4,313 research outputs found

    Rwanda-- OAU to Investigate 1994 Genocide

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    Rwanda-- OAU to Investigate 1994 Genocide Source: Kigali Radio Rwanda in Englishhttps://digitalcommons.georgefox.edu/rawson_rwanda/1057/thumbnail.jp

    Can living through genocide lead to positive change?

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    After spending a year working at the Kigali Genocide Memorial Centre in Rwanda, Nottingham University’s Caroline Williamson presented the findings of her field research at LSE’s Africa Seminar Series. Looking at Rwandan women’s testimonies of the 1994 genocide, her project examines representations of positive identity change resulting from the trauma caused by the genocide, otherwise known as posttraumatic growth

    Promoting Reconciliation through Exhuming and Identifying Victims in the 1994 Rwandan Genocide

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    LESSONS FROM RWANDA

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    Before a recent visit to Rwanda, all that the country held for me, as with most people, was the spectre of genocide, war, poverty and starving children. My brief visit to the city of Kigali challenged my widely held assumptions about the country. Kigali was the epicentre of the genocide in Rwanda, where about one million people experienced murderous tyranny, within a space of 100 days, that wreaked havoc upon the country and left millions of people with untold losses and emotional scars. Rwanda is, indeed, an amazing example of a country rising from the ashes. My first encounter was on the Air Rwanda flight, where the in-flight magazine warns those entering the country to leave their plastic bags behind; no person would be allowed to pass through immigration and customs with plastic bags and wrappings. A plastic-bag-free country is one of Rwanda’s contributions to environmental conservation and saving the earth. And of course in stores, its paper bags all the way

    Promoting Reconciliation through Exhuming and Identifying Victims in the 1994 Rwandan Genocide

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    Drawing upon interviews conducted with 24 Kibuye-based survivors, as well as GOR officials from around Rwanda, the paper argues that survivors — while appreciative of any effort to memorialize the 1994 genocide — are negotiating psychological and spiritual distress as a result of their inability to definitively identify and rebury the remains of their missing loved ones with respect. This distress, in turn, makes it difficult for them to envision a stable future for their communitythat includes multi-ethnic collaboration. For this reason, the paper asserts that the international community, in collaboration with the GOR and survivor communities around Rwanda, should pursue new humanitarian exhumations. These exhumations should be mandated to positively identify the anonymous victims of the 1994 genocide and return any identified remains to their surviving families for reburial

    Voices of Women Entrepreneurs in Rwanda

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    This document presents voices of women entrepreneuers in Rwanda. Rwanda is recognized as a world leader in promoting gender equality and offers an encouraging example of how post-conflict countries can seize the reform momentum after conflict ends to support women's empowerment. Women entrepreneurs are a significant force in Rwanda's private sector. Yet inequalities persist. Available data indicate that women's share of business ownership decreases as the degree of formalization increases. Women entrepreneurs, especially successful businesswomen, are increasingly able to purchase or inherit land, and secure bank loans. Women in Rwanda perceive tax rates as a top business constraint. Women-owned businesses indicate the need for management and technical skills and better access to training facilities to grow their businesses. The report is informed by an in-depth legal and regulatory analysis, but also reflects the successes and challenges highlighted by the women interviewed

    Do we understand life after genocide? Centre and periphery in the knowledge construction in/on Rwanda

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    A reflection on the existing “constructs of knowledge” on Rwanda reveals that these are rife with contradictory assertions and images. We therefore map “the frontier of knowledge construction”, the centre(s) of society where not only policy is made, but where knowledge is actively construed, managed and controlled. We identify a discrepancy between “image” and “reality” in/on post-genocide Rwanda. We do so to be able to address the fundamental question: “do we really understand life after genocide?” We argue that crucial variables remain un- or under-explored due to an at times active interference in the scientific construction of knowledge; an overall cultivation of the aesthetics of progress and a culturally specific communication code. We analyze the “mise-en-scène” (stage-setting) of Rwanda and argue for greater attention to the “mise-en-sens” (meaning-giving and overall direction). We stress the need to carry out a adopt a bottom-up perspective in order to capture the voices of ordinary people.
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