7,388 research outputs found

    Dahlia Mosaic Virus on Dahlia

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    Dahlias are economically important crops in the cut flower industry, which is growing rapidly in US Mountain West. Dahlia stems can be sold at 4to4 to 5 each on wholesale markets, as locally produced dahlias are particularly sought after by florists due to their higher quality and longer vase life than imports. There are many different varieties of dahlias, and they can all be impacted by Dahlia Mosaic Virus (DMV), a widespread viral disease. DMV is causing significant losses in quality and yield of dahlias. This fact sheet details the symptoms, disease cycle, and management

    Circular 117

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    The annual flower trials were planted from 30 May through 4 June, 1999 in the Perennial Landscape and All America Selections Display Garden of the Georgeson Botanical Garden (64°51N, 147°52W). Fairbanks silt loam soil was fertilized with 1 0 -2 0 -2 0 S (4 lbs per 100 sq feet, 195 g per sq meter) on 28 May. With the exception of dahlias, all flowers were grown as seedling transplants and were hardened off outdoors for one week prior to transplanting. Tuberous roots of dahlias were planted in containers five weeks prior to transplanting and were hardened off

    Circular 119

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    The annual flower trials were planted from 30 May through 2 June, 2000 in the Perennial Landscape and All America Selections Display Garden of the Georgeson Botanical Garden (64°51/N, 147°52'W ). Fairbanks silt loam soil was fertilized with 10-20-20S (4 lbs per 100 sq feet; 195 g per sq meter) on 28 May. With the exception of dahlias, all flowers were grown as seedling transplants, and were hardened off outdoors for one week prior to transplanting. Tuberous roots of dahlias were planted in containers five weeks prior to transplanting and were hardened off

    Growing Dahlias, Dahlia coccinea Cav., for Commercial Cut Flower Production in Aquaponics and AutoPots

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    Commercial floriculture is years behind food agriculture in the adoption of organic and sustainable practices and enacts a heavy toll on the environment, resulting in excessive water usage, soil erosion, heavy pesticide use, and a massive carbon footprint. In this study, Dahlias (D. Coccinea) were grown in AutoPots fed by an established aquaponics system to explore the sustainability and environmental impacts of aquaponics on commercial floriculture. Dahlias were grown starting from both tubers and cuttings, for a six month period, in a greenhouse setting, assessing the bloom time, bloom quality, stem count, pesticide usage, water usage, and tuber formation. Dahlias bloomed in a typical time frame, compared to field grown plants, the quality of the blooms was equivalent to field grown, the stem counts were significantly lower than field grown, pesticide usage was slightly decreased, water usage was dramatically lower than field grown, and tuber formation was not impacted. To date, this is the first published evidence that Dahlias can be grown in aquaponics, that typical environmental benefits were observed when growing Dahlias via this method, and tuber formation was not hindered by the high moisture conditions produced by a coupled aquaculture system

    Gladiolus and Dahlias

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    Sustainable flower bulb production: prototyping integrated flower bulb production systems on sandy soils in The Netherlands

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    Flower bulb production in The Netherlands is economically successful. However, production methods rely heavily on external inputs, causing contamination of surface and ground water. The use of pesticides has been estimated 100 kg active ingredient (a.i.) per ha in 1994. In the same year the annual use of nitrogen and phosphate was 310 and 130 kg per ha respectively. Over the last decade the Dutch government established targets for the input and emission of pesticides and (in)organic fertilizers, energy use and volume of production related waste. Prototype flower bulb farming systems, with regard to these objectives, were developed, tested and improved on three experimental farms. This article concentrates on the results of two experimental farms on sandy soils in the west of The Netherlands in the period 1991-1997: ‘De Noord’ at St. Maartensbrug and ‘De Zuid’ at Hillegom. At both experimental farms the use of pesticides was reduced with at least 75% compared to the reference year of 1987-1988. Considerable reduction in the use of soil fumigants and fungicides was realised, but not of herbicides and insecticides. The use of nitrogen and phosphate decreased to approximately 215 kg and 55 kg per ha respectively. The integrated prototypes of experimental farm ‘De Zuid’ were economically competitive with flowerbulb farms in the same region. Integrated farming prototypes of ‘De Noord’ were less profitable due to suboptimal soil conditions, over-ambitious research targets and i nexperienced management. As a spin-off of this farming system research, 24 flower bulb growers are converting to integrated flowerbulb growing on their farms. They are supported by research and extension worker

    Some aspects of seed production and the evaluation of herbicides for tuber production of the Hammett "Figaro" series semi-dwarf dahlia : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Horticultural Science in Seed Technology at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

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    Seed yield and quality information was collected from 14 clones of a double flowering semi-dwarf (0.75-1m) bedding Dahlia series, bred by Dr Keith Hammett of Auckland, in the 1994-95 season at Palmerston North. Half-sib progeny were grown out to assess flower colour and doubleness in the 1995-96 season. Seed yield (0.03-6.66g/plant) varied widely among the clones. Seed yield was affected more by the fertility of disc florets than by their number and so the highest seed production potential was likely to be maintained in clones of high bloom quality (degree of doubleness). Clones with yellow, orange or red flowers had greater fertility than clones with purple - magenta, white, or pale colours. This may well reflect a fertility- colour link related to the original hybridization of the garden Dahlia from two wild species If such a link exists then careful manipulation of clonal ratios may be required to maintain a good overall balance of colours. Maintaining seed quality required drying seed without delay, especially when seed was harvested under cooler conditions. Very low levels of primary dormancy were detected, but some clones produced seed which when germinated at a later date varied both in time to 50% germination (over six days) and spread of germination (over four days). This could have significant implications during plant establishment under nursery conditions, and dry storage or possibly a longer period of pre-chilling is suggested to reduce this variation. This requires further evaluation. Oxyfluorfen, oxyfluorfen plus oryzalin, oxadiazon, and oxadiazon plus simazine herbicide treatments did not affect tuber yields and subsequent forced re-sprouting of seedling material under glasshouse conditions. Trifluralin and oryzalin reduced tuber yields, similar to the unweeded control. This was due to competition from inadequately controlled weeds, rather than any obvious toxic effects from these two herbicides. No visual phytotoxicity was observed in any of the treatments in either the initial growing season or the subsequent forced resprouting although the herbicides were not applied directly over the top of the plants. [From Introduction

    Dahlias - lifting and storing the tubers

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    Now that the flowering season for dahlias has finished, arrangements must be made for lifting and storing the tubers. Many losses occur each year during the dormant period and most of these are due either to carelessness or lack of knowledge. While the storage provided for dahlias during the winter months may be thoroughly satisfactory, tubers are often lost because of the treatments received by the plants during the growing period

    Dahlia Cut Flower Production in Utah

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    Dahlias are tuberous, herbaceous plants that are frost sensitive and therefore grown as a warm-season annual for cut flower production in Utah. Dahlias bloom in summer to fall, with peak production in late summer to early fall, and the season ending with first frost. Plants benefit from pinching to encourage branching and horizontal trellising or staking to promote straight stems and avoid toppling. High tunnels or extended low tunnels with shade, as well as optimum nitrogen and irrigation rates, improve production. As showstoppers in arrangements, dahlia cut flowers are highly desired on local markets and profitable to produce, particularly those with ball, decorative, or dinnerplate blooms

    Logological Poetry: An Editorial

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    It was Dmitri Borgmann who put the word logology into circulation. Before Language on Vacation, his first book, was published, he wrote to me: I don\u27t believe the word \u27logology\u27 has ever appeared in a book devoted to words or puzzles. I dug it out of the unabridged Oxford while searching for a suitable name for my activity
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