8,082 research outputs found

    Factors Influencing Breastfeeding in a Hospital Setting

    Get PDF
    Breastfeeding is promoted across the globe as the optimum method of infant feeding (World Health Organization, WHO, 2003). Though there is a plethora of published benefits of breastfeeding for baby and mother, breastfeeding rates are below the national goal of 75% for Healthy People 2010 during early postpartum and considerably lower at six months and at one year (Li et al., 2005; HHS, 2000). Arkansas is significantly below the national average and goals, with only 60% of mothers ever breastfeeding versus 74% nationally (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, 2008). To meet these goals nationally and on a state level, it is important to examine the factors associated with a mother’s choice of breastfeeding. Part I of this study examined the relationship between breastfeeding at discharge and the mother’s initial feeding preference, method of delivery, time of birth, birth-to-breast time, and any formula supplementation. It also identified which factor had the strongest relationship with rates of breastfeeding upon hospital departure. Part II of this study examined hospital nurses’ attitudes, knowledge, and confidence about breastfeeding instruction as related to their self-reported assistance with and promotion of breastfeeding in the past year. Results: Exclusive breastfeeding at discharge was related to type and time of delivery, birth–to-breast time, and use of formula supplementation. Knowledge and attitude scores did not yield significant correlations with the assistance and promotion of breastfeeding, though a weak positive correlation was noted between confidence in breastfeeding promotion and the nurses\u27 assistance and promotion of breastfeeding

    Predictors of breastfeeding duration among women in Kuwait: results of a prospective cohort study

    Get PDF
    The purposes of this paper are to report the prevalence of breastfeeding to six months among women in Kuwait and to determine the factors that are associated with the duration of breastfeeding. A cohort of 373 women recruited from maternity wards in four hospitals in Kuwait city were followed from birth to 26 weeks postpartum. The association of any and full breastfeeding duration and predictor variables were explored using multivariate Cox’s proportional hazards models. At six months, 39% of all infants were receiving some breast milk and only 2% of infants had been fully breastfed to 26 weeks. Women born in other Arab countries were less likely to discontinue breastfeeding than women born in Kuwait. Other factors positively associated with breastfeeding duration were level of maternal education, higher parity, infant being demand fed in hospital and a preference for breastfeeding on the part of the infant’s father and maternal grandmother. The introduction of a pacifier before four weeks of age and the mother intending to return to work by six months were negatively associated with duration. These findings present a number of opportunities for prolonging breastfeeding duration in Kuwait

    Contemporary Women’s Adaptation to Motherhood: The First 3 to 6 Weeks Postpartum

    Get PDF
    A better understanding of the process of adaptation to motherhood should enhance nurses’ ability to prepare women for the transition to motherhood and to provide care following childbirth. Knowledge about women’s adaptation to motherhood was developed primarily from the 1960s to the 1990s. Cesarean birthing was a special focus of research throughout the late 1970s and the 1980s, followed by functional status, and more recently, depression and stress associated with birth and postpartum. Adaptation to motherhood in the context of the early 21st century has received limited attention in nursing research, creating an assumption that the process of adaptation is universal and context-free rather than evolving within the life and societal context of women across generations. Although becoming and being a mother has been described as a normative transition rather than a stressor by some, knowledge development about adaptation to motherhood also has been constrained by the limited use of a unified perspective of transition as a process of adaptation. Therefore, the purposes of this exploratory study were to describe contemporary women’s physical, emotional, functional, and social adaptation to motherhood and to examine the relations of selected demographic and perinatal variables to adaptation to motherhood in the first 3 to 6 weeks of the postpartum

    Home and community based parenting support programmes and interventions: report of Workpackage 2 of the DataPrev project

    Get PDF
    The last decade has witnessed an increasing interest in the promotion of mental health and wellbeing because of its importance for health and social functioning at the individual level and for the social and economic wellbeing of societies. Recent research from a range of disciplines has highlighted the importance of the quality of the parent-child relationships and parenting on children‟s emotional and social development, and on adult mental health and wellbeing. Intervention studies involving children of all age groups have shown that if parenting can be influenced for the better outcomes can be changed. The DataPrev project was funded by the 6th Framework of the European Community Research Programme under Policy-Orientated Research with the aim of establishing a database of evidence-based programmes in Europe that promote mental health and wellbeing and prevent mental illness throughout the life course. This is the report of the Workpackage 2 describing the international evidence base on programmes to support parenting, including home and community based programmes

    Antepartum, Intrapartum, and Postpartum Predictors of Readiness for Hospital Discharge and Post-Discharge Outcomes

