399,771 research outputs found

    Print or Perish? Authors’ Attitudes Toward Electronic-Only Publication of Law Journals

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    An increasing number of U.S. law journals post at least current issues in freely accessible PDF and (in some cases) HTML formats on their web sites. Yet, perhaps without exception, the journals that make their articles freely available on their websites also continue to publish print issues in the face of declining subscription numbers, and law libraries\u27 growing disinterest in collecting and preserving journals in print. As universities reduce staff, freeze open positions, eliminate salary increases, and cut library budgets, why have law schools continued to subsidize print publication of journals that are accessible in electronic formats? Among the reasons suggested for this is the possible impact on a journals reputation and ability to attract authors if it moved to electronic-only publication. This paper reports on the results of a survey of law journal authors\u27 attitudes toward electronic-only law journals

    How to find journals by title

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    Showing students how to access electronic and print journals using the Library's journals A-Z lis

    Hidden Under a Bushel? Evangelical Journals in an Era of Web-Based Communications

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    Evangelicals face significant obstacles as they seek to make their publications accessible to potential readers. This study measures the extent to which evangelical scholarly journals have made their contents available in electronic form. Thirty-five journals – all active, refereed, evangelical in perspective, and published in English – were chosen for analysis. Two serials management tools and individual journal Web sites provided data regarding electronic accessibility. Twenty-six of the journals are available in some electronic form – most commonly in one or more aggregated databases. Evangelical information professionals could play a significant role in helping to make additional evangelical journal content available electronically

    The Durham Statement Two Years Later: Open Access in the Law School Journal Environment

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    The Durham Statement on Open Access to Legal Scholarship, drafted by a group of academic law library directors, was promulgated in February 2009. It calls for two things: (1) open access publication of law school–published journals; and (2) an end to print publication of law journals, coupled with a commitment to keeping the electronic versions available in “stable, open, digital formats.” The two years since the Statement was issued have seen increased publication of law journals in openly available electronic formats, but little movement toward all-electronic publication. This article discusses the issues raised by the Durham Statement, the current state of law journal publishing, and directions forward

    An online electronic journal for teaching purposes

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    Electronic journals are rapidly increasing in importance as a means of communication, but there is, as yet, little available in the way of training in their production or use. An experimental online electronic journal has therefore been established to provide such training. The journal is provided on the World Wide Web as a distributed activity: in the recently concluded evaluation phase, issues were produced at three nodes ‐ Loughborough University, City University and the University of South Australia. The students involved in the evaluation have been on courses in information, library and publishing studies at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. The main training topics are: accessing electronic journals and evaluating interfaces; refereeing and editing; evaluating layout and design. The results of the evaluation show that this simulation approach is highly acceptable to students. It also has the value of highlighting areas where students are uncertain, or experience problems in handling the material. Student reactions to, and comments on, electronic journals appear to parallel those among actual users of such journals. Hence the training activity throws some light on the general problems that can be expected in making the transition from printed to electronic journals. As a result of the evaluation activities reported here, an online training package is being assembled, which will be made available over the Internet

    Scholarly journal access in academic libraries:issues for future development

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    As academia progresses towards the 21st century, increases in student numbers, distance learning, changes in copyright licensing and lack of funding means that academic institutions have to look more closely at the use of electronic resources in order to meet these challenges. The "wired campus" and "virtual university" mean more users looking for electronic resources and increased pressure on libraries to provide these services. The development of electronic journals in the early 1990s and the onset of electronic publishing appeared to be a solution to the problem. Journals could be stored electronically thereby saving space, the risk of lose, theft or damage is lessened and costs where significantly reduced. Electronic journals have become an increasingly important part of academic library collections, however they have not proved to be the panacea the profession hoped for. Electronic journal useage has created a new set of issues such as archiving, copyright, cataloguing, site licensing, remote access, hardware requirements and journal design. There are many stakeholders involved in the selection of electronic journals within academic libraries from librarians, to users and publishers. This paper attempts to raise awareness of some of the issues which will have to be considered if scholarly electronic journal publishing is to develop over the next decade. The content and ideas presented in the paper are derived from research undertaken in the area for a student Masters dissertation

    Electronic journals

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    pp. 33-4

    Electronic Journals

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    Scholarly journals, which include substantive research articles and other materials,including letters to the editor,book reviews,and announcements of meetings, trace their origins back to 1665,with Les Journal des Scavans (trans.,“Journal of the experts”) in Paris and Proceedings of the Royal Society of London in London. These journals developed to share scientific discoveries among interested parties and to establish who was first to have made a given discovery or to have advanced a given theory. Peer review is an important part of publication in scholarly journals. It is a system whereby scholars who are experts in the same field as the author (the author’s peers) read,comment on,and recommend publication or rejection of an article.This process is usually single-blind (the author does not know who the reviewers are, but the reviewers know who the author is) or double-blind (the author does not know who the reviewers are and the reviewers do not know the identity of the author), which gives both readers and authors increased confidence in the validity of the published articles.Although it has been criticized from time to time, peer review remains one of the most valued aspects of publication in scholarly journals, which are also referred to as peer-reviewed journals, scholarly journals, or refereed journals
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