4,613,894 research outputs found

    Spring 2015, With Support from the Emeriti Council, UNH Students Without Borders Make a Difference in Uganda

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    On January 5th, 2015 three UNH students: Nicolette Niemiec, Ashley Filion, and Megan Burke boarded a plane headed for the village of Lukodi, Uganda in Eastern Africa. They were joined by UNH faculty member Tom Ballestero, the project’s professional mentor. After 30 hours of plane travel and 7 hours of driving to reach the village, their feet finally touched the ground at Child Voice International (CVI). CVI has served as UNH Students Without Borders (SWB-UNH)’s host while in Uganda for each of the chapter’s past five trips. The mission of CVI is to restore the voices of children who have been affected by the Ugandan civil war. This non-government organization is located about 30 minutes from the nearest town (and source of electricity) and is right in the middle of the village of Lukodi, which has allowed the group to form a strong bond with the community. They have been a great partner for SWB-UNH and have strengthened the chapter’s efforts to connect with the community and get work done

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    This is your Linfield. Your gifts this year support students who are motivated to make a difference in our world

    A solution to Karttunen's Problem

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    There is a difference between the conditions in which one can felicitously assert a ‘must’-claim versus those in which one can use the corresponding non-modal claim. But it is difficult to pin down just what this difference amounts to. And it is even harder to account for this difference, since assertions of 'Must ϕ' and assertions of ϕ alone seem to have the same basic goal: namely, coming to agreement that [[ϕ]] is true. In this paper I take on this puzzle, known as Karttunen’s Problem. I begin by arguing that a ‘must’-claim is felicitous only if there is a shared argument for its prejacent. I then argue that this generalization, which I call Support, can explain the more familiar generalization that ‘must’-claims are felicitous only if the speaker’s evidence for them is in some sense indirect. Finally, I sketch a pragmatic derivation of Support

    Binomial Difference Ideal and Toric Difference Variety

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    In this paper, the concepts of binomial difference ideals and toric difference varieties are defined and their properties are proved. Two canonical representations for Laurent binomial difference ideals are given using the reduced Groebner basis of Z[x]-lattices and regular and coherent difference ascending chains, respectively. Criteria for a Laurent binomial difference ideal to be reflexive, prime, well-mixed, perfect, and toric are given in terms of their support lattices which are Z[x]-lattices. The reflexive, well-mixed, and perfect closures of a Laurent binomial difference ideal are shown to be binomial. Four equivalent definitions for toric difference varieties are presented. Finally, algorithms are given to check whether a given Laurent binomial difference ideal I is reflexive, prime, well-mixed, perfect, or toric, and in the negative case, to compute the reflexive, well-mixed, and perfect closures of I. An algorithm is given to decompose a finitely generated perfect binomial difference ideal as the intersection of reflexive prime binomial difference ideals.Comment: 72 page

    What ‘must’ adds

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    There is a difference between the conditions in which one can felicitously use a ‘must’-claim like and those in which one can use the corresponding claim without the ‘must’, as in 'It must be raining out' versus 'It is raining out. It is difficult to pin down just what this difference amounts to. And it is difficult to account for this difference, since assertions of 'Must p' and assertions of p alone seem to have the same basic goal: namely, communicating that p is true. In this paper I give a new account of the conversational role of ‘must’. I begin by arguing that a ‘must’-claim is felicitous only if there is a shared argument for the proposition it embeds. I then argue that this generalization, which I call Support, can explain the more familiar generalization that ‘must’-claims are felicitous only if the speaker’s evidence for them is in some sense indirect. Finally, I propose a pragmatic derivation of Support as a manner implicature

    The Relationship Between Student Perceptions of Faculty Support and Student Perceptions of Clinical Competency

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    This study explored the relationship between student perceptions of faculty support and student perceptions of clinical competency in beginning and senior level nursing students. A total of 91 ethnically diverse, generic baccalaureate nursing students from a state funded university participated in the study. The participants completed Mozingo, Thomas, and Brooks\u27 (1995) Perceived Competency Scale (PCS), Shelton\u27s (2003) Perceived Faculty Support Scales (PFSS), and a demographic questionnaire. An independent t test determined that the observed mean difference between perceived competency scores in 46 beginning students (M=32.02) and 45 senior students (M=27.36) was statistically significant (t (89) =3.25,p\u3c.05). The students demonstrated high scores of perceived faculty support and demonstrated no difference between the beginning (M=94.82) and the senior (M=95.61) nursing students (t (87) =-.25,p\u3e.05). No statistically significant correlation was found between student perceptions of faculty support and their perceptions of clinical competency (r=-.20, p\u3e.05) in both groups. However, this study identified faculty behaviors that were perceived to enhance student achievement

    The impact of study support : a report of a longitudinal study into the impact of participation in out-of-school-hours learning on the academic attainment, attitudes and school attendance of secondary school students

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    Study support makes a difference. It has an impact on three key aspects of students’ school careers: • attainment at GCSE and KS3 SATs; • attitudes to school; • attendance at school. These findings were consistent for all groups of students in all schools in the study. - Study support can help to improve schools and can influence the attitudes to learning of teachers and parents as well as students
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