    Get PDF
    Pregnancy and childbirth are significant events in the lives of women and their families where the discharge decision-making process involves careful judgment in projecting the mom\u27s ability to cope with care needs after discharge. Research examining the predictors of discharge readiness and post-discharge outcomes taking into consideration antepartum and intrapartum factors influencing readiness for discharge has not been conducted. The purpose of this study was to explore the antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum predictors of readiness for hospital discharge and post-discharge outcomes. The Adaptation to Transitions conceptual framework consisted of conceptually-related variables was developed and guided the descriptive correlational repeated measure design study. A purposive sample of English and Spanish-speaking postpartum mothers who experiences a vaginal or cesarean birth of a healthy infant (N = 185) completed demographic, quality of discharge teaching, and readiness for hospital discharge questionnaires prior to discharge. Four weeks post-discharge, participants completed a coping difficulty questionnaire and the quality of discharge teaching questionnaire to compare pre- and post- hospital perceptions of teaching. A final model was computed with all significant predictors for readiness for hospital discharge and post-discharge coping difficulty. Infant length of stay, the delivery of education, and the difference between educational content received and the education content needed, were the significant predictor variables accounting for 42% of the variance in readiness for hospital discharge (R2=0.44, R2adj =0.42, F(8,176) = 17.5, p \u3c 0.001). Participants with less than high school education and the difference between educational content received and needed were the two significant predictor variables accounting for 28% of the variance in post-discharge coping difficulty (R2=0.33, R2adj =0.28, F(6,60) = 5.1, p \u3c 0.001). Nurses\u27 skill in the delivery of education, the educational content received, and the post-discharge coping difficulty were predictive of utilization of post-discharge health care services. A statistically significant difference in the quality of discharge teaching between pre- and post- hospital discharge was also noted. The relationship between quality of discharge teaching, readiness for discharge, and post-discharge coping and utilization provides evidence of nurses\u27 critical role in educating patients and families to facilitate a smooth transition home after childbirth

    Breastfeeding Influencing Factors in Thai Adolescent Mothers

    Get PDF
    Background: Breastfeeding is well established as the optimal method for ensuring healthy infant nutrition. However, many adolescents remain unaware of the role of breastfeeding. Adolescent mothers continue to have the lowest rate of breastfeeding in many countries including Thailand, with only 17% of Thai adolescent mothers continuing to breastfed at 6 months postpartum. Objective: Examine factors influencing breastfeeding behaviors in adolescent mothers, particularly those in Thailand. Methods: This dissertation project involved two research studies focusing on breastfeeding influencing factors in adolescent mothers. The first study was an integrative review of 22 articles published in 2000-2012. The findings revealed that personal factors appear to be the most important to the decision to initiate and maintain breastfeeding for adolescent mothers. Perceptions of cultural expectations also influence breastfeeding decisions and behaviors. Additionally, infant factors seem to be considerations in breastfeeding duration for the adolescent mother. The second study used a prospective cohort design to explore personal, social, cultural, and infant factors that explain and predict breastfeeding initiation and maintenance at 4 weeks postpartum in Thai adolescent mothers. The sample of 96 adolescent mothers was recruited at two prenatal clinics in Thailand. There were three time points for data collection; the initial visit was completed in the prenatal period, the second visit was within 48 hours postpartum, and the third was at 4 weeks postpartum. Instruments were the Iowa Infant feeding Attitude Scale (IIFAS), Breastfeeding Influencing Factor Assessment (BIFA), Hughes Breast-Feeding Support Scale (HBSS), Pictorial Assessment of Temperament (PAT), Vulnerable Baby Scale (VBS), and Parenting Sense of Competence Scale (PSOC), all of which were translated into the Thai language. Results: Personal, social, and cultural factors were significantly correlated with breastfeeding initiation and were significant positive predictors of exclusive breastfeeding duration. Infant temperament was a significant negative predictor of exclusive breastfeeding duration. Maternal competence was also positively correlated with duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Conclusion: Facilitating the support mothers receive from their personal support systems is important to breastfeeding duration and maternal competence in the postpartum period. Enhancing exclusive breastfeeding and maternal competence provides a supportive environment for new adolescent mothers to develop their maternal role

    Maternal and professional identity change during the transition to motherhood

    Get PDF
    Becoming a mother derails many women’s chances for career progression. One reason for this is that women leave organisations when they become mothers, or reduce their working hours. Another reason is that people within the organisation start to view them as less career-orientated as a result of being mothers. At the core of this issue is that who a woman is – her identity – is being redefined in the transition to motherhood, by herself and by those around her. But, little is known about how her professional identity develops during the transition to motherhood, or whether its development is related to her growing maternal identity. This paper, therefore, presents a systematic review of the literature concerning changes in maternal and professional identities, as well as the relationship between them. Based on the evidence, this review concludes that although the development of maternal identity has been well documented in the literature, little is known about how a woman’s professional identity develops, as she becomes a mother. Suggestions for further research and practice are discussed

    Maternal self-efficacy in newborn care: influence of maternal variables

    Get PDF
    Aim: To analyze the influence of sociodemographic, obstetric, childbirth, and breastfeeding variables on maternal self-efficacy in newborn care. Design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Methods: The study was conducted in three hospital units in the Northern region of Portugal, with a non-probabilistic sample composed of 340 women recruited at postnatal wards on the day of hospital discharge. A questionnaire including the mother’s sociodemographic, obstetric, childbirth, and breastfeeding data was used. For the analysis of maternal self-efficacy in newborn care, the Scale of Perceived Parental Self-Efficacy in Child Care was used. The scale is a 20-item self-report instrument developed to identify women with low levels of self-efficacy in newborn care. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for data analysis. Results: Significant differences concerning maternal self-efficacy in newborn care were found with regard to level of education and parity, with multiparous women and women with lower levels of education presenting higher levels of self-efficacy in newborn care. Conclusion: The analysis of these variables could be valuable in building new knowledge to support the development of an action model that would allow at-risk women to be highly confident in their parenting role.info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersio
    corecore