288,347 research outputs found

    You Can’t “Nudge” Nuggets: An Investigation of Late Night Dining With Behavioral Economics Interventions

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    A mixed-methods approach was used to evaluate and improve the “Late-Night Dining” options in a university dining hall. Surveys assessed student desires around Late-Night offerings, and evaluated students’ habits and motivations during Late-Night. Two interventions based on the principles of behavioral economics were implemented to see if students could be “nudged” into making healthier choices. In the first, a “veggie-heavy” entrĂ©e was added at the beginning of the entrĂ©e line, so that students would substitute a healthier entrĂ©e for the less healthy alternatives. In the second, a healthy snack-food bar was set up to cater to students who didn’t want to stand in the long entrĂ©e line. Data on food choice was collected during the interventions. Survey responses showed significant differences in the reasons females and males utilized Late-Night Dining (p Following our interventions, Dining Services continued to offer the healthy snack bar, and veggie-heavy entrĂ©es were included in the rotation of Late-Night entrĂ©e options

    Enhancing Dining Experiences through Emotional Tableware Design

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    Positive dining experiences can improve both physical and psychological health. Eating with people and eating slowly can facilitate one’s experience and behavior during the process, owing to the unexpected information from their senses and the surrounding environment. Tableware is a very important bridge between people and food. People get food, share food, and serve food while dining. Therefore, the tableware based on emotional design can to a certain extent affect people\u27s dining behavior and dining experience. This paper firstly introduces the reasons why people are getting hard to get a positive dining experience, and the importance of dining experiences. Then, the author analyzes the factors that influence dining experiences and explains how emotional tableware design to enhance dining experiences by increasing sensory stimulation, interactions, and emotional resonance of users. Finally, based on the three levels of emotional design theory which are visceral level, behavioral level, and reflective level, the author proposes that the integration of sensory stimulation, interaction, and narrative can help people enjoy their positive dining experience

    New Nordic upmarket bistros and the practical configurations of artful dining

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    This paper analyzes the blurring boundaries between food and art in the West by examining the contemporary field of upmarket dining. The study adopts a practice theoretical view, conceptualizes artful dining as a large-scale cultural formation (?teleoaffective formation?), and explores the configurations of artful dining in the context of New Nordic Upmarket Bistros (NNUBs). Based on blog texts, chef interview and participant observation at a Finnish NNUB, the study demonstrates how the local restaurant enthusiasts adopted and adjusted artful dining in a specific, ?everyday? context of upmarket dining. The study presents dining at NNUBs as one of the many practices that have substantially expanded the art-oriented dining ideals beyond modernist cuisine. It discusses artful dining within the contemporary (gourmet) food culture and encourages further diversification of approaches in studies examining artful dining and the intersection of food and art.Peer reviewe

    Student Attitudes and Perceptions Regarding Food Waste at UNH Dining Halls

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    UNH works in the hospitality sector of businesses. Over the years, food waste has grown to become an alarmingly increasing problem for both the environment and businesses operating in the sector. While UNH has many food waste mitigation efforts, there is still an opportunity for both the dining halls and students to work together to help reduce food waste. A survey was performed and analyzed which reveals that many students who frequented the dining halls are willing to better adjust their dining practices to help mitigate food waste. However, this is contingent on the dining halls presenting the information of increasing food waste to students to better inspire change. Outside of the dining halls and across the various colleges, the College of Health and Human Services reveals to be a strong potential start for a food waste campaign to be unveiled and targeted towards, as the college comprises many patrons who strongly agree with efforts to mitigate food waste

    Consumers’ Reactions to Sanitation in Casual Dining, Quick-Service, and Fine Dining Restaurants

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    Consumers’ concern about food safety, sanitation, and health has increased since food-borne illnesses still frequently occur in the US. This article explored consumers’ perceptions, emotions, and behavioral intention about the sanitation of the physical environment in three different restaurant settings, casual dining, quick-service, and fine dining restaurants. Disgust was the most strongly felt negative emotion, but no significant differences were found for negative emotional reactions to dirty conditions among the three types of restaurants. Positive emotional reactions were significantly different among the restaurant types. Behavioral intention was also significantly different among the three restaurant types as a reaction to dirty food. The findings help restaurant owners and managers understand how consumers feel and react to “dirty” food, service staff, or dining room tables in casual, quick-service and fine dining restaurant

