405,612 research outputs found

    Can Food Stamps Do More to Improve Food Choices? An Economic Perspective

    Get PDF
    Food stamp recipients, like other Americans, struggle with nutrition problems associated with choice of foods, as well as amounts. This series of Economic Information Bulletins compiles evidence to help answer the question of whether the Food Stamp Program can do more to improve the food choices of participants. It examines the role of affordability and price of healthful foods in influencing food choices and the likely success of any policy targeted at changing food choices through food stamp bonuses or restrictions. It also examines other approaches to changing food choices, including nutrition education and potential strategies drawn from behavioral economics literature. Meaningful improvements in the diets of food stamp recipients will likely depend on a combination of many tactics. Measuring the effect of any policy change on food choices and health outcomes remains a challenge.Food Stamp Program, food consumption, food prices, food expenditures, nutrition education, behavioral economics, food choices, diet, health, fruits and vegetables, Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Program, FANRP, ERS, USDA, Agricultural and Food Policy, Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Institutional and Behavioral Economics,

    The expected effects of the National School Nutrition Programme: Evidence from a case study in Cape Town, Western Cape

    Get PDF
    Magister Artium - MASchool feeding programmes have become a worldwide poverty reduction strategy that are designed to enhance human capital, i.e. nutrition and education. In South Africa, the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) began in 1994 and it was designed to enhance learning capacity, to support nutrition education in schools and to promote school gardens. The purpose of this study is to explore whether the expected impacts (nutrition and education) of the NSNP in Cape Town have been achieved. The study used the theory of change as an attempt to explore the expected impacts of the programme and it involved a qualitative research approach. The data was collected using semi-structured interviews. Note-taking and observations of non-verbal behaviour techniques were also used to capture any relevant information. The respondents were 4 school principals, 4 teacher coordinators, 4 food handlers, 4 members of the School Governing Body and one staff member from the Department of Basic Education (DBE) of the Western Cape. Findings from the global literature show that the impacts of school feeding programmes are quite mixed (between nutrition and education). This study has found that the NSNP in Cape Town has improved food security, i.e. reduced short-term hunger (but not necessarily nutrition) and it gave energy to the learners that helped them to actively participate in learning. It also eliminated some negative class behaviours and it functioned as an additional meal to some poor learners. On the education front, it enhanced school attendance, class participation and possibly improved learner performance. However, the programme has also experienced some challenges, i.e. the food quality and quantity, targeting system (the quintile system) that excluded some poor learners from receiving NSNP meals and food gardens were not producing sufficient food because they were small and poorly maintained. This study recommends that rigorous impact evaluation of the NSNP in Cape Town is required in order to address the challenges that were identified as well as to enhance the programme so that it can achieve the desired impacts

    USDA's Healthy Eating Index and Nutrition Information

    Get PDF
    A comprehensive model is developed to measure the extent that nutrition knowledge and diet-health awareness, among other factors, influence an individual's Healthy Eating Index (HEI), USDA's measure of overall diet quality. This is the first study that rigorously attempts to examine variation in the index across population groups by controlling for personal and household characteristics and nutrition information levels, as well as test for the endogeneity of nutrition information. Results indicate that one's level of nutrition information has an important influence on one's HEI and that nutrition information and the HEI are simultaneously determined. Other factors explaining variations in HEI's across individuals are income and education levels, race, ethnicity, and age. Evidence supports the hypothesis that higher education promotes more healthful food choices through better acquisition and use of health information.diet quality, Healthy Eating Index, nutrient demand, nutrition knowledge, health inputs, health production, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,

    Breastfeeding Promotion Research: The ES/WIC Nutrition Education Initiative and Economic Considerations

    Get PDF
    Educating low-income women about the advantages of breastfeeding their babies increases the number who breastfeed. This report summarizes the results of four projects that focused primarily on promoting breastfeeding, which is considered to be the most healthful and beneficial feeding method for most infants. Research has shown that breastfeeding improves the general health, growth, and development of infants and significantly reduces the risk of several health problems both during early life and in later years. Lower income women have been less likely to breastfeed than higher income women. One step the USDA has taken to promote breastfeeding is the ES/WIC Nutrition Education Initiative. This combines the strengths of two nutrition programs for low-income families, the Cooperative Extension System's Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program and the Food and Nutrition Service's Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. This report shows that breastfeeding education before delivery increases the initiation of breastfeeding among low-income women. The results also indicate that breastfeeding support soon after delivery increases the duration of breastfeeding.Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,

    Nutrition Education in Food Pantries: Perceptions of Pantry Personnel towards Implementation

    Get PDF
    Extension programming can be effective at delivering nutrition education to food pantry clients. This study aimed to understand the perceptions of food pantry personnel towards nutrition education. A mixed methods survey was administered to food pantry personnel (n=53). Most (62.3%) reported their food pantry was church-affiliated, and few (22.6%) reported any Extension collaboration. Qualitative themes included perceptions that nutrition education was resource intensive, clients were not interested in nutrition education, and differing attitudes towards nutrition education. When working with food pantries, Extension should educate personnel about the importance of nutrition education, offer resources, and facilitate programming

    Improving women's and children's nutrition in sub-Saharan Africa : an issues paper

