31,623 research outputs found

    Detection and fine-grained classification of cyberbullying events

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    In the current era of online interactions, both positive and negative experiences are abundant on the Web. As in real life, negative experiences can have a serious impact on youngsters. Recent studies have reported cybervictimization rates among teenagers that vary between 20% and 40%. In this paper, we focus on cyberbullying as a particular form of cybervictimization and explore its automatic detection and fine-grained classification. Data containing cyberbullying was collected from the social networking site Ask.fm. We developed and applied a new scheme for cyberbullying annotation, which describes the presence and severity of cyberbullying, a post author's role (harasser, victim or bystander) and a number of fine-grained categories related to cyberbullying, such as insults and threats. We present experimental results on the automatic detection of cyberbullying and explore the feasibility of detecting the more fine-grained cyberbullying categories in online posts. For the first task, an F-score of 55.39% is obtained. We observe that the detection of the fine-grained categories (e.g. threats) is more challenging, presumably due to data sparsity, and because they are often expressed in a subtle and implicit way

    Why cybersafety tips don’t work for cyberbullying

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    Research into cyberbullying in Australia has been slow. This is partly because rigorous research takes time, both to conduct, to analyse and to publish. In addition, Australian governments and other decision makers did not realise that cyberbullying was happening until there was greater media attention to the problem in the last few years. This meant that there was no serious research money allocated to cyberbullying research in Australia until about two years ago. In addition, initial research has mainly looked at how many students have been cyberbullied and what were the consequences. As far as I know there is only one large research project which is looking at what programs actually work to prevent and/or intervene in cyberbullying in Australia and that will take time to ascertain. However, our society wants quick fixes and they want a quick fix for cyberbullying

    Cyberbullying

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    Innovative communication technologies have changed in our lives crucially. An easy platform for communication between people from different parts of the world has appeared, which is known as the Internet. Meanwhile, the negative impact of Internet technologies includes the lack of social F2F interaction, which hinders the skills of interpersonal contact. As a result, the number of Internet crimes against the individual is growing, which is sometimes not separated from the virtual image

    Cyberbullying

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    In modern society we are increasingly faced with the phenomenon of cyber bullying, also known as cyber mobbing, and online mobbing. In a broad sense, persecution is the systematic, repeated for a long time bullying, abuse, humiliation of the dignity of another person, for example, at school, in the workplace, in prison, and through the Internet, and so on. The typical steps taken when bullying is spreading false information (rumors and gossip) about the man who taunts and provocations, direct insults and intimidation, social isolation (boycott and demonstrative ignoring) attacks that infringe the honor and dignity of the person caused material or physical harm
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