. She then worked as a secretary in the Department of Labor for five years, until she was hired by the Senator Muskie Campaign Staff. When the 1968 campaign ended, she was hired to work on the Senate staff. After the 1972 campaign, she worked on the Intergovernmental Relations subcommittee with Al From as his personal secretary, and went with him to the Carter White House. When Carter was not reelected for a second term, she was hired by Reginald Gillian, who was a commissioner at the Interstate Commerce Commission. She worked for him for seven years until Gillian went to work for Senator Gallant, with whom she worked briefly. Then she returned to the Interstate Commerce Commission to work with Commissioner Lamboli, and then for Commissioner Gail McDonald. She worked for McDonald for thirty years until she retired

    An Overview of Positive Economic Rights in American Political Thought

    Get PDF
    Positive economic rights are entitlements an individual has for the state to provide for their basic needs. Though codified in international law, the existence of such rights remains deeply controversial in the United States. This thesis will explore the concept of positive economic rights throughout American history, beginning in the Colonial Period and ending with the recent revival of positive economic rights discourse since Bernie Sanders’ 2016 presidential campaign. The thesis will explore political literature related to positive rights, state duties to the poor, and positive liberty—a concept frequently invoked by advocates for positive economic rights. Through political literary analysis, I will argue that while the concept of state duties to the poor spans the full duration of American history, the framing of such duties in terms of individual rights is largely a product of the New Deal Era. The thesis will also explore arguments against positive economic rights, which began to intensify during the late 1960s. Though positive economic rights receded to the fringes of American discourse during the Reagan years, support for these rights appears to be making a comeback

    Berger, Samuel D. Sandy oral history interview

    Get PDF
    Samuel R. “Sandy” Berger is a native of New York, a graduate of Cornell University (1967) and Harvard Law School (1971). He served as a special assistant to Mayor John Lindsay of New York, legislative assistant to Senator Harold Hughes (D-IA), deputy director of the Policy Planning Staff, Department of State (1977-1980), deputy national security advisor (1993-1996) and national security advisor (1997-2000). He is now president of Stonebridge, an international affairs consulting firm

    Kelleher, Ed oral history interview

    Get PDF
    Edward Kelleher was born on June 27, 1941 in Bangor, Maine to James H. Kelleher and Florence L. (Soucy) Kelleher. He grew up in Bangor and graduated from John Bapst High School. He served in the Maine House of Representatives from 1968 to 1984

    American Rousseau: Barack Obama and the Social Contract

    Get PDF
    Article published in the Thurgood Marshall Law Review
    corecore