    Get PDF
    The main sources of malnutrition in Africa, as elsewhere, are inadequate food intake, excessive disease, maternal malnutrition, and deleterious food and health behavior. The authors review several successful innovative approaches to addressing nutrition problems in Africa: the Iringa Nutrition Program in Tanzania, the Zimbabwe Children's Supplementary Feeding Program, the Zaire Weaning Foods Processing Program, and the Senegal Growth Promotion Program. They identify the lessons from these programs, including the need: (a) to involve the community actively in program development; (b) for training in nutrition at all levels, from doctor to village health worker; (c) for strong growth monitoring and nutrition education components; (d) for close supervision, including regular supervisory visits to villages and health huts, discussions with clients, and observations; and (e) for a variety of institutional and financing mechanisms. Africa's nutrition problems require many of the same services as problems elsewhere - growth monitoring, nutrition education, targeted feeding, and food fortification. Africa shares the universal need for good training, management, communications, and information systems. But new and innovative institutional mechanisms are needed to address Africa's nutrition problems. Each country must look for its own institutional strengths and weaknesses in developing nutrition programs.Early Child and Children's Health,Nutrition,Agricultural Knowledge&Information Systems,Primary Education,Health Monitoring&Evaluation

    Assessing development strategies and Africa's food and nutrition security

    Get PDF
    "On average, a typical developing country in Africa is assisted by about 30 aid institutions in the implementation of development strategies, yet Africa is still far from achieving food and nutrition security. Adequate access to food that is necessary for food security must be complemented with provision of health services, education, sanitary environments, and safe water sources, among other resources, to achieve nutrition security." from TextDevelopment assistance ,Food security Africa ,Nutrition Security ,Health services ,Water quality ,Sanitation ,Development strategies ,

    The Decline in Consumer Use of Food Nutrition Labels, 1995-2006

    Get PDF
    This report examines changes in consumers’ use of nutrition labels on food packages between 1995-96 and 2005-06. The analysis finds that, although a majority of consumers report using nutrition labels when buying food, use has declined for most label components, including the Nutrition Facts panel and information about calories, fats, cholesterol, and sodium. By contrast, use of fiber information has increased. The decline in label use is particularly marked for the cohort of adults less than 30 years old.Nutrition Facts panel, Nutrition Labeling and Education Act, nutrition label use, Diet and Health Knowledge Survey, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Agricultural and Food Policy, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Marketing,

    An Exploratory Study of Food and Nutrition Instruction in Australian Primary Schools

    Get PDF
    Many Australian children have unhealthy dietary behaviours. These unhealthy dietary behaviours have been linked to rising rates of childhood obesity. Food and nutrition education plays an important role in shaping children’s dietary behaviours and schools have been identified as ideal location for such education to occur. Despite recognition of the importance of food and nutrition education evidence suggests adequate time is not being allocated to food and nutrition education in primary schools. To effectively educate, support, and encourage teachers to include food and nutrition education in their programs, it is critical to understand the influences that enable or constrain their current instructional practices. The international literature and a number of small exploratory studies in Australia point to possible influences, including poor food and nutrition related knowledge and lack of appropriate teaching resources. The research presented in this thesis aimed to investigate the influences on Australian primary school teachers’ food and nutrition instructional practices at the intrapersonal, interpersonal, organisational, community, and policy levels. The study utilised a convergent mixed-methods design, applying both quantitative and qualitative methods to explore influences on teachers’ food and nutrition instructional practices. The quantitative phase of the research cross-sectionally surveyed primary school teachers’ (n=271) food and nutrition related attitudes and beliefs, knowledge, self-efficacy, and instructional practices. The qualitative phase of the research used in-depth semi-structured interviews (n=18) to explore teachers’ experiences and perceptions of food and nutrition education, including enablers and barriers to food and nutrition instruction. Primary school teachers, on the whole, had positive attitudes and beliefs towards food and nutrition education. Teachers were motivated to teach food and nutrition content because of the positive influence they believed it could have on children’s health outcomes, wellbeing, and learning. Furthermore, teachers had moderately high levels of food and nutrition knowledge and high levels of self-efficacy to teach food and nutrition content. The likelihood of teaching food and nutrition content increased the more a teacher felt prepared to teach such content. Furthermore, the number of hours spent teaching food and nutrition content appeared to be positively associated with self-efficacy to teach food and nutrition content. Despite teachers’ positive attitudes and beliefs, moderately high food and nutrition knowledge, and self-efficacy, the number of hours spent teaching food and nutrition was limited. Eighty-five percent (84.8%) of the teachers surveyed reported they currently taught, had taught in the past or planned to teach food and nutrition content in the future, however over half of these teachers (51.8%) taught five hours or less of food and nutrition content per year. Barriers to teaching food and nutrition content included: a crowded curriculum, pressure to prioritise ‘core subjects’, and limited access to appropriate resources. Enablers of food and nutrition instruction included: support from school leadership and parents, reinforcement of food and nutrition messages through school policies and planning, and embedding food and nutrition education into daily routines. The findings of this thesis highlight the importance of a multilevel approach to supporting food and nutrition education in primary schools. While teachers must be supported at an individual level to develop food and nutrition related knowledge and self-efficacy, it is essential to reduce the barriers that constrain teachers’ food and nutrition instructional practices at the school, community, and policy levels. By acknowledging and addressing the range of influences that shape teachers FNIP, a multilevel approach to supporting food and nutrition instruction has the potential to embed food and nutrition education in primary schools and in so doing, support children to develop healthy dietary behaviours for life

    The Influence of Endogenous Nutrition Knowledge on Consumers’ Willingness-To-Pay for Grass-Fed Beef

    Get PDF
    The relationship between nutrition knowledge and consumers’ food behavior has been debated for years. This may be partially attributed to the difficulty introduce by endogeneity of nutrition knowledge in econometric modeling. Using grass-fed beef as a vehicle, this paper investigates the impacts of consumers’ nutrition knowledge on their willingness to pay by accommodating the endogeneity problem using instrumental variable approach. Our results suggest that consumers’ nutrition knowledge significantly influences their willingness to pay for grass-fed beef. Gender and education are influential factors of consumers’ nutrition knowledge level.Nutrition Knowledge, Endogeneity, Willingness to Pay, Agribusiness, Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy, Marketing,
    corecore