    Healthy eating away-from-home: effects of dining occasion and the number of menu items

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    Consumers are reported to be increasingly concerned about their health. Nonetheless, consumers show different attitudes toward food at home and away from home. In particular, consumers tend to shy away from healthy food items when dining on special occasions. This study is the first to look into the number of healthy menu items provided to consumers during dining occasions. The impacts of two independent variables (dining occasion: normal vs. special; number of healthy items: limited vs. extended) on consumers’ dining menu selection was examined among female university students. The results of this study indicate that both dining occasion and the number of healthy items offered could influence consumers’ food selection independently. Although consumers are more likely to choose unhealthy items while dining’on special occasions, offering more healthy items would increase the probability of healthy eating. This study also offers some insights into the food categories and cooking methods favored by consumers. Further studies should explore other potential foods that would enhance the selection of healthy options by consumers

    How are University\u27s Handling Dining Hall Food Waste-UNL Study

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    One of the biggest challenges with the American food system is that 30-40% of our food is wasted every year (EPA, 2018). There are many reasons why food is being wasted around Universities campuses, and there are many ways to divert that wasted material from the landfill. In 2016, a zero-food waste event was held in Harper dining hall, and they found around 70 pounds a night just from a dinner rush. The main objective is aimed to find out how the University of Nebraska Lincoln (UNL) handles their dining hall food waste. This study will look at what Big TEN Universities do with their food waste. The main question is what are the best option(s) for universities that handle dining hall food waste on a large scale. The Universities will be viewed through the lens of the Food Recovery Hierarchy, which contains the most preferred method of source reduction, donating to non-profits, feed the animals, industrial uses, composting and least preferred landfill/incineration (see image, page 8). This study will be done using a systematic approach, meaning it will be set up so it can be replicated easily. Specifically, will focus on Universities’ ideas and practices regarding dining hall food waste. In addition, to the research on each Big TEN University, a survey will be sent to the Universities’ dining hall management, as well as interviews with some of the cooks in UNL’s dining halls. The results show that most of the Big TEN Universities reuse their food waste by reducing first, then donating, composting or anaerobic digestors. The surveys show that these Universities are highly aware of the issue, and spend lots of money and time to reduce their footprint. As for UNL, they compare well to other Universities, and they have the resources to handle dining hall food waste on a larger scale. What UNL could do is to track their food waste to get an idea of quantity, and create basic infrastructure and supplies to compost. In addition, they could Increase donation when possible, and think about anaerobic digestors options off campus that will digest the food waste for fertilizer

    EXPERT OPINION AND CUISINE REPUTATION IN THE MARKET FOR RESTAURANT MEALS

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    As food is an experience good, the market for restaurant meals is a market where the cost of acquiring information regarding quality is relatively high. In such markets consumers often turn to reputation measures to guide purchase decisions. As Australia does not have a longstanding cuisine style of its own, and given Australia has been open to substantial immigration inflows since federation, it represents an especially appropriate market to study regarding the impact of individual restaurant reputation and collective cuisine reputation on meal prices. The following study uses the hedonic price approach to investigate the implicit price of individual reputation indicators, cuisine type reputation indicators, and other objective indicators in the market for restaurant meals. The empirical findings presented suggest that both individual restaurant reputation and cuisine type reputation are important. Other important factors are shown to include the quality of the restaurant wine list, the availability of private dining rooms, and whether or not there is an outdoor dining option.Expert Opinion, Food, Hedonic Pricing, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,

    Expert opinion and cuisine reputation in the market for restaurant meals

    Get PDF
    As food is an experience good, the market for restaurant meals is a market where the cost of acquiring information regarding quality is relatively high. In such markets consumers often turn to reputation measures to guide purchase decisions. As Australia does not have a longstanding cuisine style of its own, and given Australia has been open to substantial immigration inflows since federation, it represents an especially appropriate market to study regarding the impact of individual restaurant reputation and collective cuisine reputation on meal prices. The following study uses the hedonic price approach to investigate the implicit price of individual reputation indicators, cuisine type reputation indicators, and other objective indicators in the market for restaurant meals. The empirical findings presented suggest that both individual restaurant reputation and cuisine type reputation are important. Other important factors are shown to include the quality of the restaurant wine list, the availability of private dining rooms, and whether or not there is an outdoor dining option.Expert Opinion, Food, Hedonic Pricing, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, D12, R22,
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