158 research outputs found

    Encyclopedia of Missouri courthouses

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    "UED 62, 2/81/4M""Missouri became a state in 1821, the 24th state to be admitted to the Union and the second state formed from the land acquired in the 1803 Louisiana Purchase. By 1861 the state had authorized formation of 114 counties to complete Missouri's present county organization. Only three states contain more counties-Texas, Georgia and Kentucky. The purpose of this work is to provide information regarding dates of construction, names of architects and builders, approximate costs, and illustrations whenever possible for every courthouse known to have been built in Missouri. This encyclopedia is not intended to be a complete story of any county's courthouses. Such an effort would touch upon many aspects of Missouri's cultural, political, social and geographical history; however, the bibliographies that conclude each of these reports will help local historians begin such an undertaking."--from Preface.Marian M. Ohman (University of Missouri--Columbia, Extension Division

    A history of Missouri's counties, county seats, and courthouse squares (1983)

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    Series information taken from "1888-1984, Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service publications." May not represent this version.Includes bibliographical references (pages 139-142) and index

    A history of Missouri's counties, county seats, and courthouse squares (1983)

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    Series information taken from "1888-1984, Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service publications." May not represent this version.Includes bibliographical references (pages 139-142) and index

    Creating a sense of place or simply a good parking space?:evolution of the historic town squares of Mississippi

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    Mississippi has a surprising amount and variety of town squares. The square provides a central, pedestrian civic space in the towns in which they are located. The purpose of this thesis is to explore the evolution of town squares in Mississippi. The method employed was historical research of primary sources that included historic photographs and Sanborn Fire Insurance maps. The photographs were examined using the The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties investigating such elements as vegetation, site furnishings, and circulation patterns. Canton, Holly Springs, and Lexington were chosen to be studied in more detail to give a clearer picture of how squares have changed over time. It was determined that there are approximately 69 towns with squares in Mississippi. The most numerous types of squares used are Shelbyville squares. The vitality of the square varies greatly from town to town

    Sweet Briar, 1800-1900: Palladian Plantation House, Italianate Villa, Aesthetic Retreat

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    Sweet Briar House is one of the best documented sites in Virginia, with sources ranging from architectural drawings and extensive archives to original furnishings. Sweet Briar House was purchased by Elijah Fletcher, a prominent figure in Lynchburg, Virginia, in 1830. Thirty years later it passed into the possession of his daughter Indiana Fletcher Williams, and remained her home until her death in 1900. In her will, Williams left instructions for the founding of Sweet Briar Institute, an educational institution for women that exists today as Sweet Briar College. This dissertation examines Sweet Briar House in three distinct phases, while advancing three theses. The first thesis proposes that the double portico motif introduced by Palladio at the Villa Cornaro in the sixteenth century became the fundamental motif of Palladianism in Virginia architecture, generating a line of offspring that proliferated in the eighteenth century and beyond. The Palladian plantation (Sweet Briar House I, c. 1800) featured this double portico. In 1851, following the return of the Fletcher children from an extended Grand Tour of Europe, the house was remodeled as an Italianate villa (Sweet Briar House II, 1851-52). The second thesis advances the contention that by renovating their Palladian house into an asymmetrical Italianate villa, the Fletcher family implemented an ideal solution between the balanced façade that characterized the Palladian Sweet Briar House I and the fashion for the Picturesque that dominated American building in the second half of the nineteenth century. In 1876, the Williams family traveled to the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, where visitors were presented with an unimaginable array of artistic possibilities from countless eras and nations, exactly the conditions that the Aesthetic Movement needed to flourish in America. The third thesis maintains that the Williams family’s decision to transform Sweet Briar House into an Aesthetic Movement retreat was inspired by their reaction to the Centennial, and in particular by their appreciation for the Japanese objects presented there

    Mirroring Modernity: on consumerism in cosmopolitan Zanzibar

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    This essay develops an image of nineteenth century Zanzibari consumer sensibilities by demonstrating how goods from and new engagements with distant locales affected the socio-cultural landscape of Zanzibar. The East African port’s particular cosmopolitanism represents one form of social reconstitution stimulated by global integration. It also represents a material vision of global relations that was discounted by nineteenth century theorizations of Western modernity. By focusing on the rise of a new materiality in Zanzibar, I excavate precolonial visions of global relations and cultural assimilations of global symbols. I argue that East African desires for goods produced all over the globe represented not simply a Westernization, Indicization, or Arabization of Zanzibar, but also a reconfiguration of a standardized set of global materials in an attempt to bring Zanzibari cultural forms into conversation with broader global trends

    The Parthenon, February 6, 2013

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    The Parthenon, Marshall University’s student newspaper, is published by students Monday through Friday during the regular semester and weekly Thursday during the summer. The editorial staff is responsible for the news and the editorial content

    Full Issue Vol. 23 No. 1

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    ETHJ Vol-43 No-2

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